My own comic, but need help...

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posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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OK first, I've 'googled it' and I've asked on other sites but people gave sarcastic answers, so people... reply if you actually know any helpful info:
anyways... I've been making my own comic universe, multiple characters, stories that cross Into each other, umm what I need help with though is... knowing where I could go, what store or site or whatever to go to ask about my comic, ask for their opinion, thoughts, if they could help publish, ect.


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OK might have found a good site, thanks to the first replier
edit on 7-10-2012 by saiyankev because: might have found answer




posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Have you looked at Image Comics? They run the company as creator owned.



"Creator-owned" means exactly that—the trademark and copyright of the work in question is wholly owned by its original creator. The majority of the comics and graphic novels published by Image are creator-owned. While Image as a company does have some say in the promotion and distribution of the titles it publishes, it is done with non-creative interference to protect the company and maintain responsibility for our public image.


It was started by talents like Todd Mcfarlane and Jim Lee. Contact someone there.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:22 PM
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Originally posted by TheLieWeLive
Have you looked at Image Comics? They run the company as creator owned.



"Creator-owned" means exactly that—the trademark and copyright of the work in question is wholly owned by its original creator. The majority of the comics and graphic novels published by Image are creator-owned. While Image as a company does have some say in the promotion and distribution of the titles it publishes, it is done with non-creative interference to protect the company and maintain responsibility for our public image.


It was started by talents like Todd Mcfarlane and Jim Lee. Contact someone there.
well that's 1 way... now I gotta think what to say and... to who, thanks
any more ideas where tho? I guess just other small comic companies like them?... knowing who to trust with my ideas is a huge problem cause you never know who'll steal, u know?



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by saiyankev
 

Excuse the clumsy HTML. I did a Google search on "how to get a comic book published." Got quite a lot of hits. Anyway:


How to Get a Comic Book Published [WikiHow]



1.   Get a following for your comic before you think about having it published.
That way, you have a reliable fan group
that will buy your book when it’s published -- something publishers like to
see. Post your comics online and use social networking sites to direct readers
to your work. Check with local weekly papers to see whether they use local
comics.
2.   Enter contests
for broader exposure. Individual publishers often sponsor contests and
talent searches, as do organizations. Many of these contests offer publication
in an anthology as a prize, which can help establish your credibility as a
comic book artist.
3.   Locate comic
book publishers that publish books in your genre. You can do this through
online research, browsing at a comic store or attending a convention. Many
publishers hire writers and artists to work on existing projects, rather than
publishing those writers’ and artists’ books. If the publisher offers a limited
number of characters and styles in its offerings, you’ll have a more difficult
time getting your book published with them. Instead, seek out a publisher with
diverse offerings and comic approaches.
4.   Review each publisher’s submission
guidelines carefully, especially noting whether the publisher requires a
query letter or whether they accept unsolicited manuscripts. Publishers receive
so many manuscripts that if you fail to follow their guidelines, you may not be
able to get a comic book published, because they may not even review your work.
5.   Choose the
sample of your work to submit to the publisher, based on the submission
guidelines. Most publishers require a submission of sequential pages long
enough to reveal your storytelling skills, so choose a sample with a clear plot
or one that reveals your characters. Make sure, too, that it demonstrates your
artistic skill. Photocopy the sample once you decide on it.
6.   Write a query
letter if the publisher doesn’t accept unsolicited manuscripts. If the
publisher does accept unsolicited manuscripts, you’ll want to write a cover
letter.


A query letter should
introduce your work; highlight your accomplishments, such as any contests
you’ve won and how many readers you have; summarize the comic book you
hope to submit to them for review; and discuss why you believe your work
is a good match for the publisher.
A cover letter should
also introduce your work, highlight your accomplishments and discuss why
your work is a good match for the publisher. Instead of fully summarizing
your work, briefly set the context for the sample and discuss where in
the book it appears.


7.   Send the query
letter out to those publishers who don’t accept unsolicited manuscripts.
Send the cover letter and your sample to those publishers that do. Be sure to
include your email, phone number and physical address.
8.   Wait to hear
from the publisher. This usually takes a minimum of 4 weeks, but check the
submission guidelines to find out how long the review process takes the
publisher.


If the publisher likes
the idea you present in your query letter, they will ask you to submit a
sample.
If the publisher likes
the idea you present in your cover letter, they may ask you to submit
your entire manuscript.
Check the submission
guidelines to find out whether the publisher will contact you if they
reject your idea.






edit on 10/7/2012 by Ex_CT2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by Ex_CT2
 
again... knowing who to trust is a big problem,but I think that other poster helped... ImageComics looks good to post



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 07:21 PM
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Pick up a copy of The 2013 Artists and Graphic Designer's Market.
It has a list of all comic syndicates, contacts there...and submission requirements.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 07:40 PM
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I dont know if this would be down your ally but you can submit comics to dorkly:

www.dorkly.com...

Its comedy comic stuff I dont know if thats what your doing...



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 07:43 PM
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I also found these via google:

www.creators.com...

comicbooks.about.com...



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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Originally posted by roughycannon
I dont know if this would be down your ally but you can submit comics to dorkly:

www.dorkly.com...

Its comedy comic stuff I dont know if thats what your doing...

oh, ya sorry thanks... but I'm actually doing like marvel/DC type stuff... action, some history,fighting crime, powers, aliens, time travel, ect



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by IAMTAT
Pick up a copy of The 2013 Artists and Graphic Designer's Market.
It has a list of all comic syndicates, contacts there...and submission requirements.
alright,thanks....imlooking right now





 
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