Top neurosurgeon 'spent six days in heaven' during a coma

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posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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His forthcoming book, "Proof of Heaven, A Neurosurgeon journey into the Afterlife" that aims to dispel the skepticism will be published by Simon & Schuster later this month.





posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 11:53 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 


Awesome. I can't wait to read it. I hope it explains the science that he understood before hand, and explains his new idea after the experience. Which will most likely be the entire book; will make good argumentative study material.
edit on 8-10-2012 by milkyway12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:00 AM
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you unbelievers...I'm ashamed of you...
refuse to be a victim of the one who lies to you....man up ...and refuse to be a victim, you are being robbed of something really easy on the stressload.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:28 AM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 


If he seen it, why did he come back? It couldn't be that bad up there, could it? I call bullsh!t



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by DarkKnight21
 




The fact that there was no brain activity for 6 days... is interesting to me.

If there is a natural explanation for this, I would think a neurosurgeon would be the first to know.


When it comes to things like this... even a brain surgeon would be discounted by people who believe consciousness arises from the material brain.


edit on 9-10-2012 by sk0rpi0n because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:39 AM
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reply to post by sk0rpi0n
 


Sorry, when this dude come around, he would of had enough time to think up a story. It would be interesting to find out when he actually mentioned his experience after coming out of the coma. Was it the first thing he spoke about? Was it a couple of days after when he re-gathered his thoughts a bit? Did he just make it up a week or so later? Is he doing it to make a few extra bucks on his book?
edit on 9-10-2012 by DarknStormy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:42 AM
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Originally posted by milkyway12
reply to post by boncho
 


Awesome. I can't wait to read it. I hope it explains the science that he understood before hand, and explains his new idea after the experience. Which will most likely be the entire book; will make good argumentative study material.
edit on 8-10-2012 by milkyway12 because: (no reason given)


Or a good revenue stream....



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by DarknStormy
 




Sorry, when this dude come around, he would of had enough time to think up a story. It would be interesting to find out when he actually mentioned his experience after coming out of the coma. Was it the first thing he spoke about? Was it a couple of days after when he re-gathered his thoughts a bit? Did he just make it up a week or so later? Is he doing it to make a few extra bucks on his book?


I can understand if he was some over-zealous christian.

The thing is, he is a man of science, that too a neurosurgeon. If it makes sense to take the words of scientific people more seriously than the words of religious people... then go all the way and accept his account of what he experienced regardless of how it stands with your point of view.

As for making a "few extra bucks" off a book.... I don't buy it. I'm guessing neurosurgeons get paid a LOT.... or he could have just written a book on neurosurgery.

About the other questions you asked, lets just wait for the book.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 01:59 AM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 


He's about to publish a book. It's all about money. They want you to buy it!



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 02:27 AM
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While reading this my mind was weighing up the possibilities of what was written in the article. Then getting to the end of the article finding out they are plugging his book right at the end, just makes me think its another guy trying to make money writting a book on something everyone wants to know.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 02:31 AM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 


Originally posted by Agit8dChop
... when my PC blue screens i can quite clearly see the blue screen, but there's no HDD activity happening!


Using your metaphor, the brain is the HDD and the RAM is the device displaying the BSOD.

This is just a shot in the dark but using your own example, there might be parts of our existance completely independent of our brains.

Maybe we also have a BIOS or RAM. If RAM was like conciousness, once the power goes out it resets. Like death. Who knows, interesting metaphor.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by AQuestion
 


Awesome way to put that all.

I have no proof either way of NDE but I wonder why some are so strongly against it? Some say it is because we are afraid to die. There is nothing after we die. Zero. I say: what is so scary about that? Flick the off switch and go to sleep. Big deal.

As a person of faith, I do believe there is something afterwards. Now that is scary stuff



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 03:08 AM
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no comment
edit on 9-10-2012 by WiindWalker because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by dominicus
Like the doc said, and ive been saying for the last decade, the current materialist model of brain and consciousness has cracks in its old arse foundation. Peaking through those cracks is a ripe spiritual reality which will eventually be quantified by science, unless the atheist bias goes out of its way to scoff and label as psuedo, anything "they" don't want investigated, for the sake of keeping alive the status quo.


'Old foundation'?

I have reason to believe that magical thinking about the brain is much more common and much older than the current materialistic view of human existence in its current form.

If science can somehow observe and measure these experiences in a repeatable way then it will, and will report back on them. Science by its very nature is materialistic given it observes things that can be measured. Not sure you can blame atheists for this separation.

As an atheist I can calmly say this wouldn't bring the world crashing down around my tiny ears.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 03:25 AM
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Originally posted by CaptainBeno
Ok?? I guess It's time to believe?

I don't think so.

To him, his own experience may be more important than that of all other people before him that have had similar experiences, but to me it's just one more.

The fact is that he (or any other scientist) doesn't really know what was happening, so he shouldn't treat his own experience as if it had more weight as an evidence (which it does not).



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 03:36 AM
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reply to post by ABNARTY
 


Dear ABNARTY,

I cannot worry about what others think about NDEs. I have no more understanding about what it is like to be in Africa than a non-believer has to understands what an NDE is like. They can think anything they want; but, it is just that, their imagination. They imagine that they don't exist, that is the definition of insanity. I like it.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 03:46 AM
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I do believe that there is a soul and there is part that continues existence after death.
But!
A) Coma is not death.
B) Nobody goes to hell anymore
? All near death experience guys describe heaven,so i suspect it is some form of trauma managing mechanism of the brain.
But who knows, i could be wrong.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 04:11 AM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 




Anyhow, in a dream, you can live a week in a few minutes before waking up


Time dilation (and compression) can also be induced with hypnosis. There was a paper some time ago about Chinese scientists working in perfecting this with addition of simple triggers as a way to increase problem solving capabilities.

Considering that time does in fact seem not to exist and be interconnected to space, and we are still arguing what space is I agree with the view expressed by some on the thread that consciousness (in its broader terms) experimentation can be a short path to really interesting discoveries, it reminds me some interesting experiences done with architects and physicist IIRC with '___'. A multitude of drugs and the creative minds have always been connected.

This is not a pro-drug stance (even if I do not object to increased liberalization of natural drugs, with the exception of opium).



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 04:22 AM
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reply to post by alienreality
 


Absolutely true his physical mind was doing nothing as the machine that goes "ping "said so.
So how do you account for the memories, may be proof for a true out of body experience by his soul.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 04:30 AM
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I am always bemused by the term near-death and I think people confuse it with death. Near-death is when a person comes perilously close to death but does not die. I believe the experience of the doctor who is the topic of this thread - had a near-death experience. His brain may not have been active but I bet his heart was still pumping the blood around his body. As long as the heart is pumping - you are alive aren't you????

When people ask me about my experience I always refer to it as my death experience. My heart stopped and I slipped away. I was away for only a few minutes as I was already in the back of an ambulance - so help was instant. I chose to come back. All I can say is beautiful and peaceful. As an artist I have tried to sketch my experience.

What the doctor describes is very visual. All I really know is that I experienced a sense of peace that I have never experienced here on earth - I wish I could have brought the 'peace' back with me to share. I spoke to my doctor about my experience and he states some people come back and their life takes on new meaning but others - it's as if it was just another day and their life remains unchanged.

Much Peace...





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