It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

A solar flare to dwarf the Earth...Oct 14th 2012

page: 2
8
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:36 AM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


The word fact escapes the likes of people like you.

You rather deal with dellusional musings you post as threads/posts...




posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:37 AM
link   
Do not need any papers to see, that there is no connection between earthquakes and geomagnetic storms.
Just a few years daily looking at NOAA solar activity and USGS



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:37 AM
link   
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 

Ah yes.
Delusional to show no correlation between the solar cycle and earthquake activity. Oh wait. The data shows that. I didn't make it up.



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:38 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 

So.
Peer Review = Fact.

Let's talk about peer review and AGW then.


Lets..

How many peer reviewed papers on the subject of geomagnetics have you authored?



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by RobertF

How many peer reviewed papers on the subject of geomagnetics have you authored?

On Solar activity and earthquakes? Just the one here on ATS. Reviewed by my peers.
How'd you like it?



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:46 AM
link   


Influences of Solar Cycles on Earthquakes

Full Text(PDF, 279KB) PP.436-443 DOI: 10.4236/ns.2011.36060


Author(s)

Marilia Tavares, Anibal Azevedo


KEYWORDS

Solar Cycles; Earthquakes; Currents; Geomagnetic

Cite this paper

Tavares, M. and Azevedo, A. (2011) Influences of Solar Cycles on Earthquakes. Natural Science, 3, 436-443.doi: 10.4236/ns.2011.36060.


ABSTRACT

This paper inspects possible influence of solar cycles on earthquakes through of statistical analyses. We also discussed the mechanism that would drive the occurrence of increasing of earthquakes during solar maxima. The study was based on worldwide earthquakes events during approximately four hundred years (1600-2010).The increase of earthquakes events followed the Maxima of Solar cycle, and also depends on the tectonic plate location. From 1600 until 1645 events increased during the Maxima in some of the tectonic plates as Pacific, Arabian and South America. The earthquakes analyzed during two grand solar minima, the Maunder (1645-1720) and the Dalton (1790-1820) showed a decrease in the number of earth-quakes and the solar activity. It was observed during these minima a significant number of events at specific geological features. After the last minima (Dalton) the earthquakes pattern increased with solar maxima. The calculations showed that events increasing during solar maxima most in the Pacific, South America or Arabian until 1900. Since there were few records during these three centuries we needed addi-tional analysis on modern data. We took the last four solar cycles events (1950-2010) and made similar calculations. The results agreed with the former calculations. It might be that the mecha-nism for the Sun-Earth connection relies on the solar wind speed. In both records (1600-1900) and (1950-2010) the results showed a significant increase in earthquakes events in some of the tectonic plates linked to solar maxima. The So-lar wind energy striking the Earths magneto-sphere affects the entire environment because the pressure on the region increases and the magnetosphere shrinks sometimes four Earths radii. This sudden compression causes earth-quakes in specific plates. During the times of solar minima the pressure from the solar wind on the earth decreases, then the magnetosphere expands and earthquakes happen in a different pattern according to the geological feature on earths surface less frequently. Solar driven events include coronal mass ejections (CME) and coronal holes, which are at a maximum during the descending phase of solar activity. The tectonic are important because there is he-terogeneity in the crust and the tectonic stress depends on each region. The geo-effectiveness of solar wind from a coronal hole only depends on the position of the hole relative to the Earth and for the CMEs an additional factor is their velocity. The influence of these solar events could be detected from electromagnetic varia-tions on the ground prior the earthquakes. The goal in this research was to show the solar events influenced the earthquakes and seis-mologic events following some special display and also how the Sun’s activity played to make earthquakes increase. This paper discussed details of this mechanism, calculations and as-sociated factors.

www.scirp.org...

But trust me, he won't stop trying to claim the contrary.

BTW, the Sun isn't the only source for triggering earthquakes on Earth, and on this he will also tell you "nothing on space can trigger earthquakes on Earth" or some such nonsense. Of course he would say the only things that could trigger earthquakes are large metorites, or a comet crashing on Earth...



edit on 17-10-2012 by ElectricUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by Phage

Originally posted by RobertF

How many peer reviewed papers on the subject of geomagnetics have you authored?

On Solar activity and earthquakes? Just the one here on ATS. Reviewed by my peers.
How'd you like it?


Haven't read it. Although I will now.

But in all honesty will not place much credence in it due to the simple fact that it was "reviewed" by peers on a anonymous website with no credible scientific backing.



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:48 AM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Well, I guess geomagnetic energy could produce earthquake and waves

Sunspots => Solar Flares (charged particles) => Magnetic Field Shift => Shifting Ocean and Jet Stream Currents => Extreme Weather [including earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes or other extreme natural events]



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:52 AM
link   

Originally posted by RobertF

Haven't read it. Although I will now.

But in all honesty will not place much credence in it due to the simple fact that it was "reviewed" by peers on a anonymous website with no credible scientific backing.


In two minutes I debunked the lies he posted on that thread he made which had not one ounce of truth in it...

He thinks that there must be a linear correlation between the Sun's activity and Earth's earthquakes, but he doesn't understand that it also depends on how strong is the Earth's magnetic field in the area, how strong the solar activity is, and other sources from space which can also trigger earthquakes on Earth...

His mind can't seem to be able to wrap around such concept as "there being multiple factors which can trigger earthquakes on Earth"...



edit on 17-10-2012 by ElectricUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:57 AM
link   
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 

And it probably has something to do with how many people flush their toilets at the same time as well. The more variables you want to add the more hopeless it becomes to claim that a geomagnetic storm will result in an earthquake, which is what the OP was suggesting.

Solar activity follows a fairly regular cycle. If there were a causal relationship between solar activity and earthquakes it would be readily apparent. We could expect more earthquakes during solar maximum. The data does not show that.

edit on 10/17/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 02:58 AM
link   
USSR experiments in what is today Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan showed that electricity can increase background seismicity rates/statistics.

The technology used was electricity generated by a Magnetohydrodynamic machine apparatus.

It was physically pumped into the ground via cables.

For the physical part the evidence is there, but in terms of space weather it's the least studied if you compare that more volume of studies for temperature, rainfall/droughts, cyclones/hurricanes(NASA cited the 22-year hurricane cycle paper for its 2011 North Atlantic Basin report) etc...



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 03:06 AM
link   
reply to post by wujotvowujotvowujotvo
 

I've seen those reports. The generators produced extremely high currents at high voltages, much greater that those produced by geomagnetic activity. A slight increase in very (very) low level seismic activity was seen to occur between 2 and 7 days after the "injection" at distances of about 150km.

It's thought that the concept may be useful in mapping faults. But it's been a problem making a direct connection between the electrical jolt and the seismic activity, at least in coming up with a mechanism for explaining how it would work.

There is a clear delay in the field experiment data of two days between current injection and earthquake occurrence. We cannot currently account for this in our modelling, although research is continuing.

adsabs.harvard.edu...
edit on 10/17/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 03:09 AM
link   
reply to post by Phage
 


Keep talking bs meanwhile REAL scientists say...


International Journal of the Physical Sciences Vol. 7(24), pp. 3082-3088, 22 June, 2012
Available online at www.academicjournals.org...
DOI: 10.5897/IJPS12.310
ISSN 1992 - 1950 © 2012 Academic Journals


Full Length Research Paper


Probing relation between solar activities and seismicity

Bijan Nikouravan1,2,3*, J. J. Rawal3, Rahman Sharifi4 and Mahmoud Nikkhah5

1Department of Physics, Astrophysics, Varamin Pishva Branch, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Varamin, Iran.
2Department of Physics, Astrophysics, University of Malaya (UM), 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
3The Indian Planetary Society (IPS), Mumbai, 400092, India, 400092 Mumbai, India.
4Department of Geology, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran.
5Department of Civil Engineering, Semnan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Semnan, Iran.

Accepted 07 May, 2012

In this paper, we studied the relationship between sunspots numbers (SNs), solar 10.7 cm radio flux (SRF), solar irradiance (SI), solar proton events (SPEs) and local earthquakes. The location of the study is selected in Iran area and all earthquakes data chosen for 4 from 1970 to 2010. The study reveals the following conclusions: (i) The total number of local earthquakes in maximum years of solar activities is greater than the minimum years of solar activities from 1964 to 2010, (ii) The total local earthquakes frequency (EF) in the maximum period of solar activities is very close to the maximum annual means of sunspots numbers, (iii)The total local EF in the maximum period of solar activity is very close to the maximum annual means of SPE with negative correlation coefficient, (iv) The local earthquakes in the minimum period of solar activities is very close to the minimum annual means of sunspots numbers with negative correlation and (v) The local earthquake in the minimum period of solar activities is very near to SRF with negative correlation.

Key words: Solar activities, sunspots, solar proton events, solar irradiance, earthquake.
...

Link


edit on 17-10-2012 by ElectricUniverse because: fix link



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 03:14 AM
link   
Very insightful debate...good argue
...can I add this as evidence?helios.izmiran.rssi.ru...



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 03:25 AM
link   
You see, when the Sun's activity is strong/high this influences the climate and can trigger earthquakes on Earth.

When the Sun's activity is weak/low the interplanetary field is of course weaker allowing magnetic anomalies from other sources outside the Solar System to influence the Earth's climate, as well as possibly triggering earhtquakes.

This is another concept that Phage seems unable to grasp, yet he wants to play scientist when his mind is not able to grasp simple concepts...



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 03:50 AM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 04:32 AM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 04:38 AM
link   
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 

So in Iran solar activity correlates with earthquake activity but not worldwide. So if you live in Iran you can expect more earthquakes during solar maximum. The study makes no note of geomagnetic activity.

First, they only look at solar maximum and minimums, ignoring what happens during the 11 (or so) years between. They also seem to include data from the current cycle which has not reached it maximum (or minimum) yet.

But their interpretation of the data is a bit odd. They say this:

The total number of local earthquakes in maximum years of solar activities is greater than the minimum years of solar activities from 1964 to 2010
More earthquakes during solar maximum than solar minimum, right? Let's So let's look at their data. Table 1:
For Solar cycle 20 they show an earthquake frequency (EF) of 71 at solar maximum. At solar minimum an earthquake frequency of 71. The same frequency.
Cycle 21 maximum EF is 161. Minimum is 78. More earthquakes at maximum.
Cycle 22 maximum EF is 79. Minimum is 118. More earthquakes at minimum.
Cycle 23 maximum EF is 98. Minimum is 153. More earthquakes at minimum.

So out of 4 solar cycles they show 1 cycle (21) when there were more earthquakes during the maximum than the minimum and they say that there is a direct correlation between solar maximum and earthquake frequency. Huh?
 



(ii) The total local earthquakes frequency (EF) in the maximum period of solar activities is very close to the maximum annual means of sunspots numbers
The number of earthquakes is close to the annual sunspot number. This is a really odd claim. Somehow the number of sunspots matches the number of earthquakes in Iran. But does it? If you look at their Table 3 it really doesn't.
 



So what do we have?
They claim there are more earthquakes during solar maximum than solar minimum but their data doesn't seem to show that.
They claim there is a correlation between the number of earthquakes and the maximum sunspot number but their data doesn't support that.
They use specific points of what in reality is a continuous curve and ignore what happens in between those points.
In spite of using only minimum and maxiumum for prior cycles they include incomplete data from cycle 24 in the the calculation correlation coefficients.

The article is a joke and is a very good illustration that peer reviewed publication is not necessarily the best criterion for determining validity.
www.academicjournals.org...

edit on 10/17/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 05:13 AM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 06:01 AM
link   
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 




No, it is you who can't understand those papers, and instead you come up with your own thesis which is completely wrong as it uses your wrong assumptions and lack of knowledge in the topic...


I am just wondering if you understand what is said in those links you posted... I ask because of these...



ABOUT POSSIBLE INFLUENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVITY UPON SEISMIC AND VOLCANIC ACTIVITIES: LONG-TERM FORECAST




This paper inspects possible influence of solar cycles on earthquakes through of statistical analyses.


There seems to be an interesting comment in both of those and that would be...

Possible Influence

I am not a genius by no means but the word possible doesn't mean there is a definite connection which you seem to be implying.



new topics

top topics



 
8
<< 1    3  4 >>

log in

join