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New Asteroid 2012 TV

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posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:18 PM
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Did searh nothing

neo.jpl.nasa.gov...

OK just a head up notice nothing to big or close
Just pop up on my widget at a distance off .663 LD (lunar distance)
100 ft not bad



# obs. used (total) 175

data-arc span 1 day

first obs. used 2012-10-05

last obs. used 2012-10-06

planetary ephem. DE405

SB-pert. ephem. SB405-CPV-2

condition code 6

fit RMS 3427

data source ORB

producer Otto Matic

solution date 2012-Oct-07 01:02:32

Here more info
remanzacco.blogspot.ca...

twitter.com...
edit on 7-10-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


Another near miss. Makes one wonder, it's only really a matter of time before one of a notable size comes in contact with the surface.

That's nature for ya.
edit on 7-10-2012 by Soloro because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


Are we dead yet ?

Hopefully it will be like a bullet in the head. You never hear the shot ? Just fool'in about.

So close no close what ?

Ah that's better !
edit on 7-10-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:31 PM
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Originally posted by Soloro
reply to post by Trillium
 


Another near miss. Makes one wonder, it's only really a matter of time before one of a notable size comes in contact with the surface.

That's nature for ya.
edit on 7-10-2012 by Soloro because: (no reason given)


Yes how long will our luck will last.
Bad part it only been seen 2 day's ago



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by randyvs
reply to post by Trillium
 


Are we dead yet ?

Hopefully it will be like a bullet in the head. You never hear the shot ? Just fool'in about.

So close no close what ?

Ah that's better !
edit on 7-10-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)


Ok this could only me but the last few close one that pass the last few month or more
only show up on my widget and seen only 2 to 3 day before and will miss earth.
Will they let us in on it when it come to a direct hit. My guess is no the pass notice history
point that way. what do you's think.
edit on 7-10-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


I think your feet are planted on the ground. And you walk with eyes open.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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(2012 TC4). This is an other NEO passing close to the earth on Oct 12. The distance from earth will be 0.0006AU (0.2LD). Diameter 16_30m. Hope the trajectory has been calculated correctly . Hope also the wind is not strong
edit on 7-10-2012 by Red73Eng because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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Ok just to put my point across here a other one 2 to 3 day
ssd.jpl.nasa.gov... TC4;orb=1
Will be at .247 LD (lunar distance )
edit on 7-10-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by Trillium
Yes how long will our luck will last.
Bad part it only been seen 2 day's ago


Somewhere between a day and a billion years.... give or take a day or two...



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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Here my JPL Widget




posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 05:44 PM
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Until one is about to hit earth and we are in danger..... I want to hear nothing of it



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by dayve
Until one is about to hit earth and we are in danger..... I want to hear nothing of it


That the problem they will not tell nobody if they sure it going to hit
That why they take 2 to 3 day to make sure it a safe one before they post it.

Also why did they not see the one over the UK

Just maybe they did see it
edit on 7-10-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:36 PM
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Originally posted by Trillium

Originally posted by randyvs
reply to post by Trillium
 


Are we dead yet ?

Hopefully it will be like a bullet in the head. You never hear the shot ? Just fool'in about.

So close no close what ?

Ah that's better !
edit on 7-10-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)


Ok this could only me but the last few close one that pass the last few month or more
only show up on my widget and seen only 2 to 3 day before and will miss earth.
Will they let us in on it when it come to a direct hit. My guess is no the pass notice history
point that way. what do you's think.
edit on 7-10-2012 by Trillium because: (no reason given)


There have been some only noticed in a shorter time frame previously, and much closer. It only appeared 07/10/125 on spaceweather.com, so I suggest that the JPL/NASA source is the best for immediacy. There, in this case, it clearly says first observation 05/10/12. Beyond that, maybe you could befriend a amateur observer who is keyed into updating through JPL.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


A lot of NEOs aren't seen until they're actually near Earth. Most asteroids have a very low albedo (amount of sunlight they reflect) so they aren't seen until they're close.

reply to post by Trillium
 


People claim that no one would be warned by the sighting of a possible asteroid impact event, but history speaks otherwise. Just look at what happened with Apophis, 2005 YU55, 2011 UL21, and a handful of others. People were notified and actions were taken to figure out what could happen.

reply to post by Red73Eng
 


Even if it were to enter the atmosphere it would not make it to the ground in one piece. It would break up in the outer reaches of the atmosphere, though some smaller chunks could make it to the ground. It would be larger, but similar to, 2008 TC3.

reply to post by Trillium
 


That is a pretty awesome widget! Do you know if it is available on Android devices in some form by chance? I don't run widgets on the desktop and it would be neat to have handy!

reply to post by Trillium
 


Despite what you think, it probably wasn't seen. While not entirely accurate, the quote from Armageddon of, "Well, our object collision budget allows us to track about 3% of the sky, and begging your pardon, but that's a big-ass sky," comes to mind.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by cmdrkeenkid
 


The only thing I found so far is this
www.jpl.nasa.gov...
and
www.jpl.nasa.gov...
and
twitter.com...



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


Thanks! All look to be pretty neat and helpful, but nothing with the comparisons such as that widget. Maybe I'll have to bite the bullet and ad one to the screen. Thanks for the links and getting me in the right direction! It's appreciated!



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 08:04 AM
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This asteroid was discovered by the ISON-NM network, so Leonid Elenin's site was probably the first to mention it (while it was still being confirmed by the Minor Planet Center).
spaceobs.org...
I'm the one credited with translation.


There are also some Facebook groups where this sort of stuff gets posted as soon as. For example
www.facebook.com...
www.facebook.com...
And the man himself: www.facebook.com...



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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BTW,
There's another, even closer flyby on the way,

2012 TC4 Oct 12 0.2 LD -- 22 m It will still be a miss by a long margin.



posted on Oct, 11 2012 @ 01:53 AM
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Sorry, got the asteroids mixed up, this is 2012 tc4

Coming live to you today!



reply to post by smurfy
 


Update.......Slooh will be recording live at 5:30 est....Oct 11....new numbers are.......


59,000 miles from Earth......they are getting closer.


And we are getting less warning.....enjoy the show!




Discovered by Pan-STARRS observatory in Hawaii on October 4th, 2012, Asteroid 2012 TC4 will make its close approach to Earth this week. Slooh Space Camera will cover its near-approach on Thursday, October 11th, live on Slooh.com, free to the public, starting at 2:30 PM PDT / 5:30 PM EDT / 21:30 UTC - accompanied by real-time discussions with Slooh President, Patrick Paolucci, Slooh Outreach Coordinator, Paul Cox, and Astronomy Magazine columnist, Bob Berman. Viewers can watch live on their PC or IOS/Android mobile device. Viewers will be in for a special surprise as Asteroid TC4 will be in the same field of view as the planet Neptune during Slooh’s live coverage.

Asteroid 2012 TC4 is estimated to be about 100 feet long (30 meters), which is as tall as a ten story building. At close approach, the asteroid will only be about 0.25 Lunar Distances from Earth (about 88,000 kilometers / 59,000 miles).


events.slooh.com...

edit on 11-10-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)
edit on 11-10-2012 by timetothink because: (no reason given)






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