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Antarctic Sea Ice Hits Record ... High?

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posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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Despite frequent headlines about a warming planet, melting sea ice, and rising oceans, climate analysts pointed to a seeming bright spot this week: During Southern Hemisphere winters, sea ice in the Antarctic, the floating chunks of frozen ocean water, is actually increasing. In fact, in late September, satellite data indicated that Antarctica was surrounded by the greatest area of sea ice ever recorded in the region: 7.51 million square miles (19.44 million square kilometers), the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center announced Thursday. Even so, it's a slow rate of growth—about one percent over last year—not nearly enough to offset melting in the Arctic, which broke records just weeks ago.

Link to source


So this is great news! All of our efforts to stop global warming have started to pay off! Wait, what? We haven't actually started to DO anything yet? Umm........Mr. Gore, .............anyone?..........

If you read the whole article, you will find some amazingly strange wording on how this report confirms that global warming is still an issue. Since I am just on the political side of this argument and only dis-believe in man made global warming due to being a republican, my opinion is null and void, but there is one burning question I need to know.

If the following is true:


How does this news relate to other studies showing that the melting of Antarctic continental ice is contributing to a rise in sea level? [Growing sea ice] has no effect whatsoever on sea level, because sea ice is already floating on the ocean. It does not displace sea level. It's frozen seawater, so whether it's frozen or liquid, it doesn't change the sea level.

Doesn't sea ice have the same affect be it Arctic or Antarctic?

Must be those damn republicans!




posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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While I dont think we should go spewing chemicals with reckless abandon into our environment, I also dont think we are the main cause(or even close) of the warming. I go with the sun cycles, it was just in a hotter than normal phase. And that is if it was even warmer. I am by no means qualified for something like this, but I can do more reading on it. There are plenty of great threads here, it seems.
Thanks for posting.
edit on 15-10-2012 by smashdem because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:14 AM
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reply to post by network dude
 


Doesn't sea ice have the same affect be it Arctic or Antarctic?
Yes. It does have the same effect on sea levels, which is none. It is melting ice which is on land (continental ice, not sea ice) which is the problem. As that paragraph quite clearly explains. Does the level of the liquid in your icey beverage rise when the ice in the glass melts?

The article also explains why warmer global temperatures cause more sea ice in the Antarctic.
edit on 10/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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William Cooper, didn't he predict an ice age in his book "Behold, a Pale Horse"?

Never could quite remember if the question mark is to be placed inside the quotation marks..



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:18 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


If you add ice to your drink then the level will rise.
If ice is above sea level then melts or breaks off then that would have some effect on levels.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by deadeyedick
 


When my husband gets into our jacuzzi a huge amount of water runs over the waterfall edge into the pool. I think it might be called displacement, hmm. Of course that doesn't happen when I get in!



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by deadeyedick
 


If ice is above sea level then melts or breaks off then that would have some effect on levels.

No.
If ice is floating (which is the definition of sea ice) it is displacing the same amount of water. It doesn't matter how much "above sea level" the top of it is.

edit on 10/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Interesting.
Would that be due to trapped oxygen?
I have heard all my life that you can determine the size of the part of an iceberg underwater by the size above water.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:27 AM
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If you look hard enough, you will find that the AGW crowd is blaming the increased Antarctic ice on AGW.

Yes, you read it right, they say that the increase in global temperatures has caused more ice to form in Antarctica.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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Originally posted by deadeyedick
reply to post by Phage
 


Interesting.
Would that be due to trapped oxygen?
I have heard all my life that you can determine the size of the part of an iceberg underwater by the size above water.
It is because ice is not as dense as water. That is why it floats in it.

You can approximate how much of an iceberg is below the water by looking at what is above. Approximately 7/8 of an iceberg is below water. Keep in mind, that is volume.
edit on 15-10-2012 by butcherguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:30 AM
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reply to post by deadeyedick
 


Would that be due to trapped oxygen?

Not exactly. Not "due to" it but trapped air would have the effect of making the berg float higher.
It's due to Archimedes' principle. en.wikipedia.org...



I have heard all my life that you can determine the size of the part of an iceberg underwater by the size above water.

In general you can. The more of an ice berg which is above the surface, the greater the part below. But if that ice berg melts it won't change the water level because that same amount of water is already being displaced.


edit on 10/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:41 AM
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This has nothing to do with facts, the elite want more power and more money. This is just another way to scare the liberals and the sheeple.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by network dude
 


Doesn't sea ice have the same affect be it Arctic or Antarctic?
Yes. It does have the same effect on sea levels, which is none. It is melting ice which is on land (continental ice, not sea ice) which is the problem. As that paragraph quite clearly explains. Does the level of the liquid in your icey beverage rise when the ice in the glass melts?

The article also explains why warmer global temperatures cause more sea ice in the Antarctic.
edit on 10/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I think the misunderstanding for rising waters from ice in the antarctic comes from the "possible" rising shore waters from the tidal waves that would be produced from some of these massive ice-shelf's collapsing....

I am honestly curious if some of those massive ice shelf's that are thousands miles collapse and separate wouldn't the following tidal wave be enough to produce some rising tides? at least temporarily? The analogy to this situation would be like dropping a handful of ice into a glass of water, yea it won't effect the total volume of water in the glass but it will produce enough force to possibly spill some over the sides essentially having the same effect as a overfilled glass of water...


edit on 15-10-2012 by Sly1one because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 11:56 AM
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I don't understand why it doesn't make a difference on the water levels if the ice is above or below the water line. If I have a glass or pitcher of water with ice cubes in it, and take a straw and gently push down on an ice cube, whether I push it all the way under water or just press it down a little, the water level in the glass gets higher. So why would'nt the the same thing happen in the ocean.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by Gridrebel
 


If I have a glass or pitcher of water with ice cubes in it, and take a straw and gently push down on an ice cube, whether I push it all the way under water or just press it down a little, the water level in the glass gets higher.

But we aren't talking about pushing ice underwater, we are talking about ice melting.

When you push down on the ice cube you are effectively adding weight to it so it displaces more water.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by Sly1one
 

That sort of "tsunami" would only affect the surface of the ocean. As such its effects would be very limited in range. By contrast, an undersea earthquake affects the entire water column above it.

edit on 10/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by network dude
 


Explanation: S&F!

I wonder if this sea ice adds more mass to the southern hemispheres polar region, since the sea turns to ice and is therefor somewhat stationary???


If yes, then what does that affect?

Could it possibly speed up earths rotation by moving ocean mass away from the equator to a lower and closer inward position , relative to earths spin, just like a skater bringing their arms in to spin faster?

Personal Disclosure: I used to figure ice skate and so the principle is familiar to me and so I wonder if it applies in this and or similar cases?



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 





Does the level of the liquid in your icey beverage rise when the ice in the glass melts?


Eureka!



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 12:36 PM
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Eventually Mother Nature will do something to either offset global warming or make it worse. A volcano eruption of significant proportion would change Earths climate in quick order. Probably Yellowstone Park. It is way overdue to erupt. A pole shift would have the opposite effect i think.



posted on Oct, 15 2012 @ 12:42 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by network dude
 


Doesn't sea ice have the same affect be it Arctic or Antarctic?
Yes. It does have the same effect on sea levels, which is none. It is melting ice which is on land (continental ice, not sea ice) which is the problem. As that paragraph quite clearly explains. Does the level of the liquid in your icey beverage rise when the ice in the glass melts?

The article also explains why warmer global temperatures cause more sea ice in the Antarctic.
edit on 10/15/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


As always, thanks for the wisdom. I am just perplexed by the way the article tries to explain why global warming would increase ice. I read it twice, and it seems to be doublespeak.

We were all warned of melting polar ice caps as being the death of us all, so it would seem to us dumb folks that more ice=good if less ice=bad.



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