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Hardtack, Sailors diet, and other civil war recipes

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posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 12:44 PM
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Here ya go.. for the times coming.
I do some of this when camping so you can fit the recipes to meet your situation.

Sailor's Diet

2 1/2 cups old-fashioned or quick oats.
3 cups unbleached flour.
1 1/2 teaspoons salt.
1 teaspoon baking soda.

In a separate container, mix:

1 1/2 cups buttermilk.
3 tablespoons honey.
1/2 cup melted bacon drippings or shortening.

Combine the two sets of ingredients. When the dough is thoroughly mixed, roll it out on a floured board to a thickness of about a quarter inch. Cut out circles of dough with a large drinking glass dipped in flour and put them on a lightly greased cookie sheet. Bake for about 5 1/2 minutes at 450° F. Let the hardtack cool on a wire rack before serving with jam or jelly.

Idiots Delight
SO easy an idiot can make it.. and yeah, thats the real name!
1 c. brown sugar
1 c. raisins
1 tbsp. butter
1 tsp. vanilla
4 c. water
7 tbsp. butter
1/2 c. white sugar
2 tsp. baking powder
1/2 c. milk
1 c. flour

Boil together the first 5 ingredients. Make a batter of the second 5 ingredients. Drop the batter in a greased pan by spoonfuls. Pour first mixture over it and bake in a moderate oven until golden brown.


Army Hardtack Recipe

Ingredients:

4 cups flour (perferably whole wheat)
4 teaspoons salt
Water (about 2 cups)
Pre-heat oven to 375° F
Makes about 10 pieces

Mix the flour and salt together in a bowl. Add just enough water (less than two cups) so that the mixture will stick together, producing a dough that won’t stick to hands, rolling pin or pan. Mix the dough by hand. Roll the dough out, shaping it roughly into a rectangle. Cut into the dough into squares about 3 x 3 inches and ½ inch thick.

After cutting the squares, press a pattern of four rows of four holes into each square, using a nail or other such object. Do not punch through the dough. The appearance you want is similar to that of a modern saltine cracker. Turn each square over and do the same thing to the other side.

Place the squares on an ungreased cookie sheet in the oven and bake for 30 minutes. Turn each piece over and bake for another 30 minutes. The crackers should be slightly brown on both sides.

The fresh crackers are easily broken but as they dry, they harden and assume the consistentency of fired brick.

Hardtack Recipe by Kathy Kleiman (MCHA Co. E)



6 parts flour
1 part water

Knead dough until thoroughly mixed. Roll out on a floured surface until about 1/8 inch thick (or there abouts). Cut into squares--there is an actual size piece of hardtack pictured in Hard Tack & Coffee by Billings (p. 114 in my edition), seems to be about 2 3/4 by 3 1/2 inches. His piece of hardtack was small and I've seen larger ones. Probably due to whatever
contractor made the hard tack.

Pierce the hard tack 13 times with the tip of a knife, making sure hole goes all the way through the dough. The Tinsmiths sutler makes a hardtack "cookie" mold that is just great for this. They advertise in the CW News.

Bake at 325 for at least an hour, turning over the hard tack once. Check to see that it is cooked through completely. Take out & let cool overnight to get that real hard & dry feeling. Some people bake at 300 for a couple of hours, just to get it real dry. The finished hard tack will still look pale.




posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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Hard tack link with video. Its a survival food that lasts some time.
www.survivalnewsonline.com...




Old Fashioned Sailors Duff

2 tbsp. shortening
2 tbsp. sugar
1 egg
1/2 c. molasses
1 1/2 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp. soda
1/2 c. boiling water
1 tsp. vanilla

Mix in order named. Fill coffee can 2/3 full. Set in a partially filled pan of water and steam in oven until a knife comes out clean when inserted in center. Bake at 350 degrees.



This Army recipe is meant to tamp down the strong flavor of the meat. Adapted from the 1910 Manual for Army Cooks
blespoons butter
2 1/2 tablespoons flour
5 cups beef stock
1 1/2 pounds beef hearts, halved and rinsed well
1 (14 ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 cup chopped onion
1/2 teaspoon cloves
1/2 teaspoon allspice
1 bay leaf
1 clove garlic, minced
Salt and pepper, to taste


Prep: 10 mins | Cook: 1 hour 10 mins
1.
Melt butter in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onions and cook for 5 minutes, then add flour and cook for 2 minutes.
2.
Gradually add the beef stock. Bring to a boil and add tomatoes, onions, cloves, allspice, bay leaves, garlic, pepper, and salt.
3.
Stir in the beef hearts. Cover and simmer for 1 hour, until beef hearts are tender and have reached at least 180 degrees F internally.
edit on 8-10-2012 by Advantage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 12:48 PM
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Anyone want Pemmican recipes? Fry Bread recipes?? I am Blackfeet, so I dont know if this is your thing, but I have a bunch of family trail food recipes. I have so much to share.. sometimes I dont know what folks want. I have a literal terra full of recipes gathered, my fam recipes, survival and thrival info, video, and recipes.. plus instructions and schematics. I just really dont know where to start, but wanted to share a bunch.
Food seemed the most important to start considering that the food prices in my area are going wacko. Let me know.. here or in PM.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 

Thanks for posting these, I plan on trying some of those hard tack recipes this winter, it's good to know some of these ways to make long shelf life items just in case..

As for recipe requests?

I'll take all you care to share



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


I don't even know what pemmican is, although I have seen it mentioned in books..I'd love to see your recipe...and fry bread.....sound really good....

Thanks for sharing all these recipes......



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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Originally posted by JacKatMtn
reply to post by Advantage
 

Thanks for posting these, I plan on trying some of those hard tack recipes this winter, it's good to know some of these ways to make long shelf life items just in case..

As for recipe requests?

I'll take all you care to share




You asked for it you know! LOL! Youll love the pemmican recipe I have. Pemmican lasts a long time and I have some canned meat instructions. Id had luck with canning some salmon and things. OIh an I know its on this drive Im attempting to organize.. but I have several more hardtack recipes. Seems that immigrants who fought in the civil war and indian wars had other ideas about the bland regular hardtack.
Oh and have you ever heard of Depuyer?? If not, you will real soon. LOL!


The husband was transferred to Il and I havent found a decent bison source, but ordered it from Mo or went to the farm up until this yr.. the prices skyrocketed.
Im sure you can substitute beef for the bison meat. WIth us the Pemmican is the base food when with other ones they use breads mostly. Ill give the blender recipe but it should be easy to figure out how to shred and pound without a blender.
If I can get a non sick deer this yr, Im doing a bunch with venison.

1 LB of pemmican = 5 lb of meat. In bad winter times you use the berries and bison ( or beef) bones alone.

lean meat like elk, buffalo, or beef I guess would work,
animal fat ( we blackfeet require more fats in our diet than others) or suet
berries.,. you can use juniper, cherries, crans.. whatever seedless
Here is some guys recipe with some pics.. www.grandpappy.info...

My recipe:
I do the same basically ( use rendered fat) but add in honey and nuts... and I have a real addiction to juniper berries.
Just make SURE things are DRIED and not cooked or almost dry. It wont last if you dont make sure and youll get sick. This is a food that can last out of refrig or etc for a LONG time. I figure I could live off of pemmican, frybread and hardtack. LOL!! I also Dry my meats before grinding until they are dry and actually break. Makes the pemmican last longer.




Saskatoon Pemmican Recipe

1 c Jerky; beef or venison
1 c Dried Saskatoon berries or dried blueberries
1 c Unroasted sunflower seeds or crushed nuts of any kind
2 ts Honey
1/4 c Peanut butter
1/2 ts Cayenne [optional]

This version uses peanut butter rather than melted suet or lard as the
binding agent, which is more palatable for today's health conscious
diets.

Grind [or pound -JW] the dried meat to a mealy powder. Add the dried
berries and seeds or nuts. Heat the honey, peanut butter and cayenne
until softened. Blend. When cooled, store in a plastic bag or sausage
casing in a cool dry place. It will keep for months.
















edit on 8-10-2012 by Advantage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 01:31 PM
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Originally posted by DontTreadOnMe
reply to post by Advantage
 


I don't even know what pemmican is, although I have seen it mentioned in books..I'd love to see your recipe...and fry bread.....sound really good....

Thanks for sharing all these recipes......



No problem. Hope you can try em or print em off for if.. when.. you need them.

Now, Depuyer is an acquired taste.. but when youre hungry or eating nose to tail youll need this recipe. I dont even know if others eat this part of hte animal. I only know some other Blackfeet, halfa-Cherokee, Sioux and pretendians.


Depuyer is this fat sort of stuff you get off a bison backbone. That hump thing. You clean it of with water and you can do it all at once if you have a huge fryer... or cut it up. You take that fat thing and dip it in the hot grease to fry it for like less than a minute or so... just to crust the surface a bit. Sort of like browning it so your hook wont slide through and you walk out to the smoke house to find your fat on the floor.
SO you take it and hang it to smoke for maybe half a day or little more depending on if youre using a house or one of those metal smoker thingies. Its a good food and lasts forever if youre camping or hunting or hiking or whatever. Its sort of sweet. I used to put some seasoning on it or tabasco or whatever you like.

SInce there is no more free range hunting of bison for everyone, you can usually get this cheap or free from a farm or butcher attached to the bison farms cause no one really remembers or eats this stuff anymore. I havent even seen this in those handy dandy " fer real indian recipes" books you buy at gift shops in Browning.
Probably because the history is lost and not marketable, but this was an absolute winter staple.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 01:41 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


Excellent thread. I think you really should cross-post this thread in the Survival Forum. Both threads would garner a lot more input, much needed info, from both places.....


Des



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by Advantage
 


Excellent thread. I think you really should cross-post this thread in the Survival Forum. Both threads would garner a lot more input, much needed info, from both places.....


Des


Over the yrs Ive tried putting things in the survival sections. Unfortunately seems real survival foods are found here more readily since that section is cluttered up by.. hooey.


Id read a post of yours earlier today in the survival section.. wanted to share this with you specifically


www.hort.purdue.edu...

In past discussions and even in chat when the show is on.. folks think they cant find "food".. eve discuss cannibalism.. for real seriously! Nahh, food is EVERYWHERE.
edit on 8-10-2012 by Advantage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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Wagmiza Wasna
I think this is Sioux Cookies..

Chewy on the inside, crisp on the outside.


2 cups yellow cornmeal

1 cup oil

1 cup raisins

1/3 cup brown sugar



Direction: Toast cornmeal in skillet - stirring to prevent burning. Heat oil. Grind raisins and mix with hot oil. Add browned cornmeal and sugar. Stir together and press onto a cookie sheet. Leave on cookie sheet until cook. Eat by the handful, like candy.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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FOR AHABSTAR.... now I love the hell out of Ahab, but we have a differing opinon on Cattails.. and their being suitable as a food. Since I ridiculed him last yr I have had a change of heart since I found a bunch more recipes.



Cattail Casserole

3 cups cattail flowerbuds, scraped off the “cobs” (about 40 flowerheads)
1 egg
¼ tsp nutmeg
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp black pepper
½ cup milk
1 cup soft breadcrumbs
1 cup grated cheese

1. Cook cattail flowerheads in boiling water for 5-10 minutes.
2. Scrape the flowerbuds off the cob to make 3 cups.
3. Beat egg together with spices, milk and breadcrumbs.
4. Combine cattail flowers with the egg mixture.
5. In a greased bread pan or small casserole dish, spread half of cattail mixture on the bottom.
6. Add half of the grated cheese, spread the rest of the cattail mixture over, and top with the rest of the grated cheese.
7. Bake at 350° until lightly browned, about 30 minutes.


Cattail Flower Griddle Cakes makes about 12- 2" cakes

2 large eggs
1 T milk
2 T flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 c. cattail flower spike pulp
1 T minced sweet red pepper
1 T minced glasswort
1/2 tsp salt
pinch of pepper

garnish with sour cream and glasswort

1. Mix the milk, egg, flour and baking powder together with a whisk until no lumps remain.
2. Stir in the remaining ingredients.
3. Cook the batter by tablespoonfuls on a medium griddle, until browned on both sides.
4. Allow the cakes to cool, and serve with a dollop of sour cream and more glasswort.


Amazingly enough I added the link I got this from in my notes.

the3foragers.blogspot.com...

www.eattheweeds.com...
Cattails: Swamp Supermarket
Scalloped Cattails

Scrape off two cups of brown cattail tops and put them into a bowl with two beaten eggs, one-half cup melted butter, one-half teaspoon each sugar and nutmeg and black pepper. Blend well and add slowly one cup of scalded milk to the cattail mixture and blended. Pour the mixture into a greased casserole and top with grated Swiss cheese —optional — and add a dab of butter. Bake 275 degrees for 30 minutes.


OKAY AHAB.. you were right. JAYSUS...



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 04:45 PM
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Originally posted by Advantage

Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by Advantage
 


Excellent thread. I think you really should cross-post this thread in the Survival Forum. Both threads would garner a lot more input, much needed info, from both places.....


Des


Over the yrs Ive tried putting things in the survival sections. Unfortunately seems real survival foods are found here more readily since that section is cluttered up by.. hooey.


Id read a post of yours earlier today in the survival section.. wanted to share this with you specifically


www.hort.purdue.edu...

In past discussions and even in chat when the show is on.. folks think they cant find "food".. eve discuss cannibalism.. for real seriously! Nahh, food is EVERYWHERE.
edit on 8-10-2012 by Advantage because: (no reason given)


I started living the prepper lifestyle 15 years ago when I sold my home in Palo Alto California and moved to a rural mountain area to buy a new home and land. I now raise my own food, a lot of it, and raise goats I use for my business.

I think it's important to have threads like these, for those who are just now starting to feel like they'd like to be more in control of their lives.

Thanks for the link, I'll check it out later tonight.

Des



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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Originally posted by Destinyone

Originally posted by Advantage

Originally posted by Destinyone
reply to post by Advantage
 


Excellent thread. I think you really should cross-post this thread in the Survival Forum. Both threads would garner a lot more input, much needed info, from both places.....


Des


Over the yrs Ive tried putting things in the survival sections. Unfortunately seems real survival foods are found here more readily since that section is cluttered up by.. hooey.


Id read a post of yours earlier today in the survival section.. wanted to share this with you specifically


www.hort.purdue.edu...

In past discussions and even in chat when the show is on.. folks think they cant find "food".. eve discuss cannibalism.. for real seriously! Nahh, food is EVERYWHERE.
edit on 8-10-2012 by Advantage because: (no reason given)


I started living the prepper lifestyle 15 years ago when I sold my home in Palo Alto California and moved to a rural mountain area to buy a new home and land. I now raise my own food, a lot of it, and raise goats I use for my business.

I think it's important to have threads like these, for those who are just now starting to feel like they'd like to be more in control of their lives.

Thanks for the link, I'll check it out later tonight.

Des

Yeah, youre right. Ill post in the survival section again. Damn reality checks... LOL!

I was raised by a "prepper". "Nuke Bombs are comin' hide your head and stick your butt in the air" era survivor.
Also he was rez raised, so that trends to make folks learn to make do with things others may not. Ive been living the prepper style since I can recall.. and didnt even know it! I get older and we get involved in survival camp, etc.. had to thank dad for the leg up.
I do forget that others arent so exposed to this by family or culture... and I cant really expect folks to know the real basic stuff.. theyll need it soon IMO. Thanks for the reality check.. I need em often.

Tell you what.. Ill make over the next few days a THRIVAL thread.. not just scraping by survival.. and Im going to BEG you to participate. I mean Ill annoy the hell out of you until you do.
I want to learn more as much as I feel the need to share what I know or have.

PS.. I envy you having a minifarm. We did, then had to move with a transfer... and needing to be close to the hospital that secured my daughters transplant.... ARGH. I am trying to tell the husband I will sacrifice most everything if he can secure a transfer to Great Falls MT.. at the Malmstrom base... and buy me a cabin in the woods..... in Wolf Creek or something. 99% of the family is over in Browning.. Wolf Creek should provide me the cushion of being annoyed to death by them.
I found a 2 bedroom cabin on 30 acres w 11 cleared with outbuildings for under 100K. Now if I can just sell this house I bought.... anyone want to buy a 5 br historic home and Ill leave most of the furniture and electronics with it in the sale??



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 11:19 AM
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Thank you for posting this OP!

I for one love these recipes. Even though I don't approach the from a prepper perspective, and more from a historical one, I love this! I collect old recipes and will post some here when I'm actually at home.



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


I'd love your Frybread recipe please.
I said please!



posted on Oct, 13 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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reply to post by Advantage
 


Sorry stutter post..



edit on 13-10-2012 by spacedoubt because: (no reason given)





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