More evidence that Voyager has exited the solar system

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posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 04:38 AM
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"Pathetic earthlings. Hurling your bodies out into the void, without the slightest inkling of who or what is out here. If you had known anything about the true nature of the universe, anything at all, you would've hidden from it in terror."

FLASH!! Ahhh-ahhhh




posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 05:42 AM
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Maybe it will never come back. It will,be grabbed and crushed as we are not suppose to see outside our solar system.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 10:02 AM
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Wow, just wait until the day that the Voyager hits the wall, then we will have to find out how to get through it to see what's behind that.....................Awesome.............



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 10:36 AM
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one question... how did Voyager navigate the Oort cloud?

if it went straight though the trillions of icey comets and proto planets of ice that are supposed to be there in the Oort Clloud... it's trajectory must have been very fortuitous/lucky....


like a cue ball missing every other ball scattered on a pool table


solarsystem.nasa.gov...


Sometime before the year 2020, Voyager 1 will become the first spacecraft to cross the heliopause-the outer boundary of the vast region of space dominated by the solar wind and the Sun's magnetic field-and reach interstellar space. In that sense, it can be said that the spacecraft will be able to sample what space is like beyond our solar system. (If we define the solar system as the Sun and everything that primarily orbits the Sun, however, Voyager 1 will remain within the confines of the solar system until it emerges from the Oort cloud in another 14,000 to 28,000 years).



Oh... interstellar space is still a far distance away !
i think the msm & nasa got carried away with the anniversary of V---G--R



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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Originally posted by sonnny1

Originally posted by michael1983l
reply to post by woogleuk
 


If I was given the opportunity I would happily board a space craft to explore the outer solar system/other solar systems even with the knowledge of never returning.



I don't think I could do that, without a mate..........



im assuming you've never been married



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 11:52 AM
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Does anyone have an idea to how we can receive data from such a long distance?? I am assuming the connection would have to be wireless. I was under the impression that with current technology it is unable to send/recieve data even from 2 far away points on our own planet. How could the voyager do this?



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 12:00 PM
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Originally posted by michael1983l
reply to post by woogleuk
 


If I was given the opportunity I would happily board a space craft to explore the outer solar system/other solar systems even with the knowledge of never returning.


Me too. I would be out of here in a heart beat if given the chance.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by homeskillet
 


Twice.



I didnt say Married. I should have said "Mates".




posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 06:11 AM
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We'll know it's in interstellar space when something reverses, I think the solar wind. It may be a few years yet.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 08:03 AM
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reply to post by vendettent
 




Does anyone have an idea to how we can receive data from such a long distance??

Voyager is currently pushing the envelope of current dish size.
We cannot even communicate to the nearest star let alone the Ort cloud.

Besides radio response time drags into years. not hours.



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by mac420
 


Without digging it up again, I read sometime back when Vger was approaching the cusp of our solar systems edge that they were expecting a violent sudden transition. However the transition entering the Heliosphere began to build up slowly. This 'calmer' area outside our solar system is where the force of our solar winds meet the incoming galactic winds, causing a 'neutral zone' in the middle that might take Vger 10 years to pass. (If memory serves).

The area within the bubble of our solar system is considered 'clean space' because the solar winds cast everything out, and there were concerns that intersteller space travel might be impossible due to the lack of heat protection and debris fields and blah di blah. The bubble around our solar system is not perfectly round because the pressure coming from the Galactic wind is squeezing on it making it an oval shape. The bubble cannot be 'popped' because the heliosphere's opposing winds, and the size of Vger is a so tiny compare to the scale of the solar system.

I hope I somewhat discribed that correctly.

edit on 8-10-2012 by Lonewulph because: just noticed reading back somebody else just hit on this, sorry!



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by sonnny1

Originally posted by michael1983l
reply to post by woogleuk
 


If I was given the opportunity I would happily board a space craft to explore the outer solar system/other solar systems even with the knowledge of never returning.



I don't think I could do that, without a mate..........

or atleast internet porn and world of warcraft am i rite
?



posted on Oct, 8 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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The distance from the Earth to the Sun is known as an astronomical unit. That distance is about 93 million miles. Voyager one is about 122 astronomical units (or Au's) from Earth. While it takes sunlight to reach Earth from the sun it takes about 17 hours to reach Voyager 1, and it is traveling about 38,120 mph.

By comparison the Earth circumference is about 25,000 miles, it would be like traveling from the north pole to the south and then back again, in under one hour.

Both spacecraft will have no problem traversing either the Oort cloud, or for that matter be affected by any energetic field beyond that. The truth is that the Oort could is about 50,000 AU from our sun, which is nearly a light year from our sun.

It will take about another 17,565 years before Voyager 1 actually reaches that distance, in general, at its current speed (minus of course the number of years it has already traveled).

en.wikipedia.org...

Any thoughts?
edit on 8-10-2012 by Kashai because: modifed content



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 06:40 AM
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reply to post by Lonewulph
 




The area within the bubble of our solar system is considered 'clean space' because the solar winds cast everything out, and there were concerns that intersteller space travel might be impossible due to the lack of heat protection and debris fields and blah di blah.

Totally incorrect.
There is no source of heat to need protection from.
And there are no debris fields.
Too much Star Trek.



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by samkent
reply to post by Lonewulph
 




The area within the bubble of our solar system is considered 'clean space' because the solar winds cast everything out, and there were concerns that intersteller space travel might be impossible due to the lack of heat protection and debris fields and blah di blah.

Totally incorrect.
There is no source of heat to need protection from.
And there are no debris fields.
Too much Star Trek.



I see I wasn't clear on the past tense I meant to imply to that statement, (I did mention I was pulling from memory,) from what we know now.

"there WERE concerns that intersteller space travel MIGHT be impossible"

Had I been more awake it would have sounded more like:

For decades it was assumed that the Sun had a bow shock. In 2012, data from IBEX and Voyagers showed that the Sun's bow shock does not exist. Instead, these authors argue that a subsonic bow wave defines the transition from the solar wind flow to the interstellar medium.[83][84] A bow shock is the third boundary of an astrosphere after the termination shock and the astropause (called the heliopause in the Solar System).[84]

Star Trek, really


edit on 9-10-2012 by Lonewulph because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 9 2012 @ 10:29 PM
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Bow shock

A bow shock is the area between a magnetosphere and an ambient medium. For stars, this is typically the boundary between their stellar wind and the interstellar medium.

In a planetary magnetosphere, the bow shock is the boundary at which the speed of the solar wind abruptly drops as a result of its approach to the magnetopause. The best-studied example of a bow shock is that occurring where the solar wind encounters the Earth's magnetopause, although bow shocks occur around all magnetized planets. The Earth's bow shock is about 17.3 km thick and located about 90,000 km (56,000 mi) from the Earth.

For several decades, the solar wind from the Sun was thought to form a bow shock when it collides with the surrounding interstellar medium. This long-held belief was called into question in 2012 when data from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) found the solar system to be moving slower through the interstellar medium than previous believed.[1] This new finding suggests that beyond the termination shock and heliopause surrounding the solar system there is in fact no bow shock. [1]

Bow shock theory for Earth's Sun

It was hypothesised that the Sun also has a bow shock as it travels through the interstellar medium. This will occur if the interstellar medium is moving supersonically towards the Sun, since the sun's solar wind is moving supersonically away from the Sun. The point where the interstellar medium becomes subsonic is the bow shock; the point where the interstellar medium and solar wind pressures balance is at the heliopause; the point where the solar wind becomes subsonic is the termination shock. According to Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell of NASA, the solar bow shock may lie at around 230 AU[2] from the Sun. However, data in 2012 from NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) and corroborated with results from the Voyagers, has found that due to refinements in the relative speed of the heliosphere and the local interstellar magnetic field strength it is believed the heliosphere is prevented from forming a bow shock in the region of our galaxy our sun is currently passing through.


en.wikipedia.org...


edit on 9-10-2012 by Kashai because: modified content



posted on Dec, 4 2012 @ 02:45 PM
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In response to your question is it really at the edge of the solar system. Not its just at the edge of the magnetic bubble that shields the solar system from certain types of particles. The Oort cloud extends well beyond the magnetic bubble. In fact, it will take Voyager another 14,000 to move outside the Oort cloud. www.impartial-review.com...



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by phantomjack
 


Well, just today, scientists at NASA have stated that they are now sure that Voyager one has left the solar system, and entered the interstellar space beyond. They are saying that the "plasma density" changes recorded by the craft, confirm it, with clear differences between what has been recorded by the craft whilst it was inside, and on the edges of what they refer to as the solar system, and what it is recording now.

Pretty wild eh? Yes, ok, theres still the Oort cloud to deal with, never mind the huge amount of time it will take to pass that area (thats assuming that any attempt to pass through it does not result in the collision of the spacecraft with one of the uncountable number of rocks and dust floating around in that region of space). But none the less, this is yet another milestone on our road to space!

Let us not tarry in taking the next!



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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reply to post by TrueBrit
 


I was literally just reading that on BBC News, it's about bloody time, lol.

100,000 MPH and still 40,000 years from the nearest star.


Voyager probe 'leaves Solar System'



posted on Sep, 12 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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Like I have mentioned before I kept hoping something crazy would happen to it. Like it started speeding up until it was near light speed or it was poof gone and we found out we live in a bubble of space. No such luck....yet!





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