If the Moon was mostly salt, could frozen water on the Moon be confirmed?

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posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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I make this thread because now I am curious...We are talking about the Moon here which we know has no gravitational pull...Because with no gravity you can't condensate water...So I saw this previous post about frozen water on the Moon...Ok, so how did this frozen water become such a surprise...If there was an actual moon landing wouldn't something this obvious be noticed?....So what if the Moon surface is salt? Well with enough heat, the heat from the sun would burn the salt, which will become water. So when we supposedly landed on the Moon did we notice that the surface was salt?... I really have no sources to this theory. This was just off the top of my dome... Please contribute if you can.




posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:50 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
I make this thread because now I am curious...We are talking about the Moon here which we know has no gravitational pull...Because with no gravity you can't condensate water...So I saw this previous post about frozen water on the Moon...Ok, so how did this frozen water become such a surprise...If there was an actual moon landing wouldn't something this obvious be noticed?....So what if the Moon surface is salt? Well with enough heat, the heat from the sun would burn the salt, which will become water. So when we supposedly landed on the Moon did we notice that the surface was salt?... I really have no sources to this theory. This was just off the top of my dome... Please contribute if you can.


The moon has gravitational pull.

There is nowhere in the universe that does not have gravity.

Burned salt does not turn into water.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:52 AM
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reply to post by WhatAreThey
 





Burned salt does not turn into water.


Ohhh excuse my grammar...Acute exposure to heat....



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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Last time I checked...Salt hydrates the body...I wonder why? Does heat turn salt into some type of energy water?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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I doubt there is frozen water on the Moon to be honest. After all, the moon is just an oversized piece of rock (If memory serves me right, that is basically what it is categorized as, but don't quote me, I truly don't remember) I barely know anything on the moon to be honest, I just don't think there is water on the Moon, it just seems unlikely.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:59 AM
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reply to post by TehSlenderMan
 


Yeah I just find it to be impossible...If the moon has no atmosphere. The only thing is could the surface of the Moon be an abundance of salt?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by KonquestAbySS
 


The moon does have gravity.....not as much as we do here, but it is there. I am no expert on the matter at all, but I think, if memory serves me right in my old age it's something like 1/6 th of that here on earth.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by KonquestAbySS
 


Ehh, not so sure on that either. If the pictures of the moon are legit, and the findings, then no, I don't think so. There are pictures of moon rocks, and the dirt on the moon (I think it is?) Like I said, I am not very well educated on the Moon, as much as I love space, there was never a serious reason to know anything about it lol, but back on topic. The moon rocks and the dirt just looked like regular rocks and dirt. Nothing else.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by billy197300
 


Ok, can you confirm that there is enough gravity on the moon to condensate water?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:08 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
reply to post by WhatAreThey
 





Burned salt does not turn into water.


Ohhh excuse my grammar...Acute exposure to heat....


That does not happen either. Salt can turn to a a liquid if heated sufficiently, but it does not become water. Why do you think salt transforms into water?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
reply to post by billy197300
 


Ok, can you confirm that there is enough gravity on the moon to condensate water?


No, absolutely not. I have no idea honestly. I just know it does have gravity. Hopefully someone will come along that is smarter than me about planets and gravity and clear this up.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by WhatAreThey
 





Why do you think salt transforms into water?


You seem to be a chemist expert all of a sudden you tell me....Does it become a vapor? Obviously it won't be its solid state...You got three basics states of being, Solid, liquid, vapor....



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:15 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
reply to post by WhatAreThey
 





Why do you think salt transforms into water?


You seem to be a chemist expert all of a sudden you tell me....Does it become a vapor? Obviously it won't be its solid state...You got three basics states of being, Solid, liquid, vapor....


Please share the chemical reaction whereby NaCl transforms into H2O.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:17 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
reply to post by billy197300
 


Ok, can you confirm that there is enough gravity on the moon to condensate water?


You are confusing gravity with pressure. Do you realize why clouds exist on earth and why water does not condense at higher elevations?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:21 AM
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reply to post by WhatAreThey
 


Salt can absorb water though? So if there is enough atmosphere to condensate some moisture, and if salt is abundant, and it captures that moisture and the heat from the sun releases it, then it becomes water?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 01:22 AM
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reply to post by WhatAreThey
 





You are confusing gravity with pressure. Do you realize why clouds exist on earth and why water does not condense at higher elevations?


Confused about what? Of course you need some type of gravity to have pressure...



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 02:27 AM
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Formula for Salt is: NaCl
That's a combination of Sodium and Chlorine. Water is H2O. NaCl does NOT equal H2O no matter what you do to NaCl.

Moon? No Gravity?

Have you attended ANY school at all?



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 02:30 AM
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Originally posted by KonquestAbySS
Last time I checked...Salt hydrates the body...I wonder why? Does heat turn salt into some type of energy water?


Salt does not hydrate you. It allows the retention of fluids. Too much salt causes you to retain too much. Just sayin'.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 02:33 AM
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reply to post by KonquestAbySS
 


Because with no gravity you can't condensate water

Why not? What does gravity have to do with "condensating" water? The word is actually condense. Condensate is a noun, not a verb.


There is water on the moon.

Some is in the form of ice hidden in craters at the poles which never receive sunlight and are very, very cold. No one ever landed there.

Some is locked up in minerals. You don't tend to notice that unless you look for it. It wasn't looked for until a few years ago.



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 08:01 AM
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The boiling point is dependant upon the surrounding air pressure, not gravity.

Theoretically though you can not have the one without the other because any matter does create a field of gravity, even single Atoms, but that's not relevant here.

Just imagine a baseball filled with water in deep space, far away from any mass. It would instantly start boiling because the surrounding air pressure is close to zero.

The only relation between Sodiumchloride and Water, is that it is considerd a hygroscopic substance. It does attract water. Nothing more, nothing less. The idea that the moon is mostly made of salt is funny at best.

edit on 16-10-2012 by H1ght3chHippie because: typ0





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