Tremors felt 45 miles away from Bayou Corne Sinkhole!

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posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 11:15 AM
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reply to post by Olivine
 

Olivine, i can agree to disagree but i would suggest you refrain from dismissing that of which you clearly know very little.


Magma, by definition, would mean the area is volcanically active, versus dormant.
this statement is patently false and most know so.
Mt St Helens is a prime example.

as for the volcanism attributes associated with Louisiana, you might want to review the sulfur deposits mined from the salt dome that is collapsing


here's a start for you ... www.georgiagulfsulfur.com...

In the late 1800s the Frasch process - a mining technique that recovers from 75% to 92% of a salt dome’s recoverable sulphur - became operational (Bodenlos 1973: 615). This made the large underground sulphur deposits of the Texas and Louisiana salt domes exploitable, and provided the world with a new source of high-purity (99.5%) elemental sulphur. These stockpiles today (1992) account for more than 50% of the U.S. sulphur supply (see update notes). By 1913 the United States had become the world leader in sulphur production; it has never relinquished the lead (Whitehead 1931; Shelton 1979). Canada, Japan, France, Poland, and Mexico are also major sulphur suppliers. Volcanic deposits are currently exploited in Indonesia and in Chile and other parts of South America.

this response is not simply to argue but to encourage everyone to step outside the box and think a bit broader.

from the link above

In an industry meeting in Calgary in late October 1999, Mr. Gerard d' Aquin, President of Con-Sul Inc., stated that 80% to 85% of United States sulfur production in the year 2000 would be recovered sulphur produced from hydrogen sulfide (H2S).

now perhaps i'm mistaken but wasn't the H2S releases some of the most concerning due to its volatility and toxicity ????

this is not hype, this is an attempt to understand ... which seems to be something not many are interested in at all.




posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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Being one to never be afraid to peer outside of the box and taking a cue from Honor's posts, I have found the following:


Abundant evidence from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Basin suggests that late Early Cretaceous to Recent sea-floor spreading is the principal factor in the formation of the structural components of this basin. This would classify the Gulf of Mexico Basin as an active tectonic basin as opposed to the more accepted passive basin status.


PROBABLE CRETACEOUS-TO-RECENT RIFTING IN THE GULF OF MEXICO BASIN An answer to Callovian salt deformation and distribution problems?

Its hard to separate the wheat from the chaff when doing a google search for "volcanic activity""southern louisiana" because mostly what you get is extreme fringe sites. I found this (and others, still perusing) by searching google scholar because I want more scientific results, and yes I know how myopic those lab coat wearing folks can be...

Now, all of this in mind I am reminded of a thread in which Honor provided many valuable references to me and other posters.

One of the things that came up was the idea of an expanding earth. The above-referenced work would seem to support that contention, at least to my mind. If this is the case, the the sinkhole may be exacerbated by processes which are beyond mainstream comprehension.

Here is a short video about the idea of an expanding earth:



Fairly compelling, I would say.

A longer video with more detail is this one:



Again, quite compelling and logical.

If these processes are what is involved, then we may be seeing something extraordinary indeed.

To be perfectly clear, I understand that the original cause of the sinkhole and subsequent disturbed rock zone are due to the sidewall blowout of Oxy 3. I think that it may have provided us a window in to what is going on deeper underground.
edit on 24-7-2013 by jadedANDcynical because: fix video code



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 03:04 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 


They would need to know for sure that the land under the plant is compromised. Even when they do find out, they wont have much time to move anything. A plant that took 2 years to build wont be able to pack up and leave in less than 6 months.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by CajunBoy
 


I'm well aware of the sort of infrastructure in place around petrochem plants, lived in Texas City and am very familiar with them.

Perhaps if they are installing seismic sensors or tilt meters at such locations, that would be an indication that they are worried about the problems being much larger than is being let on about. These types of measures would not be known to anyone except upper management.

Don't want to go too far into loonland, but it is serious and if these very disturbing possibilities are present, I doubt much would be said about any sort of preparations.

 


Also to state, if the dome is being further eroded by the sinkhole/aquifer combination, it would not be something that played out over anything less than years, at least to my mind.

I don't see a sudden collapse as possible but rather a slow degradation of the most vulnerable portions.These salt domes have taken tens of thousands of years to bubble up through the sediments and are HUGE, it would take many years to wash one away unless there were some other process aiding the dissolution.
edit on 24-7-2013 by jadedANDcynical because: more to say



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 03:33 PM
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what alarms me the most is the rapid rate the sink hole is growing and becoming deeper.
this signifies a rapid increase of erosion happening underneath.
if the size and depth continues at this rate..or speeds up...look out!!



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by Honor93
reply to post by Olivine
 

Olivine, i can agree to disagree but i would suggest you refrain from dismissing that of which you clearly know very little.

Magma, by definition, would mean the area is volcanically active, versus dormant.
this statement is patently false and most know so.
Mt St Helens is a prime example.

First, I used the term "dormant", versus, "extinct" because I do have a decent grasp of the scale of geologic time, and realize that it could be short-sighted to classify a volcano or an entire volcanic province "extinct".
"Dormant" means different things to different people, and the use of the term has changed over time, especially with new insights into volcanic processes. For me, no activity of any kind, for tens of thousands of years would be considered dormant. Oregon State Univ. defines the term as no activity since the last ice age.

My statement is not false.

How is Mount St. Helens a prime example?

Just because the general public, at the time, may have thought MSH was "dormant", the scientists in the young field of modern volcano monitoring did not.
From a 1978 Geological Survey Bulletin, Potential Hazards From Future Eruptions of Mount St. Helens Volcano
From page 22:

Future eruptions from Mount St. Helens are a near certainty.


I am not a geologist or vulcanologist, but my reading comprehension is fine. I'm learning more every day on the subjects, and am comfortable with my understanding of basic geologic processses.

Thanks. Enjoy your discussion; I'm done.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 04:52 PM
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Here I go again, baby! Pease watch this video, pertains to the new rig fire and lighting the fuse for a chain reaction the world will never forget. Numerous gigantic salt domes used to store gas and oil are about to blow, please get out of the Gulf area as soon as possible!




Fukiwhatever in Japan is in total meltdown, and HAARP has been trying to reverse the jet stream to blow the fallout over Russia, in the meantime China made a military move against Japan. Mideast Showdown with Iraqi death row inmates on the loose, Pakistan with tennis ball sized nukes, and Israel fueling the fire. Peace and Godspeed, Xenongod



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 

JC, thanks for the consideration

actually, i hadn't thought about the expanding theory until you mentioned it.

i was leaning more toward Macondo and its ongoing issues coupled with the corexit dispersement and all of that finding its way into the LA sediments for miles inland.

we can't even guess what chemical reactions could be taking place because we are not permitted to know of the compounds injected/dispersed


when i consider the Arkansas quake series with the UNexplained explosions, reports of spontaneous combustions, gas clouds 120 miles away, platform failures, pipeline bursts and the burning poles in TX ... LA's issue doesn't seem so centralized to me anymore.

here are a few 'scholarly' writings you may find of interest.
link 1

In addition, the segmentation of the transitional crust beneath the northern GoM into a magmatically robust segment beneath the Texas coast and a stretched margin beneath Louisiana is also consistent with BAB behavior:
- snip -
The Gulf of Mexico (GoM) is a rare example where the origin of a sizable oceanic basin at low latitudes is still unclear. The GoM is a nearly enclosed basin, encompassing ~1.6 × 106 km2, bounded on the
north by North America, on the west by Mexico, and on the south by the Yucatan Peninsula and Cuba.
We have only indirect information about its early evolution, due to thick sediments, including salt, and the lack of correlatable, spreading-related magnetic anomalies.

link 2
link 3
link 4
link 5


*******************************

@ Olivine
volcanic monitoring has been around for a few hundred years now ... which part are you claiming is "young" ?

tectonics -- now that's the 'young' science.
it's not even 100yrs old yet.

as for MSH ... she was reported as dormant all the way up to her eruption, hence, magma presence has nothing to do with 'dormancy'.

as stated earlier, magma is generated constantly, in many parts of the world.
especially in a BAB (back-arc basin) as is the GOM.

couple that with the Mississippi escarpment and its components/contributions and we have a discussion.

scientific american

VOLCANO HISTORY: Mount St. Helens took scientists, not to mention the public, by surprise when it erupted catastrophically in May 1980. It was the deadliest volcanic event in U.S. history.

now, no offense intended but it was a surprise, to quite a few.
MSH.com

On the basis of its youth and its high frequency of eruptions over the past 4,000 years, Crandell, Mullineaux, and their colleague Meyer Rubin published in February 1975 that Mount St. Helens was the one volcano in the conterminous United States most likely to reawaken and to erupt "perhaps before the end of this century." This prophetic conclusion was followed in 1978 by a more detailed report, in which Crandell and Mullineaux elaborated their earlier conclusion and analyzed, with maps and scenarios, the kinds, magnitudes, and areal extents of potential volcanic hazards that might be expected from future eruptions of Mount St. Helens. Collectively, these two publications contain one of the most accurate forecasts of a violent geologic event.

if you really don't want to discuss it, fine, don't.
however, please be respectful of others rather post such a dismissive reply.
some of us are interested in WHAT is going on down there.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 05:14 PM
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reply to post by xenongod
 


I'm sorry, I can't take this video seriously.... Oil does not dissolve salt, and that is the bases of half the video. Many oil deposits are located near salt domes. Never do they dissolve. Adding flow to this equation doesn't do much either.

This guy has no credibility in geology, petroleum engineering, or explosive physics.

What gas are they pumping into the ground he talks of? What volcano are they speaking of? Is there some geological thing I missed in the gulf? This video gives no proof to anything said in the video.
edit on 24-7-2013 by CajunBoy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


The very fact that there are so many odd geological occurrences taking place (all of those that you mention, and many others such as the massive methane fountains, deep ocean heating , earthquakes in odd places), taken into consideration along with the rate of global expansion (as discussed in the second, longer video I posted) when plotted on a graph shows an exponential curve indicates that the rate of expansion is increasing as time goes on.

In other words, this expansion is happening faster now than it was in the past and will happen even faster still in the future.

Now, we are talking geologic time frames here, so 'fast' is a relative term. But in nature any cyclical process has periods of rapid advancement followed by periods of apparent dormancy. Growth spurts are a prime example of this.

This being the case, such growth spurts in an expanding earth would bring periods of equally expanded geologic activity of all types. Thing is, we don't have anywhere near enough data to be able to know if we are in a lull or growth spurt stage.

Hope this helps and is not too far off topic,I kind of had a stream of consciousness thing going and wanted to share...



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by jadedANDcynical
reply to post by Honor93
 


The very fact that there are so many odd geological occurrences taking place (all of those that you mention, and many others such as the massive methane fountains, deep ocean heating , earthquakes in odd places), taken into consideration along with the rate of global expansion (as discussed in the second, longer video I posted) when plotted on a graph shows an exponential curve indicates that the rate of expansion is increasing as time goes on.

In other words, this expansion is happening faster now than it was in the past and will happen even faster still in the future.

Now, we are talking geologic time frames here, so 'fast' is a relative term. But in nature any cyclical process has periods of rapid advancement followed by periods of apparent dormancy. Growth spurts are a prime example of this.

This being the case, such growth spurts in an expanding earth would bring periods of equally expanded geologic activity of all types. Thing is, we don't have anywhere near enough data to be able to know if we are in a lull or growth spurt stage.

Hope this helps and is not too far off topic,I kind of had a stream of consciousness thing going and wanted to share...


Your thought on Expanding Earth Theory just blew my mind.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 06:30 PM
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reply to post by CajunBoy
 


Well before you put all the pieces back together, have a look at my thread titled A Discussion on the Methodology of Earthquake Prediction that way you won't have to reassemble the puzzle.more than once!


Also,it would be good to watch the longer video, it is a little under an hour and a half but extremely interesting, especially since I know the field you are studying.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 06:42 PM
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reply to post by jadedANDcynical
 

sorry, still can't view the vids on this machine.
however, i do recall prior conversations and i think we tossed that around discussing all the activity across the world along the 37th parallel ?.

i still find it quite possible but it doesn't provide the answers, just a frame of consideration.

i am angry that we've been restricted from knowledge i happen to think is ESSENTIAL.
i am distressed that those who could help, really cannot.
i am hurt that soooo much loss is accepted as 'necessary'
i am fearful that those in the know, don't know as much as they think they do
but with all those nasty emotions, i am thankful that we have this platform to do and share what we can in the hopes of saving as much life as possible.

yes, all the worldly activity is interconnected and Mother Earth has put up with our stupidity many times over, however, she will make her adjustments long before we even realize just how bad we screwed up.

i can say this, all these geologic processes absolutely play into the growth or stabilization of the sinkhole. and, i find its potential to be a catalyst to so much more worth studying.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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I'll get caught up and respond in a bit, but i found this and wanted to
update everyone.

Methane Bubbling In New Orleans 70 Miles From Sinkhole!
www.pakalertpress.com...

Mark Brander

The situation in the Gulf is more critical than people realize. Expect this to escalate at any time.

The bubbling in Assumption Parish Bayous and New Orleans is the result of migrating gas from the methane hydrate deposit breached by the BP deep well. At pressures up to 900 PSI and temperatures of 400 F the crude has been forced into, and has been melting, an enormous deposit of methane hydrate beneath the seafloor, for over three years now.

More at link.

ignore the cooky stuff, but the fact that it is showing up that far away is alarming.
edit on 24-7-2013 by severdsoul because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


I forget you can't access youtube, I am not sure if any of the videos are available elsewhere in a different format...

Regardless, if my thinking is correct (a HUGE"if"), then whatever processes that are driving the expansion would increase during any growth spurt stage. This would result in increased energy in the entire system. We would see more seismic energy released (I recall a post by PuterMan somewhere where he charts #s of earthquakes, magnitudes and total energy released and, IIRC, the numbers showed a slight decrease while overall energy released was flat or slightly increased) , increased vulcanism, changes in atmospheric phenomena, more extreme weather; the oceans are an enormous weather driver and more heat there would result in more energetic weather patterns.

I can also imagine how this (the earth expanding) could produce the weird humming/roaring noises that have been reported the world.over.

All of it ties together.

I think of the sinkhole like a window into the workings of a machine, we get to see bits and pieces of what's happening within that would otherwise be hidden.



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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aside from the lean toward "doomsday talk", this is a pretty good read.
global research
the links at the bottom are worth reviewing also.

ps ... from the 'BP engineer' link, this communique sums it up nicely ...

www.guardian.co.uk...
In an e-mail on April 16, a BP official involved in the decision explained: "It will take 10 hours to install them. I do not like this." Later that day, another official recognized the risks of proceeding with insufficient centralizers but commented: "who cares, it's done, end of story, will probably be fine."


edit on 24-7-2013 by Honor93 because: add txt



posted on Jul, 24 2013 @ 11:23 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


It is a good read, if you look past the fact that the experts say "the world-changing event does occur it will happen suddenly and within the next 6 months." and the article is dated July 15, 2010.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 09:05 AM
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reply to post by CajunBoy
 

yes Cajunboy, i think i mentioned that aside from the doomsday talk it is a good read.

it does mention that BP officials have confirmed continued leakage.
it does remind us that to this day, media is prohibited from sharing any news/footage with us little people to the tune of a $40,000 fine.

it does bring to the forefront that the people who are paid exhorbitant salaries to do this work 'safely' aren't afraid to state openly ... "who cares, it's done" ... and it does remind me that no matter how many agencies are involved, protecting their own arses isn't even as important as hiding the truth.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


I can tell you this, the workers who do work for the company are the ones who WANT to keep the enviroment clean. It is the company men who monitor everything who push the workers to do unsafe things to get the job done ahead of schedule. They actually give bonuses to the formans and rig managers to get the job done ahead of schedule. When the screw ups do happen they try and hide EVERYTHING.



posted on Jul, 25 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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reply to post by CajunBoy
 

i wouldn't dispute that at all.
however, those same workers aren't the ones making devastating decisions with nonchalant commentary like "who cares"


here's the thing though.
the only way evil can prevail is for good men to do nothing.
(or in this case, to simply do what they are told)

i believe the concept of 'mutiny' exists for good reason.

yes, i understand everyone wants to keep their job but is it really worth it when you lose your health, your family, your home, your work station (platform sank) and any fortunes some cling to ??

some would probably answer yes and to me, that is just sad.

unless the 11 who perished are the only ones who knew of the failings, then i do hold the other workers accountable.
not only did they fail their co-workers, years later, they are still failing the rest of us.

the truth is out there and known by some but those who refuse to share what they know are the ones for whom i hold the deepest contempt.

ETA -- in case others didn't read the previous links ... let's at least get this on the table.
21 centralizers recommended ... 6 were placed ... someone on the line knew better, yet, chose to follow the leader and that is a truth they will have to live with or die trying to forget.
edit on 25-7-2013 by Honor93 because: ETA





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