Hereditary Colon Cancer?

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posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 06:20 PM
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Ok, here's the deal, Im 26, and both of my parents died at around 50-55 with colon cancer. They had drank alot when they were young, had bad eating habits (my dad was a trucker, and from what I can tell my mom was a drunk) and were avid smokers. I am not any of that, I try as much as I can to eat healthy, I don't drink or smoke. I went to the Gastroenerologist (sp?) to talk to him about some acid reflux problems that I've been having, and mentioned the parent's thing to him, and he ordered a colonoscopy, right away due to "cautionary procedures" Since both of my parents died from colon cancer. I was supposed to have it done tomorrow morning, but cancelled. Am I right for thinking that it seemed wrong that he wanted to jump the gun on getting me to have a colonoscopy? Im 26 for christ sakes, and it just seems wrong to me also that this thought of colon cancer being a hereditary disease? I mean come on, I can understand if I were to follow in his footsteps (with the drinking, smoking and bad eating habits) But seriously, just because I was born by them, Im somehow more at risk? why? I just dont get it. Sorry. I guess my question really is, What's your opinion? Do you think that colon cancer has to do more with lifestyle or genetics? And mods, please move this as you feel fit...




posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by Angelsoftheapocalypse
 


For goodness sakes, PLEASE have the colonoscopy! My step-father is a colon cancer survivor, but only because he started having the tests annually and it was caught in time. His mother, brother and sister were not as lucky. It has nothing to do with your lifestyle. Nobody in his family were smokers or drinkers and they all ate a healthy diet.

My best friend is 43, but started having annual colonoscopy in her 20s as it runs in her family as well and some have died of colon cancer. It is never to early to start testing as colon cancer is no respecter of age or lifestyle.

If your doctor wants you to have one please reschedule it ASAP. It could save your life!



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 06:29 PM
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reply to post by Angelsoftheapocalypse
 

I don't know for sure on the colon cancer, I just recently lost my brother in law to that just so you know why I am posting here.

I am an old guy here....early 50's and I lost one of my closer buddies when we were just 20 years old and it was due to cancer as you probably guessed.

My advice to you and you may not like it but here it is......re-schedule the test and be done with it.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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Yes- genetic factors cause you to be at a higher risk for colon cancer. I've already had my second colonoscopy, and I'm way under the age of a usual first screening. This is due to the fact that my father is a colon cancer survivor, and my maternal grandmother died of colon cancer. Her mother, my great-grandmother, also had serious colon issues. My sister and I both have gastrointestinal issues.

The worst part of the colonoscopy is the prep. However, I'll deal with it because I don't want to potentially go through life with a colostomy bag like my dad.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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Maybe I will get a colonoscopy, but later. I just think that alot of these tests that docs have patients do, are just so they can up their revenue. I just got done doing a series of tests for everything from lung disease to diabetes, just to find out that I had NOTHING wrong with me! Just irks me that just because two members of my family had it, then it automatically means that I am more at risk. Does that not sound strange to you?

And by the way, from the research that I have done, I have found that only 5% of all colon cancers were hereditary. 5%!
edit on 10/16/2012 by Angelsoftheapocalypse because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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Get the colonoscopy. I just lost my brother to colon cancer, he was 30 years old. They caught it too late when it was already at Stage IV. Went through chemo for over a year and then watched him die for 2 months, unable to eat any sort of food because he could not digest. It was the worst thing I have ever been through, can't imagine how it was for him. I'm sure you are scared because of what your parents went through, but getting check-ups and catching it early makes all the difference. The difference between treatable and "it's too late". You'll be in my thoughts, I am wishing you the best.



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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Originally posted by kittyfatale
Get the colonoscopy. I just lost my brother to colon cancer, he was 30 years old. They caught it too late when it was already at Stage IV. Went through chemo for over a year and then watched him die for 2 months, unable to eat any sort of food because he could not digest. It was the worst thing I have ever been through, can't imagine how it was for him. I'm sure you are scared because of what your parents went through, but getting check-ups and catching it early makes all the difference. The difference between treatable and "it's too late". You'll be in my thoughts, I am wishing you the best.


My condolences for your loss. Hugs, prayers, and good thoughts your way. Hopefully, people will see your post and make the decision to go ahead and get the colonoscopy.



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 02:17 PM
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Originally posted by Angelsoftheapocalypse
Maybe I will get a colonoscopy, but later. I just think that alot of these tests that docs have patients do, are just so they can up their revenue. I just got done doing a series of tests for everything from lung disease to diabetes, just to find out that I had NOTHING wrong with me! Just irks me that just because two members of my family had it, then it automatically means that I am more at risk. Does that not sound strange to you?


First of all, the doctors are usually sending you to a lab to get these tests; so...no, they are not making extra money from it. Believe it or not, most doctors get into the practice because they actually care about people and not for the money (contrary to what many believe).

Second, the tests you've had. Were they ordered because you are sick or under the weather? If so, that makes sense that your doctor wants you to be tested for colon cancer now.

It is also important to realize that the tests that doctors order are not always to determine your ailments, rather to set up a 'starting point' or baseline. They need a base to compare future tests against, so they can see changes. For instance, the lungs: You need a base pulmonary level to use so they can see if you develop lung or heart disease. If you wait until you have heart and lung disease, then it is often too late.

It is very wise to have tests while you are young and healthy. This way, if you do happen to come down sick, any future test can show any changes and just how quickly changes have occurred.

Third, get the test your doctor ordered! I mean unless you are going to experience extreme financial hardship by getting it, I can't think of any other reason not to. Get it done and forget about it. The stress of NOT having it is reason enough! Stress = premature aging and early death.
edit on 18-10-2012 by SourGrapes because: (no reason given)



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