Top neurosurgeon 'spent six days in heaven' during a coma

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posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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Originally posted by SaturnFX
From the article:

His forthcoming book


Book? so he has actual proof of an afterlife, and instead of sharing this freely on the net, and altering the entire worlds view...
he wants to cash in.

Guess heaven has gotten lax in its messaging.

Anyhow, in a dream, you can live a week in a few minutes before waking up.

Mom had a NDE...and she didn't see streaming transparent people..she seen solid people, and she wasn't in fluffy cloudville..she was on a beach. So..ya.

But by all means, read the book.


As much as it may not be accepted by some, it will reach far more people if its published in a book, (and in a monied world he gets paid for this) and then later comes out in low cost kindle, and free pdf form, than if its just a document kicking around online.




posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 


Dear CaptainBeno,

An NDE is only meaningful to the one who has it, I have had it. I do not discuss the specifics because there is no way that someone else can understand it, they are individual. We do not need to prove the NDE to prove that their is consciousness in the universe. There is sentience in the universe, the physical is what cannot prove. We must assume the physical is real; but, it is just an assumption. We perceive reality, reality does not perceive us, the rock does not understand us. We assume it is real and give it meaning, without us it has none.

You are self aware today, if you died tomorrow, the physical universe would be meaningless to you if you did not continue. The rocks don't matter, you do, whether you survive after physical death or not, you matter because you experience that which is "solid". People are afraid of accepting NDEs because it means that other people matter when they just want to look out for themselves. God does not reject us, we reject him, we choose to be all that is in our perception and minimize the importance of other sentient beings, consider Romney.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:42 PM
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Ha! i'll bite!

he says noone has ever experienced other dimensions before? hahahahaha ok laughter ended.

ill send him an email. see how he likes that claim challenged?



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by Unity_99

Originally posted by SaturnFX
From the article:

His forthcoming book


Book? so he has actual proof of an afterlife, and instead of sharing this freely on the net, and altering the entire worlds view...
he wants to cash in.

Guess heaven has gotten lax in its messaging.

Anyhow, in a dream, you can live a week in a few minutes before waking up.

Mom had a NDE...and she didn't see streaming transparent people..she seen solid people, and she wasn't in fluffy cloudville..she was on a beach. So..ya.

But by all means, read the book.


As much as it may not be accepted by some, it will reach far more people if its published in a book, (and in a monied world he gets paid for this) and then later comes out in low cost kindle, and free pdf form, than if its just a document kicking around online.


he still has no clue how to induce it manually.. nor the full spectrum of biology associated with it.. so much more



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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reply to post by 0mage
 


That isn't quite an NDE, but an OBE, and he could probably learn with a good pdf, such as Astral Dynamics, for example.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by CaptainBeno


Ok?? I guess It's time to believe?


You are free to beleive any time you like.


I gotta say I am quite taken back by his claims and to be honest quite scared?


I gotta say I am unimpressed by his claims and don't really give a fig.

the mind can imagine all sorts of things, and IMO what he has is whatever he can remember from whatever random patterns his mind wandered through during the coma.

so what?
edit on 8-10-2012 by Aloysius the Gaul because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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Seven days in heaven, and all the article could manage was this?


Though his chances of survival were low, he awoke from the coma seven days later and began describing an ‘other worldly experience’.

"I was in a place of clouds. Big, puffy, pink-white ones that showed up sharply against the deep blue-black sky," he wrote in an article for Newsweek.

He also goes on to describe "Flocks of transparent, shimmering beings arced across the sky, leaving long, streamer-like lines behind them."


That sucks!
The devil is in the...
uh...
I mean...

Heaven is in the details?



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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I was intrigued, until It said

His forthcoming book, "Proof of Heaven, A Neurosurgeon journey into the Afterlife" that aims to dispel the skepticism will be published by Simon & Schuster later this month.

Then I was like pff... book promotion. Figures.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:01 PM
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I agree with the details, but then they seem to relate to not being passed over or even a full NDE yet, so his coma was possibly not very deep, because some coma states are true NDE's and those who experience 7 months or 3 years in coma and then awake have been crossed over and sent back, some come and go, I've read many different ways these things occur. He was in the tangible world, with sheer type beings? Clouds?



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:02 PM
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Your suggesting that evolutionary adaptations developed in humans overtime to ease a person into death, so as not to alarm them. Why even bother with such a mechanism when lights out and then nothing is quicker from an evolutionary perspective?

Of course, having had an OBE myself, it became a personal experience and put into the known category, which is something people will have to experience for themselves someday.



Originally posted by Moneyisgodlifeisrented
honestly just break it down simply,
when you pass on, you need to make it somewhat easy, on you that is.
What if you need to do something, and death isn't the end, you'd have all these beings completely flipping out, loosing themselves everywhere, would be utter hell...

But if you have an idea of things, it's more easier for you to listen and follow directions in a calm state.

So, i think he saw exactly what he, HIMSELF was meant too, meaning we all will see what we envision it to be I believe, since that would be the most logical way to be at ease for something not normally so.

make sense? prolly not, carry on.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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Originally posted by jacobe001
Your suggesting that evolutionary adaptations developed in humans overtime to ease a person into death, so as not to alarm them. Why even bother with such a mechanism when lights out and then nothing is quicker from an evolutionary perspective?


It makes sense, but you have to think about it deeper.

First off, not all people who have these experiences die. That's why it's called a near death experience! Also, if they do, they don't always do so alone.

How many times have you heard of someone smiling in awe as they pass. How many stories do we have of people who come back from "the other side". How much of these experiences go on to create cultural/religious constructs which helped our species when we were oh so curious, yet lacking in understanding, therefore experiencing quite a bit of fear?

You see, lets say two groups of people exist. One has a genetic mutation present which allows a small percentage to have these experiences, and the other doesn't. Over time the group who is able to have these experiences, will transfer this information to the group and create beliefs which help the group be more resilient to various existential crisis. This would give a buffer to other stresses as well.

So the group most fit to survive of the two would be the one which has the funky experiences, and builds the cultural/religious constructs. The group that didn't died out. Viola, evolutionary adaptation...at least it was. Now a days, the phooey religion seems to cause more suffering than good. It's obsolete.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:17 PM
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I rarely buy in to these near-death/out-of-body experiences, but this man's testimony is interesting.

The fact that there was no brain activity for 6 days... is interesting to me.

If there is a natural explanation for this, I would think a neurosurgeon would be the first to know.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:38 PM
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reply to post by CaptainBeno
 

One book I found very convincing is Melvin Morse's book Closer to the Light.

Melvin Morse was a Paediatrician who recorded and reseached the NDE's of children.

www.amazon.com...

edit on 8/10/12 by troubleshooter because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:53 PM
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reply to post by jacobe001
 

That's the only thing that makes me think there might be some validity to these experiences. Why the hell would nature give a god damn about your comfort level when you died? It seems absolutely pointless.

Originally posted by moniesisfun
You see, lets say two groups of people exist. One has a genetic mutation present which allows a small percentage to have these experiences, and the other doesn't. Over time the group who is able to have these experiences, will transfer this information to the group and create beliefs which help the group be more resilient to various existential crisis. This would give a buffer to other stresses as well.

So the group most fit to survive of the two would be the one which has the funky experiences, and builds the cultural/religious constructs. The group that didn't died out. Viola, evolutionary adaptation...at least it was. Now a days, the phooey religion seems to cause more suffering than good. It's obsolete.

And (no insult intended) but this is just stretching it, plain and simple. Just for the record I don't even follow any kind of organized religion, but this is just grasping at straws.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Xaphan
And (no insult intended) but this is just stretching it, plain and simple. Just for the record I don't even follow any kind of organized religion, but this is just grasping at straws.


None taken. It makes perfect sense to me! If you would like to further explain why you think this couldn't come about, I'll take it in.

Let me put it this way, at one point in our history we had a major famine, and those who had the inability to synthesize ascorbic acid via a mutated L-gulonolactone oxidase gene survived, and virtually all of us no longer have this ability. The difference amounted to some extra 2% glucose stores in our reserves.

It worked out well for our species for a long time, because it's thought we lived largely off of foods abundant in vitamin c. Now a days, it's thought that diseases such as cancer and heart disease are partially the result of this lack. We still survive long enough to procreate and raise our children, but not as well as if we had this gene still functioning.

You can apply the same to this situation. Something that gave us an edge, so it was passed on. That edge is no longer a reality. Something so seemingly subtle can make such a huge difference!
edit on 8-10-2012 by moniesisfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 11:45 PM
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Like the doc said, and ive been saying for the last decade, the current materialist model of brain and consciousness has cracks in its old arse foundation. Peaking through those cracks is a ripe spiritual reality which will eventually be quantified by science, unless the atheist bias goes out of its way to scoff and label as psuedo, anything "they" don't want investigated, for the sake of keeping alive the status quo.

I wonder what the main underlying motivation is, in a skeptic hoping in all their might for the,soul and after life to not be true.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 11:48 PM
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reply to post by Agit8dChop
 


I just don't think you agree with the experts if they do not match your "expert" opinion. Forget that you would have thrown his papers in our face before this event, now you disown him because his "expert" opinion doesn't match your opinion you so expertly acquired on your remarkable interweb science extravaganza.

Granted, if a paster came out and said there is no god, I would disown him too. However, what your science pointed out to be impossible to occur, occurred and witnessed by one of your leading "science" figures of awesomeness. Sad day indeed.
edit on 8-10-2012 by milkyway12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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reply to post by milkyway12
 


who said what in the where now?
Never said I was an expert, that was just my opinion.


Something wrong with me thinking for myself out loud instead of believing this clieche '' near death '' experience story by a man wanting to sell a book?

heaven in my mind doesn't exist as a place people gather (or souls)
heaven in my mind is what your personal belief is, therefore when you die, your mind wanders to that piece of memory you always allocated for 'heaven'

People are allowed their own versions of heaven, so why are you having a go at me for stating how i think it works?
edit on 8-10-2012 by Agit8dChop because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by dominicus
I wonder what the main underlying motivation is, in a skeptic hoping in all their might for the,soul and after life to not be true.


Reason.






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