My doctor put me on antidepressants

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posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 12:32 AM
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I was diagnosed for depression. It's a long story. It always is, isn't it?

The name of the medicine is Nortriptyline.

Does anyone have any experience with this drug or with other antidepressants, or any advice, cautions, opinions, etc.? Any input is welcomed.

I started it a little over 2 weeks ago so I don't really feel anything yet. I should be feeling something diffent soon I guess. Is my soul going to disappear?




posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 12:36 AM
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reply to post by KarensHoliday
 


I don't know that particular one, I have been on Sertraline and Citalopram, but you don't really see a cliff edge change anyway. Your moods and behaviour will slowly get better without you really noticing. Its only tempoary mind you, as soon as you stop the symptoms will return unless the original cause is dealt with.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 12:42 AM
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reply to post by KarensHoliday
 


in my experience pills are bullsh*t, and considering there is a pill for everything now only indicates that pill companies are good at making money, flush them down the toilet and pick up something more "natural", i let u figure out what im indicating when i say "natural". all i know is a smoke and a drink always pick me up when im feeling down and when im not feeling down it just makes me feel that much better.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by DocHolidaze
 


Thats the worst bit of advice I have ever read, ditch the medically perscribed drugs and smoke and drink instead. Are you for real? What qualifies you to say the medication doesn't work? and more to the point what qualifies you to tell the person to do the exact worst possible thing to do in this situation. Alcohol is a depressant you idiot.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 12:58 AM
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Originally posted by michael1983l
reply to post by DocHolidaze
 


Thats the worst bit of advice I have ever read, ditch the medically perscribed drugs and smoke and drink instead. Are you for real? What qualifies you to say the medication doesn't work? and more to the point what qualifies you to tell the person to do the exact worst possible thing to do in this situation. Alcohol is a depressant you idiot.



those medically prescribed drugs are just that, DRUGS, they can be abused just like anything else. and guess what most anti depressants and anti anxiety pills state in the side effects and warnings that they may cause depression so how is it any better. And furthermore alcohol may have physically depressing attributes, but how many people go down to the local pub or go hang with friends crack a six pact and sit around sad and depressed? they dont, a drink can be quite upliffting mentally and if you try and argue that point than you are a troll that i need not pay attention to.
edit on 13-10-2012 by DocHolidaze because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:00 AM
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reply to post by DocHolidaze
 


Right, so you have no qualification to back up what you said. Thought as much as it was the worst possible bit of advice ever known to mankind.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:00 AM
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Throw 'em away. If you don't, how about you read the entire insert of the possible side affects that pill could give you. I don't know the exact number but It's tens of thousands of ppl who die every year from these kinds of pills.
They've got a pill for everything though. I'm sure I could go see a Dr, tell them my hair keeps talking to me, i crave windshield washer fluid and I can't stop feeling like Im always happy and I promise, I would walk out of there with some kind of pill even though none of the things I said is true.
They push their drugs just like street dealers push their drugs, in the end they both want you hooked so you give them a fatter bank account.
We have emotions and we live with the different feelings at different times through out our entire lives, Id rather just deal with feeling bummed out rather than taking a pill that could make me more suicidal or homicidal.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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If you choose to try them,I wish you the best of luck, and hope they will give you the strenght to deal with your problems.

But do know that you might solve one problem, just to get a few new ones instead, strong addiction, brain damage and other fun things can happen, but worst of all, there is no way to say the pills will fix anything.

Be careful, and do not trust everything your doc says



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:02 AM
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My advice to you Karen is to listen to your doctor who spent 10+ years studying medicine, rather than some posters "feeling" on what "might" happen to you.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:03 AM
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reply to post by KarensHoliday
 


Get your Vitamin D levels checked. I thought I had depression as a result of PTSD and was on Zoloft for three years. Got a new shrink, she had my vitamin D leves checked, turned out they were deficient. I have to take vitamin D once a week now; but I was able to quit taking anti-depressants. Feel better than I have in years.

I



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:05 AM
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I admire your courage for taking that step to fulfill the endeavor of self preservation.I'm interested just as you are about effects....Take care,be happy



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:09 AM
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Side effects of antidepressant medication There are many different types of drugs used in the treatment of depression, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), atypical antidepressants, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Side effects are common in all antidepressants. For many people, the side effects are serious enough to make them stop taking the medication. Side effects of SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) The most widely prescribed antidepressants come from a class of medications known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The SSRIs include well-known antidepressants such as Prozac, Zoloft, and Paxil. Research suggests there is little difference in the effectiveness of these newer antidepressants, but there may be differences in side effects, cost, and how long the medication takes to work. The SSRIs act on a chemical in the brain called serotonin. Serotonin helps regulate mood, but it also plays a role in digestion, pain, sleep, mental clarity, and other bodily functions. As a result, the SSRI antidepressants cause a wide range of side effects, including:

Nausea Insomnia Anxiety Restlessness Decreased sex drive Dizziness Weight gain Tremors Sweating Sleepiness or fatigue Dry mouth Diarrhea Constipation Headaches Nausea Insomnia Anxiety Restlessness Decreased sex drive Dizziness Weight gain Tremors Sweating Sleepiness or fatigue Dry mouth Diarrhea Constipation Headaches

While some side effects go away after the first few weeks of drug treatment, others persist and may even get worse. In adults over the age of 65, SSRIs pose an additional concern. Studies show that SSRI medications may increase the risk for falls, fractures, and bone loss in older adults. The SSRIs can also cause serious withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking them abruptly..

Antidepressant risk factors Anyone who takes antidepressants can experience unpleasant or dangerous side effects. But certain individuals are at a higher risk: People over 65. Studies show that SSRI medications may increase the risk for falls, fractures, and bone loss in older adults. Pregnant women. The use of SSRI's late in pregnancy may lead to short-term withdrawal symptoms in newborns after delivery. Typical symptoms include tremor, restlessness, mild respiratory problems, and weak cry. Teens and young adults. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires all depression medications to include a warning label about the increased risk of suicide in children and young adults. People who may have Bipolar Disorder. The treatment for bipolar depression is different than for regular depression. In fact, antidepressants can actually make bipolar disorder worse or trigger a manic episode.

Antidepressant medication and suicide risk

There is a danger that, in some people, antidepressant treatment will cause an increase, rather than a decrease, in depression—and with it, an increased risk of suicide. While this is particularly true of children and young adults on antidepressant medication, anyone taking antidepressants should be closely watched for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The suicide risk is particularly great during the first one to two months of antidepressant treatment. Monitoring is especially important if this is the person’s first time on depression medication or if the dose has recently been changed. Signs that medication is making things worse include anxiety, insomnia, hostility, and extreme agitation—particularly if the symptoms appear suddenly or rapidly deteriorate. If you spot the warning signs in yourself or a loved one, contact your doctor or therapist immediately. If you are concerned that a friend or family member is contemplating suicide, see Understanding and Helping a Suicidal Person.
reply to post by michael1983l
 


edit on 13-10-2012 by DocHolidaze because: add link



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:11 AM
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A few years ago I went on Citalopram because of depression. I had asked the doctor if I could have a drink or two on them and he said yes as long as it was only one or two. One night after having only a glass of wine I got up and went to the kitchen counter and started to feel dizzy. on my way back to the couch I fell down and if my boyfriend had not been there would have passed out right there. I went off them right away. I also had bad experiences when I was a teenager on a different anti-depressant where I got into the fetal position on the floor and started rocking myself and feeling very unlike myself. In my opinion trying counseling is much better. or something natural. There is a natural vitamin that you can buy at GNC or the drug store called 5-HTP. It should not be used with other anti-depressants or St.John's wort. I have tried it and I liked it. you can check out more information on it by going to www.5htp.com. Good luck.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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Originally posted by KarensHoliday
I was diagnosed for depression. It's a long story. It always is, isn't it?

The name of the medicine is Nortriptyline.

Does anyone have any experience with this drug or with other antidepressants, or any advice, cautions, opinions, etc.? Any input is welcomed.

I started it a little over 2 weeks ago so I don't really feel anything yet. I should be feeling something diffent soon I guess. Is my soul going to disappear?



One of the side possible affects of ADs is interference with sexual functioning. For Females - an inability to reach orgasm. If it happens talk to your doctor. They don't tell you this one.

I suggest whenever you have this type of question type the words 'side effects' and then the drugs proper name, the one where it says 'contains' or 'active ingredients' into Google. Research is your friend.

P



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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You are headed in a good direction. I have struggled with depression for many, many years and have studied the different meds I have been prescribed in immense detail. Your specific med is part of an older class of antidepressants called tricyclics and are usually very, very safe. I personally believe they are as good a starting point for the treatment of your illness as possible. From my recollection, they probably also take the longest to get up and running. However, once they take hold, you should not only begin feeling better, but you will notice with Nortripyline that it will likely last all day long. I suspect your doctor set a follow up visit which you really need to keep about a month after the first prescription was issued. Let him/her know the results, and realize sometimes this takes a little patience either for the med to start working or to find a better one. There are some great doctors out there.

By the way, it took me a very long time to come to terms with the terminologies involved and what they meant in the long run. For instance, many people want to lump depression into the same group with multiple personality and psychopathic disorders. Don’t let anyone bully or belittle you.

Forgive me for rambling, but three very, very, very, very, etc pieces of advice you must look into: 1) never let any of us here give you actual medical advice. Anecdotal evidence and experiences are OK because our bodies and brains are all going to handle these things a little differently, 2) find out and be aware if your depression is "situational" as in a recent bad life event, or chemical in nature, as in chemical imbalance where your brain just needs to level out the dopamine, and 3) NEVER EVER listen to idiots who suggest medicines are universally wrong. I assure you, those words will never come from anyone who has ever experienced depression either personally or at close range through a good friend or family member.

I have seen multiple threads at ATS about similar situations, so be yourself, ask questions, and you should be aware there are some very well educated and willing to lend a shoulder. Good luck.

Best of luck.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:34 AM
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25 shocking facts about Pharmaceutical companys

to all the people that think pills are the way to go take a look at some of these facts and tell me they have your best interests at mind.

here are some highlights.


Your health care provider may have an ulterior motive behind your prescription: In 2007, the St. Petersburg Times reported that drug reps often give gifts to convince medical professionals to prescribe the medications that they represent. Dr. James P. Orlowski tries to teach his students that interaction with drug reps is not in the best interests of patients. Even though many doctors may believe solicitation from drug reps is unethical or at the very least impractical, gifts like free meals, pens, posters, books, and free samples are offered to physicians in an effort to influence their prescription practices.



Drug reps often have no medical or science education: Is it safe for physicians to assume that the professionals they meet with to discuss new medications and prescription recommendations for their patients actually have backgrounds in medicine or science? According to ABC News, it's not. A former drug rep for the pharmaceutical company Eli Lily, Shahram Ahari testified before Congress, saying that "pharmaceutical companies hire former cheerleaders and ex-models to wine and dine doctors, exaggerate the drug's benefits and underplay their side-effects." He also explained that he was taught "how to exceed spending limits for important clients...[by] using friendships and personal gifts" and to "exploit sexual tension."



Toxins found in drugs exported from China: A top story in the spring of 2007 centered around Zheng Xiaoyu, a Chinese drug czar who was sentenced to death "after admitting that he took bribes while running the country's Food & Drug Administration between 1998 and 2005," when he served as commissioner. According to The New York Times, "every year, thousands of people [in China] are sickened or killed because of rampant counterfeiting and tainted food and drugs."



Combined wealth of top 5 pharmaceutical companies outweighs GNP of sub-Saharan Africa.: Corporate Watch shows the public just how much wealth big pharmaceutical companies have, even on a global scale. Their report references The Guardian, which found that "the combined worth of the world’s top five drug companies is twice the combined GNP of all sub-Saharan Africa and their influence on the rules of world trade is many times stronger because they can bring their wealth to bear directly on the levers of western power."



Americans pay more for prescription meds than anyone else in the world: The Media Matters website analyzes a 60 Minutes interview between correspondent Bob Simon and then Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona. During the segment, Carmona maintains that Americans pay more for brand name prescriptions than anyone else in the world because of the hefty price associated with "the research and development of drugs." See point number 3 on this list, which points out that drug companies pay more on advertising and marketing than they do on research and development.



Some drug companies are taking advantage of underdeveloped countries to perform clinical trials: Wired.com reports that India is becoming a more attractive place for drug companies to run clinical trials and test out new drugs. The article explains, "more and more drug companies are conducting clinical trials in developing countries where government oversight is more lax and research can be done for a fraction of the cost." Controversy is starting to build over the trend, however, as one expert explains. Sean Philpott, managing editor of The American Journal of Bioethics, reveals to Wired.com that such practices may be unfair, as "individuals who participate in Indian clinical trials usually won't be educated. Offering $100 [as payment for their participation] may be undue enticement; they may not even realize that they are being coerced."


this one is a shocker though good for them, unless it was just a way to launder money


Pharmaceutical Companies donated millions to Hurricane Katrina relief programs: Americans are used to bashing pharmaceutical companies, just as they criticize health insurance companies, rising gas prices and monopolies. It may come as a shock, then, to discover the philanthropic efforts undertaken by big drug companies. Medical News Today writes that companies like Abbott, Eli Lilly, Merck, Pfizer and others have donated millions of dollars in cash and supplies to the Hurricane Katrina relief efforts.


its all a scam, kind like back in the day when traveling salesmen would stand up on there soapboxes and sell there new supreme elixir that will cure back pain and improve eyesight at the same time, now they set up in docter offices and sell there worthless pills.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by michael1983l
 


let me guess you work for a pharma company?



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 02:00 AM
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You are right about all of the issues. However, you cannot summarily assume that greed or some other selfish rationale rules the entire industry.

It does not, and even if it did, meds save people's lives.

I personally have an IQ that tested beyond the graph into genius, together with my wife we built a multimillion dollar business with offices in several states, I was often described by friends as one of the better multi-taskers, and I was capable of tackling any and all issues.

When my depression hit, I was blindsided. Without question, there was a shift in the chemical balance in my system just as if some platelets went haywire and created a cancer. Instead, my illness was in another part of the body. I take extreme offense to being told the meds can't help. Maybe you can tell me that and I can accept your viewpoint as simply different from mine. But when you tell the many, many others out there who can benefit from medicinal assistance that its all a scam you are being dangerously irresponsible.

Did I mention my wife and I lost everything? We were offered 7 figures for our business at one time and with my illness coupled with government interference, I was reduced to the same catatonic state I saw mentioned in another post here. Another thing you are right about, though, is that many medicines are wrong for many patients. They may have the exact same symptoms but need a different medication because of the specific manner bodies metabolize them. If it were as simple as waving a wand or just prescribing the correct antibiotic the first time, my 12 year old son would still have a more secure future and I would know I could care for my family the way I want to.

All this comes to the fact that I can, without reservation, assure you that the correct medication can do wonders and like any other illness the wrong meds either do not help or can do more damage. A good doctor knows how to manage and supervise and can get their patients through this maze carefully and as quickly and safely as possible. Frankly, i don't care if they only want to make themselves rich. If I could possibly describe the depraved depths of the depression I have endured and what I have put my family through, I'm willing to work with doctors as they tweak my treatment. Believe me, there is an IMMENSE difference between meds and their effects, and when we find something that helps it is obvious.

Please try and be more understanding. I sincerely understand why you believe what you do, but I encourage you to consider that your stance could be in error so you can help those of us who have experienced this terrible situation lend needed assistance to others who need our help.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 02:15 AM
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reply to post by samstone11
 


Well said. There is a mental health issue called "all or nothing thinking'. As the name implies it occurs when people only see issues in black and white / all or nothing. It is a pretty important issue to get under control.

The truth is usually somewhere in the middle!

P



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 02:36 AM
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While I would not try and influence somones decisions in such a matter.....I would be very careful with these things, and try a more "holistic" approch first as other's have suggested....there's a reason they name all the possible "side affects" in the constanst commercials and ads for these things....

I hope you feel better soon......
edit on 13-10-2012 by MountainLaurel because: (no reason given)





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