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Interesting planetary alignment on Dec 21, 2012

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posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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reply to post by IndieA
 



hey OP you might be interested in the crop circles ( a few of them actually) that show diagrams of the planetary positioning at dec 21st 2012...





posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by stereologist
reply to post by KhufuKeplerTriangle
 


The Moon often passes in front of the Earth. So what?


the moon's gravitational force also causes massive oceanic tidal shifts and influences human reproductive systems.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 10:46 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 


influences human reproductive systems.
Really? I assume you are talking about the fact that menstruation tends to follow a roughly 28 day cycle (which varies). How does the moon do that? Are you claiming that women all menstruate at the same time?

The fact that the menstrual cycle roughly coincides with the orbital period of the Moon does not indicate that the human reproductive system is influenced by the gravitational influence of the Moon.
edit on 10/22/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:39 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by prevenge
 


influences human reproductive systems.
Really? I assume you are talking about the fact that menstruation tends to follow a roughly 28 day cycle (which varies). How does the moon do that? Are you claiming that women all menstruate at the same time?

The fact that the menstrual cycle roughly coincides with the orbital period of the Moon does not indicate that the human reproductive system is influenced by the gravitational influence of the Moon.
edit on 10/22/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



A 1979 study of 305 women found that approximately one-third of the subjects had lunar period cycles in length, i.e., a mean cycle length of 29.5 days plus or minus 1 day. Almost two-thirds of the subjects started their cycle in the brighter half of the lunar cycle, significantly more than would be expected by random distribution.[34] Another study found a statistically significant number of menstruations occurred around the new moon.[35]

en.wikipedia.org...

it's suggested - of course further study is in need but you get the point. there's a high correlation.. anyway.. this isn't what we're talking about... you can write up a different thread on it if you like. or join an already existing one.



posted on Oct, 22 2012 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 


this isn't what we're talking about

What were you talking about?
edit on 10/22/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 03:05 AM
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reply to post by IndieA
 


What gets me is all of the alignments that match up with large EQs.
The "alignments" he talks about are nothing special. They happen all the time. To say that the "alignments" cause earthquakes is about like saying flushing my toilet does.
edit on 10/23/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


I wouldn't say "cause" but I would say "might contribute to the occurrence of."



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:29 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by prevenge
 


this isn't what we're talking about

What were you talking about?
edit on 10/22/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)


I'm talking about the interaction of universal natural laws that we haven't fully explored en mass.
edit on 10/23/2012 by prevenge because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:33 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by IndieA
 


What gets me is all of the alignments that match up with large EQs.
The "alignments" he talks about are nothing special. They happen all the time. To say that the "alignments" cause earthquakes is about like saying flushing my toilet does.
edit on 10/23/2012 by Phage because: (no reason given)



maybe not just your toilet...

but many toilets at once... that's a different story
edit on 10/23/2012 by prevenge because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 

Originally posted by prevenge

A 1979 study of 305 women found that approximately one-third of the subjects had lunar period cycles in length, i.e., a mean cycle length of 29.5 days plus or minus 1 day. Almost two-thirds of the subjects started their cycle in the brighter half of the lunar cycle, significantly more than would be expected by random distribution.[34] Another study found a statistically significant number of menstruations occurred around the new moon.[35]

en.wikipedia.org...

it's suggested - of course further study is in need but you get the point. there's a high correlation.. anyway.. this isn't what we're talking about... you can write up a different thread on it if you like. or join an already existing one.

Only if you consider approximately 1/3 a high correlation.

There is no significant data that substansiates your claim. It's like flipping a coin 500 times, getting heads 450 times and tails 50 times. Then trying to state that a flipped coin tends to land on heads. It's just not true.

Mathematically a flipped coin's probability to land on heads or tails will always be 1/2.

With regards to the menstruational cycle of women, there are many factors (age, date of birth, heredity, diet and overall health) that determine when a woman begins her menstral cycle and when her cycle ends.


The average age of menarche in humans is 12–13 years, but is normal anywhere between ages 8 and 16. Factors such as heredity, diet and overall health can accelerate or delay menarche.[7] The cessation of menstrual cycles at the end of a woman's reproductive period is termed menopause. The average age of menopause in women is 52 years, with anywhere between 45 and 55 being common. Menopause before age 45 is considered premature in industrialised countries.[8] Like the age of menarche, the age of menopause is largely a result of cultural and biological factors;[9] however, illnesses, certain surgeries, or medical treatments may cause menopause to occur earlier than it might have otherwise.[10]



The word "menstruation" is etymologically related to "moon". The terms "menstruation" and "menses" are derived from the Latin mensis (month), which in turn relates to the Greek mene (moon) and to the roots of the English words month and moon.[69]

Some authors believe that, historically, women in traditional societies without nightlighting ovulated with the full moon and menstruated with the new moon,[70] and one author documents the controversial attempts to use the association to improve the rhythm method of regulating conception.[69][71]

Some studies in both humans[72] and other animals[73] have found that artificial light at night does influence the menstrual cycle in humans and the estrus cycle in mice (cycles are more regular in the absence of artificial light at night). It has also been suggested that bright light exposure in the morning promotes more regular cycles.[74] One author has suggested that sensitivity of women's cycles to nightlighting is caused by nutritional deficiencies of certain vitamins and minerals.[75]

A meta-analysis of studies from 1996 showed no correlation between the human menstrual cycle and the lunar cycle.[76][77][78][79][80][81] Dogon villagers did not have electric lighting and spent most nights outdoors, talking and sleeping; so they were an ideal population for detecting a lunar influence; none, however, was found.[82]]


Source

-saige-
edit on 23-10-2012 by saige45 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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I'm not for the alignment theory.

Every time I read something about 21 Decembrer 2012 I feel very curious, and I wait that date like a child wait for christmas morning.

But I heard so many theory about strange alignments that i think we all are missing what really is 21-12-2012.

Mayas didn't said anything about any catastrophical alignment. They didn't mentioned "ther will be peace (referring to symbol
) over the sky, and Earthquakes..." or such things. For them it was the end of a calculated era, like 4 before and no-one will know how many in the future. But this is not the thread to start talking about Mayas, don't want to be Off Topic.

I personally don't find anything that can be associated to 21-12-2012 in this alignment, our Solar System had tons of alignment in past that our Earth shouldn't exist anymore based on this theory.

Anyway, it remains a "creative" alignment



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by Ooahn
 


I think the whole 12/21/2012 has been hyped as a doomsday for a reason.

That reason being to deceive.

I do however, still find it interesting that the Maya knew so much about future celestial events, and I wonder if perhaps they did know something we don't about that end date.

Mainly, I thought the position of the planets that day were interesting and wanted to share.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by IndieA
 


I do however, still find it interesting that the Maya knew so much about future celestial events
Exactly what future celestial events did they know about? Something happening this December?



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by IndieA
 


I do however, still find it interesting that the Maya knew so much about future celestial events
Exactly what future celestial events did they know about? Something happening this December?


I heard they knew about the transit of venus that happened this year.

Also the solar eclipses and the sun, earth, and galactic center alignment, which I know happens every dec 21 plus or minus 5 or 10 years from 2012, but still.



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by IndieA
 

There is no indication that the Maya were aware of the transit of Venus or that they knew one would occur this year.

There is some indication that the Maya could predict the timing of solar eclipses but not with very high precision and no indication that they could predict the location of the eclipse.

During the approximately 33 years between November 10,755, and September 6, 788, all of teh 77 solar eclipses affecting the planet occurred within three days of dates appearing in the table. Although most of these eclipses did not affect the Maya area, the table itself provides a mechanism for recognizing and discounting irrelevant predictions.

www.jstor.org...

There is no alignment with the galactic center on December 21 or any other time.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by saige45
reply to post by prevenge
 

Originally posted by prevenge

A 1979 study of 305 women found that approximately one-third of the subjects had lunar period cycles in length, i.e., a mean cycle length of 29.5 days plus or minus 1 day. Almost two-thirds of the subjects started their cycle in the brighter half of the lunar cycle, significantly more than would be expected by random distribution.[34] Another study found a statistically significant number of menstruations occurred around the new moon.[35]

en.wikipedia.org...

it's suggested - of course further study is in need but you get the point. there's a high correlation.. anyway.. this isn't what we're talking about... you can write up a different thread on it if you like. or join an already existing one.

Only if you consider approximately 1/3 a high correlation.

There is no significant data that substansiates your claim. It's like flipping a coin 500 times, getting heads 450 times and tails 50 times. Then trying to state that a flipped coin tends to land on heads. It's just not true.

Mathematically a flipped coin's probability to land on heads or tails will always be 1/2.

With regards to the menstruational cycle of women, there are many factors (age, date of birth, heredity, diet and overall health) that determine when a woman begins her menstral cycle and when her cycle ends.


The average age of menarche in humans is 12–13 years, but is normal anywhere between ages 8 and 16. Factors such as heredity, diet and overall health can accelerate or delay menarche.[7] The cessation of menstrual cycles at the end of a woman's reproductive period is termed menopause. The average age of menopause in women is 52 years, with anywhere between 45 and 55 being common. Menopause before age 45 is considered premature in industrialised countries.[8] Like the age of menarche, the age of menopause is largely a result of cultural and biological factors;[9] however, illnesses, certain surgeries, or medical treatments may cause menopause to occur earlier than it might have otherwise.[10]



The word "menstruation" is etymologically related to "moon". The terms "menstruation" and "menses" are derived from the Latin mensis (month), which in turn relates to the Greek mene (moon) and to the roots of the English words month and moon.[69]

Some authors believe that, historically, women in traditional societies without nightlighting ovulated with the full moon and menstruated with the new moon,[70] and one author documents the controversial attempts to use the association to improve the rhythm method of regulating conception.[69][71]

Some studies in both humans[72] and other animals[73] have found that artificial light at night does influence the menstrual cycle in humans and the estrus cycle in mice (cycles are more regular in the absence of artificial light at night). It has also been suggested that bright light exposure in the morning promotes more regular cycles.[74] One author has suggested that sensitivity of women's cycles to nightlighting is caused by nutritional deficiencies of certain vitamins and minerals.[75]

A meta-analysis of studies from 1996 showed no correlation between the human menstrual cycle and the lunar cycle.[76][77][78][79][80][81] Dogon villagers did not have electric lighting and spent most nights outdoors, talking and sleeping; so they were an ideal population for detecting a lunar influence; none, however, was found.[82]]


Source

-saige-
edit on 23-10-2012 by saige45 because: (no reason given)



well the pineal, a photo-sensetive gland, which controlls our rythmic cycles in close communication with the pituitary..

I don't see why these people doing the studies aren't connecting those dots..



but then again..l if you, do not want to believe what i'm proposing.. then you will find research supporting your side of the argument.. obviously..and proclaim yourself the righteously correct one in the situation.

i however will do just the same and so there's really no point in communicating with one another
kthnx bye



posted on Oct, 23 2012 @ 10:22 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 


well the pineal, a photo-sensetive gland, which controlls our rythmic cycles in close communication with the pituitary..


But you said this:

the moon's gravitational force also causes massive oceanic tidal shifts and influences human reproductive systems.
What does that have to do with photosensitivity?



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 03:29 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by prevenge
 


well the pineal, a photo-sensetive gland, which controlls our rythmic cycles in close communication with the pituitary..


But you said this:

the moon's gravitational force also causes massive oceanic tidal shifts and influences human reproductive systems.
What does that have to do with photosensitivity?



well at certain lunar phases there's a more or less amount of reflected light ambiently distributed into our atmosphere. i speculate that if a study was done on metering women's pituitary/pineal activity during certain days of the month, in comparison to their menstural activity, one would find a relatively outstanding correlation in a bell curve grouping.

I speculate that celestial body's combined gravitational force and reflected light convening on the surface of our planet have a subtle influence on our biology.

that's what i speculate. I think it's a fascinating concept. If i were to design a species, i'd incorporate that aspect into the design. I also speculate that our DNA was designed.
we can argue more over this..

i'm just saying this is what i like to speculate upon. and there's no harm done. perhaps new areas of science will be uncovered, and we will see this as truth.. perhaps not.

i still think we have billions of years left of discovering and learning.. and these types of things would be included in them. I don't like walls that prohibit intuitive conceptualization of natural mechanics.... if you haven't guessed.



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 01:25 PM
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reply to post by prevenge
 

Originally posted by prevenge
well the pineal, a photo-sensetive gland, which controlls our rythmic cycles in close communication with the pituitary..

I don't see why these people doing the studies aren't connecting those dots..



but then again..l if you, do not want to believe what i'm proposing.. then you will find research supporting your side of the argument.. obviously..and proclaim yourself the righteously correct one in the situation.

i however will do just the same and so there's really no point in communicating with one another
kthnx bye

First, I never stated that I was the "righteously correct one".

Second, you made a statement essentially proclaiming that the lunar cycle and the menstruation cycle were linked while your source states that approximately 1/3 of the participants had exhibited menstruation periods in conjunction with the lunar cycle.

It is not necessary to take such a defensive posture.

Now your second proposal is that there may be a link between the pineal gland and the lunar cycle. It is nice to speculate and you place the blame on those conducting the study for not finding a link between the two. I would suggest that if you feel this strongly about the subject that you conduct your own experiments to determine if there is such a link.

I suspect, however, that since photosensitivity was taken into account;


Dogon villagers did not have electric lighting and spent most nights outdoors, talking and sleeping; so they were an ideal population for detecting a lunar influence; none, however, was found.[82]]


That you may be beating a dead horse.

Source

-saige-



posted on Oct, 24 2012 @ 04:21 PM
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Originally posted by saige45
reply to post by prevenge
 

Originally posted by prevenge
well the pineal, a photo-sensetive gland, which controlls our rythmic cycles in close communication with the pituitary..

I don't see why these people doing the studies aren't connecting those dots..



but then again..l if you, do not want to believe what i'm proposing.. then you will find research supporting your side of the argument.. obviously..and proclaim yourself the righteously correct one in the situation.

i however will do just the same and so there's really no point in communicating with one another
kthnx bye

First, I never stated that I was the "righteously correct one".

Second, you made a statement essentially proclaiming that the lunar cycle and the menstruation cycle were linked while your source states that approximately 1/3 of the participants had exhibited menstruation periods in conjunction with the lunar cycle.

It is not necessary to take such a defensive posture.

Now your second proposal is that there may be a link between the pineal gland and the lunar cycle. It is nice to speculate and you place the blame on those conducting the study for not finding a link between the two. I would suggest that if you feel this strongly about the subject that you conduct your own experiments to determine if there is such a link.

I suspect, however, that since photosensitivity was taken into account;


Dogon villagers did not have electric lighting and spent most nights outdoors, talking and sleeping; so they were an ideal population for detecting a lunar influence; none, however, was found.[82]]


That you may be beating a dead horse.

Source

-saige-



And I ... I looked through the pile of leaves searching for my lost pebble. I searched ONCE.. and gave up.
....my poor pebble...

where could it be.





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