Tremors felt 45 miles away from Bayou Corne Sinkhole!

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posted on Mar, 20 2013 @ 08:58 PM
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reply to post by tetra50
 


Hey man, better late then never. When I first learned of these salt caverns when I was younger, I was a ignorant on the topic, so I did my research. If you were to take the amount of chemicals stored in these caverns and stored them above ground, you would have to clear hundreds possibly thousands of acres to build the above ground facilities. If you ask me, I would prefer underground apposed to above. You have less environmental destruction.




posted on Mar, 20 2013 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by CajunBoy
 


I see your point, absolutely, but still......the salt domes are "natural," occurring below the swamp, right? so you can't consider it leak proof in the league of, say, concrete and reibar reinforced sealed underground containment chambers for nuclear waste. Not to mention, it's not like the domes were utilized for storage in this way just to store dangerous chemicals for want of somewhere else to put them. The salt was being mined, right? and just as with pumping oil out of a cavity underground (a well), theoretically, you must replace the volume and mass you have removed to retain some kind of stability overall, right? So it's a different situation than just looking for somewhere safe to store dangerous materials. In this way, you're absolutely right about the greed, because that's where the mutually beneficial monetary motivation comes into the whole eqauation.....

But still, I have to wonder that anyone would consider any structure in water that is made up of predominantly salt, with an extremely high solubility factor, all while you are continuing to remove that salt, as a situation that could ever be considered leak proof would be operating under any logic that I can fathom, at least, and I admit that might not be saying much......



posted on Mar, 20 2013 @ 10:02 PM
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Originally posted by CajunBoy
reply to post by tetra50
 


Hey man, better late then never. When I first learned of these salt caverns when I was younger, I was a ignorant on the topic, so I did my research. If you were to take the amount of chemicals stored in these caverns and stored them above ground, you would have to clear hundreds possibly thousands of acres to build the above ground facilities. If you ask me, I would prefer underground apposed to above. You have less environmental destruction.


Stored there? You imply that they are there till they need them. Abandoned there to destroy the future of the area is the words that should be used. Why create chemicals like this that need to be hidden away. We got this whole thing backwards, not many of these dangerous chemicals were created a hundred years ago. Can't we just fire all the chemists and physicists and go back to the old ways? Seems like the more electricity we create the more we cause bad things. Maybe electricity should have never developed. Neither should have guns and explosives.



posted on Mar, 20 2013 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


Hold on, didn't think that through. Retyping this.

Sir, if we did not have technology, you would not be sitting here having this conversation. If you think real deep into it, without technology, you sir may never have existed.
edit on 20-3-2013 by CajunBoy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 12:08 AM
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Originally posted by tetra50
reply to post by happykat39
 


Maybe I'm just a little too slow to get it, but it occurs to me that the solubility of salt, combined with a dome like structure of such submerged in water, and "leakproof," as all oxymorons.



Thank you, and very well put. I think I said something to that affect earlier in this thread. I like the way you think!!!



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 12:51 AM
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reply to post by thepolish1
 


thank you. very kind words, and I do remember you saying something to that effect, earlier, as well.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:12 AM
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Originally posted by CajunBoy
reply to post by rickymouse
 


Hold on, didn't think that through. Retyping this.

Sir, if we did not have technology, you would not be sitting here having this conversation. If you think real deep into it, without technology, you sir may never have existed.
edit on 20-3-2013 by CajunBoy because: (no reason given)


CB, I think you've been a great contributor here. I enjoy reading what you write, and your information has been invaluable to all of us watching and affected by this situation, and whether people realize this yet or not, ultimately, everyone is potentially affected.

But here, I gotta disagree, respectfully, and point out that the argument you just used on rickymouse, here, is so oft repeated on this website anytime someone says anything remotely negative about computers, technology and industrialization. It's almost as if this is what has become sacred in our culture, over everything else. This is the second time tonight I've typed it, but the "neon god" from "The Sound of Silence" has become overwhelmingly evident.

Don't get me wrong. Obviously, we all understand we cannot be exchanging this information, often life saving and affirming, without the computer, the electricity and the industrialization process that began long ago. I am sure you are familiar with the scene in Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey", where the apes uncover the monolith, and throw the bone in the air, the allusion to the evolving of species to the use of tools to the worshiping of technological singularity....the bone turned into a tool thrown in the air an obvious symbol and indication of sacrificing our physical bodies to the "machine," that threw everything into the time loop, over and over, where the machine each trip around becomes more our creator than we being its creator.

All things have the potential to be used in ways where the consequences or outcomes are beneficial, and the direct opposite, downright evil. We always have to keep this in mind. While it seems we would be nowhere at all without everything industrialization has provided thus far, in many ways, and as this thread and topic are a direct reality of what I'm talking about (and, I think, what Rickeymouse was saying, at risk of putting words in his mouth which I don't intend to do at all, as these thoughts are my own and I do not in any way seek to or have a right to represent his), it has now become essential to the survival of life and the planet and the future of the universe, to begin to address this very issue about technology.
I'll shut up now. Sorry to be so wordy, but I believe this to be all important, and what is happening with this sinkhole is a very important representation of the problem, in action.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:14 AM
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Here is a new posting from Celestial Convergence...

SOURCE #1 - Celestial Convergence

Much of the information in this posting is old but the new flyover is one of the best so far.


"Code 3" Maximum State Of Alert At The Giant Louisiana Sinkhole - Area Grows 3 Acres Last Week, Now Reaches 12 Acres, As Rainbow Oil Sheen Covers Much Of It?! NEW FLYOVER VIDEOS + PHOTOS








Source #2 - On Wings Of Care


Here are three videos taken today, as we circled the sinkhole a few times. More photos follow the videos. We'll let these all speak for themselves. High-resolution versions of any of the photos are available for purposes that benefit the public, just contact us at Info@OnWingsOfCare.org.

**** Many, many thanks to great photographer and friend Billy Dugger for joining us from Mississippi today for this flight! And to our stalwart friend, volunteer, pilot, and photographer Brayton Matthews from Flightline First at New Orleans' Lakefront Airport for taking all of the videos and more photos. And finally, thanks to Joyce Riley and her Power Hour radio listeners for donating our fuel costs for this flight.







There are 26 still photos at the source link...


edit on 21-3-2013 by happykat39 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 07:50 AM
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Originally posted by CajunBoy
reply to post by rickymouse
 


Hold on, didn't think that through. Retyping this.

Sir, if we did not have technology, you would not be sitting here having this conversation. If you think real deep into it, without technology, you sir may never have existed.
edit on 20-3-2013 by CajunBoy because: (no reason given)


Maybe you misunderstand. It is not technology that causes the problem, it is not thinking things through thoroughly and cutting corners that causes the problem.

The Physicists invented nuclear technology. But we took that technology and built nuclear bombs that can destroy the world. We took that technology and created power plants that produce nuclear waste that they bury in salt caverns and underground caverns where a big natural event can spread this concentrated toxic waste into the environment later on. In the end, the Physicists caused this problem, technology caused this problem. It is important to note that this extra electricity made it possible to build more plastics and other materials that are toxic to the environment, both from availability of power and from the power to run extra electric tools in the homes. Cause and effect is what has not been researched well.

Taking the nuclear waste and utilizing all of it as is proposed by new technology so it can be broke down to unharmful byproducts utilizing smaller power plants is better than concentrating this waste into areas and saying it is safe. I have no problem with this technology.

The plastic we create is also a big problem, it leaves a lot of toxic byproducts. These are buried in dumps or stored in caverns underground, this is not a responsible practice. What is the problem with recycling the paper waste and making wrapping paper and wax paper bags for our foods. Why do so many plastic containers have to be used. Why don't we recycle plastic more or do away with it. Nothing we make should pose a problem to the environment.

The liners on our dumps are required to last at least twenty years, that is within my lifetime. The liners are themselves made of chemistry that is toxic to the environment because of the concentration caused by their size. I used to go shoot rats at the dump when I was a kid, the stuff in the dumps back then was a lot more biodegradable and less toxic to the environment. I dug in the old homestead dumps around farms for old bottles and almost everything there had turned back to nature except a few old plastic dolls and bottles, even the cans were rusted out. That is not the case nowadays, the chemistry of our waste is highly toxic to the environment.

I like computers but deathdating them causes problems. We put too much faith in computers, I would rather put faith in our minds. They have their purpose but a computer is just a tool that can be used for good and for bad. Same with the internet and all technology, it is all a tool. Social networking can be good but also bad, it is polarizing people. It is not that the tool is bad it is the misuse of it that is bad. I use it for learning and trying to pass on what I have learned after analyzing if things are true. My wife uses facebook and this is mostly used for chitchat and sometimes learning. Some abuse this also and many pass on misconceptions through social media. This is a problem. I learn from my mistakes and also learn from others, evaluating what I see going wrong. I may be considered a little nuts because I evaluate everything but I do find out why things go wrong. I am not the only one that does that, I run into others once in a while who question why we do things in the first place. If we evaluate if we need something in the first place instead of trying to figure out how to fix the problems that it creates we would be better off. Do we need so many electric appliances, can't we take out a manual beater and stir the cake mix we make from scratch? Do we even need the ratrace and economic growth. What's wrong with us, technology has made us crazy.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 11:33 AM
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Just quick note: the news is starting to spread. I think this is the first time NPR has done a story on the sinkhole.
Massive Sinkhole In Louisiana Baffles Officials

Louisiana officials are grappling with a giant sinkhole that's threatening a neighborhood. A salt mine collapsed last year, creating a series of problems regulators say they've never seen before, including tremors and oil and gas leaks and a sinkhole that now covers 9 acres.
They say the sinkhole is 9 acres, yesterday it was 12 today on twitter people keeps saying 20 acres.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


I see your point and get where you are coming from. I believe that human nature lust for power has made our technological advancements take huge steps before we can even evolve with it and show respect for it's power.

AuntB, i'll check on that for you.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 01:56 PM
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Word is spreading that there is a sinkhole in the bayou!!! MSN homepage- on the editor's pick. They are acting like it just appeared. This is great. Here is the article that it links to: 9-acre king of all sinkholes threatens to swallow a whole neighborhood
edit on 21-3-2013 by AuntB because: (no reason given)
They certainly add drama!!!


Sinkholes, bow before your unmerciful king. A collapsing salt mine has caused a nine-acre sinkhole in Louisiana, one that is threatening an entire neighborhood. Residents are being evacuated, and the company that owns the mine, Texas Brine, is paying them $875 a week for temporary housing costs. The Lord of the Sinkholes appeared Aug. 3 and is still growing. Scientists monitoring it say a second cavern may be collapsing. "They caused this damage, and certainly we'll be aggressive in making sure that they pay their bills," Gov. Bobby Jindal says of Texas Brine.

edit on 21-3-2013 by AuntB because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:07 PM
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G'day all,

Well it looks like the seismic testing is still ongoing.
As you can see here, the pulses seem to be mostly at an even rate, about a minute apart.



There was a very brief strong pulse, in the middle of that, that pretty much made my eyebrows rise. 22:53(ish) UTC.

And cross checking it against LA 11



It doesn't seem to have been a calibration pulse.

Also in LA 14 its there,


but the size of it shown makes me think that it wasn't a quake but a very nasty thump in their scanning.

I will admit some concern to the intensity of the the pulses they use to scan with.

M.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:35 PM
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reply to post by AuntB
 


Ok, i've checked on the size and it is between 15-20 acres.



posted on Mar, 21 2013 @ 06:46 PM
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Originally posted by CajunBoy
reply to post by AuntB
 


Ok, i've checked on the size and it is between 15-20 acres.


Holy Guacamole, it looks like they have been hiding the growth rate from the public as well as the other info. And the increase from 8 or 9 acres to 15 to 20 has happened faster than the previous growth by a whole bunch. At this rate the whole salt dome could collapse in on itself in just a few months.



posted on Mar, 22 2013 @ 12:02 AM
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REALLY.....9 acres to 15 to 20 acres, THAT IS DOUBLE........Not good, not good. I read part of the post from rickymouse, and I'd have to agree, this whole salt dome thing was NOT VERY WELL thought out, and also what tetra said also....oxymoron anyone??? May we all be safe......



posted on Mar, 22 2013 @ 01:13 AM
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The latest update from Celestial Convergence is even more disturbing than the last ones. And now they are saying that Lake Peigneur could be even worse that the Bayou Corne sinkhole. I think I see an iceberg in the distance; FULL STEAM AHEAD AND DAMN THE TORPEDOES!!!

SOURCE #1 - Celestial Convergence


Massive Sinkhole In Louisiana Baffles Officials - "Strange Things Happening"; "Doors Pop Open By Themselves"; "You Can Hear The Cracking"?! UPDATE: Sheriff Ackal Says Lake Peigneur Could Be Worse Than Assumption Sinkhole?!



Ernie Boudreaux lives in a trailer on Jambalaya Street in Bayou Corne, La. Strange things have been happening to his home, he says. "It cracks. You can hear it. The doors pop open by themselves," Boudreaux says. The front porch is separating from the trailer and sometimes he smells oil — all problems that started after the sinkhole opened less than a half mile from his house. His neighborhood is under a mandatory evacuation, but Boudreaux comes back a few days a week to care for his dog, Diesel. Houston-based Texas Brine has been mining salt near the Bayou Corne community for more than 40 years. The company is now paying evacuated residents $875 a week to cover temporary housing costs. But Boudreaux, a welder, says he can't find a rental that takes pets the size of Diesel, so he stays with his sister some and then comes home. He wants a more permanent solution. "That $875 a week is hush-hush money — keep everybody quiet and just let it settle down. I say, I'm not letting this settle down. You talking about land, home that we can't come back to," Boudreaux says. "And if you do, it ain't worth nothing."


SOURCE #2 - NPR


Patrick Courreges with the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources says the escaping methane poses a danger. "Want to get that out so that you don't have the risk of homes with enclosed spaces having a concentration of gas buildup that could be flammable or explosive," Courreges says.

Courreges says Texas Brine had plugged and abandoned this salt mine in 2010 after integrity problems. And state rules at the time did not require any continued monitoring. Now scientists have discovered that the side wall of the salt cavern collapsed, causing tremors, the sinkhole and oil and gas leaks. Courreges says they've yet to find a road map for dealing with this unique set of problems.

"When we started looking around [asking] who else has this happened to, and the answer came — and we're still looking — is nobody," he says.

That makes it hard to predict what will happen next.

"It's just like an experiment," says Wilma Subra, a technical adviser to the Louisiana Environmental Action Network. "But the issue is, it is continuing to degrade. So as long as it's degrading, you can't say we've reached the end of degradation and now we can figure out how to remedy."


SOURCE #3 - KATC3


Sheriff Ackal says Lake Peigneur Could be Worse than Assumption Sinkhole



"If we have a collapse there, it would be a hell of a catastrophe and it worries me, it has worried me for many years. Seeing it first hand, I know what could happen," said Iberia Parish Sheriff Louis Ackal.

He vividly remembers the Jefferson Island Salt Mine Collapse in 1980 and is now asking Governor Bobby Jindal to stop AGL Resources from expanding its natural gas storage caverns at Lake Peigneur.

So far, Governor Jindal hasn't responded to the sheriff's letter. Ackal says the sinkhole in Assumption Parish would be a mud puddle compared to what he thinks could happen at the Lake.
edit on 22-3-2013 by happykat39 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2013 @ 01:52 AM
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DAMMIT.........SOMEONE FINALLY ADMITS IT????? OHHH, I'd be SOOOOO POOOOOO'ED

WHY???? MONEY????? B.S.

Have people lost sight of what truly matters in life? Apparently....A VERY sad truth to what will become of our civilization.



posted on Mar, 22 2013 @ 11:57 AM
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I visited lake Penguir a few times, beautiful area. My heart is breaking more and more to see the land my ancestors chose to come to after being expelled from Canada... I hope this is not another expulsion coming down the pike...

Evangeline pray for us.
edit on 22-3-2013 by CajunBoy because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 22 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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Activity is high today in BC and PP. reports of heavy tremors





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