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How much fuel aviation burns per annum

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posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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I posted part of this in response to another thread, but hink it is worth retaining in a thread of its own to make it easier to find for future reference.

US Statistics in fuel use by different types of transport perannum since 1960

In 2010:

Aviation fuel: 12,712 million gallons
highway gasoline, diesel & other fuels: 169,769 million gallons (of which 86,666 million gallons are attributed to light vehicles with short wheelbase - ie cars and small trucks - and motorcycles)

Aviation is a long LONG way behind land transport in burning up hydrocarbons!!

Other transport - rail and water: another 11,130 million gallons of liquid fuel, and about 7,000 million kWh of electricity



edit on 15-10-2012 by Aloysius the Gaul because: change title
edit on 15-10-2012 by Aloysius the Gaul because: change title again




posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:11 PM
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you just answered your own question.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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reply to post by randomname
 


sometimes people do that


But you are right - so I changed the title again



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:17 PM
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Thats shocking. Even with all the contrails everywhere huh?
or are they really chemtrails?

I wonder why it costs 100an hour to rent a plane though.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:19 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


curious about the need to justify yourself
'cause if eveyone else is doing it...


didn't know cars and land vehicles ran on jet fuel...
/srk
edit on 15-10-2012 by DerepentLEstranger because: fixed smiley



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:24 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


curious why yuo needed to comment a all??

And why you think that the "gasoline, diesel and other fuel" clearly identified for ground vehicles is jet fuel??



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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Originally posted by phroziac
Thats shocking. Even with all the contrails everywhere huh?
or are they really chemtrails?

I wonder why it costs 100an hour to rent a plane though.


high capital, maintenance and fuel costs account for most of it. And for light a/c that yuo might hire also very low utilisation - they often only fly a couplfe of hundred hours per year, so the fixed costs (capital, some maintenance) have to be paid for over a small "volume of work".

Way back around 2003 I did a Royal Aeronautical Society course about commercial aviation in general (it was aimed at people with some aviation background to expand their knowledge into areas they weer not familiar with - mechaics learned about economics, pilots learned about maintenance, clerks learned about everything!) and het costs weer siad to be roughly 1/3rd capital, 1/3rd maintenance, 1/3rd fuel.

I've seen some figures lately that have different values - but those 3 remain the largest individual costs IIRC.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:42 PM
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Originally posted by Aloysius the Gaul
reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


curious why yuo needed to comment a all??

And why you think that the "gasoline, diesel and other fuel" clearly identified for ground vehicles is jet fuel??


what, this is a contrail "scientist" only thread?
pull the other one.

kind of ironic you'd ask that question, re this thread, as it's subject is practically a meme with you CS's

reading comprehension: Fail

and type slower, your dyslexia is showing.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 05:47 PM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


Yes it is a reading comprehension fail if you think that when I wrote "Gasoline, diesel and other fuels" used by ground vehicles I really meant jet fuel.

It is good that you recognise your weakness there - perhaps you can now take some remedial classes to help fix it.

I have no idea what the rest of your post is about.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by phroziac
Thats shocking. Even with all the contrails everywhere huh?
or are they really chemtrails?


Contrails are, for the most part, NOT the chemical exhaust caused by the burning of the jet fuel. Most of what is in a contrail is water, and most of that water was already in the air to begin with, before the plane flew through that air.

Jet exhaust is a pollutant, but is cleaner (pound for pound of fuel burnt) than automobile exhaust. Today's jet engines are very efficient.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 09:40 PM
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somewhat serendipitously I've just been to a presentation by Rob Fyfe, CEO of Air New Zealand, on the impact of technology on the airline industry.

He noted that a 777 flight from Auckland to London return costs about $1.3 million to run, and of that 55% is the cost of fuel, and "perhaps" 15% is maintenance.

Maintenance is way down because newer a/c such as 777-200's and especially 777-300's have much longer maintenance intervals than the 747-400's they are replacing. It is especially noticeable for th engines - with only 2 engines vs 4, and those engines being even more reliable, the engine maintenance costs are down over 50%.

They are expecting to get 787-9's by the end of 2013 (3 1/2 yrs after initially expected) which they expect to have a 20% further advantage over 777's in running costs per seat-kilometer, again much of it from maintenance due to replacing aluminium structures with composites, and also much lower fuel burn.
edit on 15-10-2012 by Aloysius the Gaul because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2012 @ 12:20 AM
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Aviation fuel: 12,712 million gallons


So that means it's adding about 17,000 million gallons of water a year to the atmosphere. Which seems like a lot, however the atmosphere normally contains 37.5 million billion gallons. Hence adding only 0.00005%

I mention this because some people suggest that all the water in the exhaust is "changing" the atmosphere.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 02:33 PM
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Originally posted by Aloysius the Gaul

US Statistics in fuel use by different types of transport per-annum since 1960


the link has changed - now at:US statistics in fuel use by different types of transportation per annum since 1960

edit on 27-2-2013 by Aloysius the Gaul because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by Aloysius the Gaul
 


now located via this page - look for Section B, Transportaion energy consumption by mode, table 4-5





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