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Paranormal Witness on SyFy: Travis Walton case

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posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by DarthFazer

Here is that episode




Thanks for the link, I haven't seen that show yet, I'm off to buy some popcorn!




posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 11:42 PM
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This is an interesting case. Now I'm not saying I actually believe this but I like to speculate....so don't yell at me but is it possible that Travis and maybe his brother faked this but the crew didn't know...and that's how they passed the lie detector test? Just curious if that was scenerio anyone believes. I understand the logistics of doing something like that is impossible to account for...don't yell or say mean things. I hate that



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 11:49 PM
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Originally posted by DarthFazer

He was taken to a hospital in phoenix, the doctors could find no injuries to Walton besides what appeared to be a hole in his arm from what appeared as a intervenous injection wound. He would have had a hell of a lump on his head or a laceration from a pipe or blunt instrument. There was no head trauma and no drugs found in his system.

Well the only type of drug that would cause these types of hallucinations would be psychedelics and they are essentially undetectable in your body....maybe in hair, definitely not blood.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 02:53 AM
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reply to post by ZetaRediculian
 


there were money problems and no way to finish the job on time.

If the case is a hoax, what possible motivation could Walton and the others have? Two possibilities have been identified: every year, the National Enquirer offered a multi-thousand dollar award for the "Best Case" of the year (up to $100,000 for "positive proof" of ET). Walton and the other crew members divided a $5000 award from the National Enquirer.

The second, and more compelling, motive involved a contract Rogers had with the U.S. Forest Service. Rogers had contracted with the Service to thin out the Turkey Springs area over a year before Walton's experience. He won the contract when he submitted the low bid of $24.70/acre in June of 1974. The contract term was 200 working days ("working days" to allow for bad weather and the long mountain winter) to thin 1277 acres, later reduced to 1205 acres. Rogers was seriously behind schedule and in fact had received an eighty-four day extension (accompanied with a $1.00 per acre penalty for missing the completion date). Only five days of this extension remained at the time of Walton's alleged abduction. At the time of Walton's disappearance, Rogers was in serious trouble: he had over a hundred acres left to finish in five days or he would default on the contract and lose some $2500 -- money sorely needed to get through the winter months -- or he request a second extension and accept another penalty for failing to finish on schedule a second time.

Just two weeks prior to Walton's disappearance, NBC-TV aired a two hour movie featuring the abduction tale of Betty and Barney Hill. Rogers has acknowledged watching the first portion of the movie, the portion that detailed the Hills' "abduction." Klass speculates in his book that "to a man facing two unattractive alternatives on his Turkey Springs contract, the account of the Hills' 'UFO-abduction' could easily suggest a third." By making Turkey Springs the site of an alien abduction, Rogers could claim his men were too afraid to return and continue working -- providing an "act of God" that could result in contract termination with no penalty and full payment to Rogers.

they never worked at night!!! why did they work only on that night??? the men passed the test because only walton and the driver were the only ones in the car that were in on it.

his mother was abnormally calm when she heard he was abducted. before he had told her he would be abducted and not to worry, that he would be ok.

the lie detecter test he took was seriously flawed.

he was not the upstanding citizen his brother claimed him to be. walton and a friend stole payroll checks and forged signatures on them,,They pleaded guilty after all was said and done their record was expunged...so technically his brother was right.

walton had a history of drug use which is very important relating to that injection mark on his arm. It was not near a vein, but would cause the symptoms he had (drug user would know this). According to Steward, when '___' is injected, no traces of the drug can be foundin blood, urine or saliva samples 18-24 hours after injection. When the Waltonsfirst came to Steward's office, Duane was extremely anxious that Travis undergo full
lab tests.

But by later that afternoon, when Dr. Kandell and Dr. Salts arrived,Duane
only wanted a more casual physical check-up. It was not until the afternoon of Nov. 13,
more than 48-hours after Travis's return, that he came to Dr. Kandell's office to
give blood and urine samples for lab analysis. Lab tests of these samples showed no traces
of illicit drugs (passed the 18 to 24 hour where it would have been detected)

Seven days after Walton had disappeared and two days after his sudden reappearance, his story was hitting the local newspapers. The Tucson Arizona Daily Star quoted Duane as saying, in part: "I'm not a UFO buff and neither is my brother" -- this flatly contradicts Duane's earlier statements to UFOlogist Fred Sylvanus.

More telling, though, were the results of the urine analysis performed on a sample from Walton. It showed no trace of drugs, but also no trace of acetone. After going without food for more than a couple of days, the body begins to break down its own fat. The waste product of this is acetone, and it is excreted in the urine. If Walton had been without food for several days, his urine should have shown some traces of acetone. Also, Walton later claimed to have lost ten pounds during his missing five days.

It might be argued that the sample did come from Travis and that he was fed
aboard the UFO. But in his frequent tellings of his alleged experience, Travis
never has mentioned being fed while he was "conscious." It might then be claimed
that perhaps while he was "unconscious," he was fed intravenously and this could
then explain the puncture mark in his right elbow. But as Dr. Kandell noted, the
wound is not over a large vein, which would rule out intravenous feeding.

why did the brother take travis all the way to phoenix for medical care?? there was a medical plce much much closer.

I thought Walton and his best friend Mike Rogers could have rigged up something convincing enough to make the other five think they'd seen a hovering, hostile UFO. * Properly primed with flying saucer talk by Walton and Rogers, with clever theatrics by the duo during the sighting/zapping, with Rogers whisking the crew away after but a few seconds exposure, it wouldn't have taken a "Day the Earth Stood Still" saucer to fool them. After the fact, in the forest gloom, with Walton and the UFO mysteriously gone,




edit on 5-10-2012 by research100 because: added more info
edit on 5-10-2012 by research100 because: (no reason given)
edit on 5-10-2012 by research100 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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Originally posted by Chrisfishenstein
reply to post by Jchristopher5
 


Type in Travis Walton into your search bar if you liked that episode.......There are a couple REALLY long and very in depth threads about this case. You will find them much more interesting than a tv show!!!


Agreed - and Travis is actually an ATS member. He's started a threat or two and was more than willing to answer questions that other members put forth. He's the genuine article in my book.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by Evildead

I wonder, were those humans in the UFO clones or real humans? If they were real humans, does that mean the U.S. military is working with the aliens all these years learning their technology?


I believe it was just the aliens and they created that illusion in his mind to calm him down and sedate him.
edit on 10/5/2012 by maddog99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by research100
reply to post by ZetaRediculian
 


they never worked at night!!! why did they work only on that night??? the men passed the test because only walton and the driver were the only ones in the car that were in on it.

his mother was abnormally calm when she heard he was abducted. before he had told her he would be abducted and not to worry, that he would be ok.

the lie detecter test he took was seriously flawed.

he was not the upstanding citizen his brother claimed him to be. walton and a friend stole payroll checks and forged signatures on them,,They pleaded guilty after all was said and done their record was expunged...so technically his brother was right.

walton had a history of drug use which is very important relating to that injection mark on his arm. It was not near a vein, but would cause the symptoms he had (drug user would know this). According to Steward, when '___' is injected, no traces of the drug can be foundin blood, urine or saliva samples 18-24 hours after injection. When the Waltonsfirst came to Steward's office, Duane was extremely anxious that Travis undergo full
lab tests.

But by later that afternoon, when Dr. Kandell and Dr. Salts arrived,Duane
only wanted a more casual physical check-up. It was not until the afternoon of Nov. 13,
more than 48-hours after Travis's return, that he came to Dr. Kandell's office to
give blood and urine samples for lab analysis. Lab tests of these samples showed no traces
of illicit drugs (passed the 18 to 24 hour where it would have been detected)

Seven days after Walton had disappeared and two days after his sudden reappearance, his story was hitting the local newspapers. The Tucson Arizona Daily Star quoted Duane as saying, in part: "I'm not a UFO buff and neither is my brother" -- this flatly contradicts Duane's earlier statements to UFOlogist Fred Sylvanus.

More telling, though, were the results of the urine analysis performed on a sample from Walton. It showed no trace of drugs, but also no trace of acetone. After going without food for more than a couple of days, the body begins to break down its own fat. The waste product of this is acetone, and it is excreted in the urine. If Walton had been without food for several days, his urine should have shown some traces of acetone. Also, Walton later claimed to have lost ten pounds during his missing five days.


What source are you citing that the lie detector test was "seriously flawed"? They all took multiple polygraph tests. They all passed multiple polygraph tests.

Also, illicit drugs stay in the body for far longer than 18-24 hours. Pot can be detected in urine for 7-10 days, and some narcotics can take even longer for the body to break down.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by maddog99

Originally posted by Evildead

I wonder, were those humans in the UFO clones or real humans? If they were real humans, does that mean the U.S. military is working with the aliens all these years learning their technology?


I believe it was just the aliens and they created that illusion in his mind to calm him down and sedate him.
edit on 10/5/2012 by maddog99 because: (no reason given)


Agree, that sounds logical.

What struck me as odd is that Walton didn't communicate any attempt to communicate with him. You hear about telepathy being used, especially with the Grays. Assuming these were classic Grays from Zeta Reticuli.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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here is my source: www.debunker.com... it is very thorough and includes copies of letters philip j klass sent and received....

they NEVER worked at night except on That night.....use common sense.....
big money problems...this had the PERFECT timing to take care of it.
he didn't eat for 5 days...nothing in the urine that would be there if you haven't eaten in 5 days
he never said he was fed orally or through an iv....the only mark on his body was an injection puncture mark..BUT it
was NOT near a vein so could not be used to give nutrition.
The others could pass the lie detector test if they were set up and THOUGHT they saw a ufo.

during a tape recorded interview travis stated "I rushed into the first phone booth and called my mother" this is a lie...there was no phone in the home she lived in snowflake, nor in the house on the gibson ranch in the mountains.

his brother said there was no dr in snowflake which is true...BUT he took him really far to phoenix when he could have gone 16 miles to show lo to a clinic there.

the other work problem was that the guy who was in charge had already defaulted once..it turned out he was moonlighting, and the forest service didn't know until klass brought them them proof.

edit on 5-10-2012 by research100 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by research100
 


The particular test is pretty much mired in controversy if you look at other sources. How do you explain him passing other tests? He was also hardly a hardened criminal - his check fraud incident happened early in his life, he got probation for it because he had a clean record, and that's the extent of it.

I'm not sure why the whole nighttime thing bothers you. So they worked late one night? They had a job to do and perhaps needed to complete certain tasks by certain dates. I'd have to dive back into the story because I don't remember anything but that the explanation was plausible. These guys all passed more than one test.

I, for one, believe Travis Walton.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 05:12 PM
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reply to post by research100
 


Klass is a notorious shill for the press he couldn't be trusted interesting you mention him, he had his own ulterior agendas.There is good debunking and bad debunking and his MO that agenda is his projecting disbelief hence not open to the possibility. People of his ilk are as much a disservice to truth seeking as the lunatic fringe because they are not open to the possibility. Phil Klass, Jim Oberg, Bill Nye to name a few will use dishonest tactics and be as disingenuous even misleading when faced with facts they can not refute. The prospect of ET interaction does not bode well with them,.they do this religiously.

it's swamp gas

it's a weather balloon

it's a hallucination

It just don't cut it anymore


In this case a conspiracy but the loggers and Walton to concoct a hoax. Walton was hit over the head, the loggers lied blah blah. Yet no proof to back up this claim but an assertion. It;'s easy to make Ad hominem arguments when you cant think of real answers. Klass was a journalist not a scientist and nor would i claim to be qualified to make such a grandiose statement: Walton is a HOAXER unless i had smoking gun proof. I have done debunking myself with what tools i have, the abundance of hoaxes on youtube and abroad disgust me. But when people like Klass become consumed with debunking even hunting Walton and many others who have claimed to have had experiences with a personal vendetta it's quite telling. He would defame you and assasinate your character grasping at straws if he couldn't debunk you. Here is an interesting article by Richard Dolan on Klass it says a lot about Klass.


keyholepublishing.com...

Philip Klass, who died in August 2005, was for decades the single most prominent UFO debunker in the world. He was also the most effective, at least in relation to his ability at working the media and influencing the academic community. He wrote several books on the topic, and was a senior avionics editor for many years at Aviation Week and Space Technology. The letter was dated August 15, 1980, and addressed to Dr. A. G. McNamara of the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics. It was unsolicited, and is a straightforward character smear of Stanton Friedman, who was at the time in the process of moving to Canada. According to Klass, Friedman was a "full-time UFO lecturer (of the ‘snake-oil salesman’ variety)." He was moving to Canada "to become its chief UFO Guru." Friedman was "quite a showman" whose lectures were "so filled with half-truths and falsehoods that it would take me several hours to offer a rebuttal. And like wrestling with an octopus, when you manage to pin down one leg, the other seven are still thrashing about." The letter disparages Friedman’s professional credentials as a nuclear physicist, twice refers to Friedman’s "mountainous ego," and calls him "something of an outcast" within the UFO "movement." All in all, a nasty and underhanded little letter. Better yet, Klass enclosed a "White Paper" he prepared on Friedman "that illustrates the man’s modus-operandi and his distortion of facts." (This White Paper was not included in the material I saw at the archives.) But why send the letter at all? Klass said he wanted to warn the good people at NRC that Friedman would now in all likelihood be directing his focus on them. "I can assure you," Klass wrote, "that you and your associates will be publicly accused of a UFO Coverup (or ‘Cosmic Coverup,’ as he is prone to say) that ‘dwarfs the Watergate scandal.’" Also, "to alert you to deal cautiously with him knowing he is inclined to distort the facts and exploit any ambiguity in your statements." The final statement is nice: "Please treat this letter in confidence, sharing it with appropriate associates as you see fit." In other words, tell as many people as you can, but behind Friedman’s back, please. I found it ironic that Klass twice mentioned Friedman’s "mountainous ego." Klass evidently felt he had no such ego problems, despite the chutzpah of such unsolicited character assassination. While he and Friedman had frequently debated publicly, their relations for years had been at least professional and cordial. [As an aside, I will mention that I never knew Klass personally, nor had I ever seen his signature before. But I have spent about 30 years doing amateur graphology (e.g. handwriting analysis). It’s been a longtime hobby of mine, and I have a small graphological library to which I occasionally refer. Klass’s signature is very partially cut off at the bottom, but you can still make it out fairly well. One thing I noticed about it is the extremely wide "P" in his first name, as well as the very wide loops of his letter "l". Any graphologist will tell you this is a typical sign of writers who are personally vain and conceited. Mountainous ego, indeed.Ultimately, I interpret this letter less as a well-meaning warning than as a direct attempt at fear mongering, aimed at scientists who were already uncomfortable with receiving UFO reports. And this was exactly the effect he achieved, judging by the internal memo it generated.

Ten days after Klass’s letter, a memo from J. L. Locke to W. A. Cumming and P. J. Choquette at the NRC mentioned the letter and worried that "we can ill afford the publicity [Friedman] will generate for us." The next statement speaks volumes about how these men thought of UFOs:

"Since there is no science in the subject of UFO’s perhaps we should think again about the possibility of turning the so-called ‘UFO file’ over to some body with no responsibility for the conduct of scientific research."One can’t help but think about the thousands of Canadian citizens who reported UFOs to the RCMP in the hopes that someone might be able to make sense of it all, or at least hoping somehow to advance the general cause of human knowledge. Oh, well. Instead, it looks as though no one was doing anything more than filing them away. This is a pity, since many reports that were sent to the NRC were truly quite interesting, seemingly very clearly observed, and intelligently described.

The National Research Council wasn’t able to unload entirely its UFO responsibilities. However, it was able to divest itself of most of the UFO files it had been holding. Apparently directly as a result of Klass’s letter, the decision was made that, as of January 1, 1981, any UFO file more than a year old (with names appropriately removed) was to be turned over to the Archives Branch of Public Archives of Canada. Incidentally, I was a bit startled to see the name "R. W. Dolan" at the top of the relevant document. I don’t know who this person was. What Klass did here was impressive. He created a bogeyman for a group of easily frightened scientists and enabled them to unload at least some of their connection with the topic of UFOs. Seen in the broader context of his career, this was his typical modus operandi.

For example, Klass had done a similar thing years before against scientist James McDonald, which I recounted in my book, UFOs and the National Security State. In 1968, McDonald had received funding from the Office of Naval Research to conduct atmospheric and cloud research in Australia. McDonald was one of the leading atmospheric physicists in the world, but was also prominent in the field of UFO research. By December of 1968, Klass learned of McDonald’s research money, courtesy of Robert Low (number two man of the infamous Condon Committee at the University of Colorado). Klass launched a letter writing campaign to bureaucrats at ONR, asking who had been responsible for funding this; moreover, he inquired, who would be funding McDonald’s upcoming trip to Europe? Klass clearly was trying to intimidate ONR – as senior editor of Aviation Week, he was in a position to do so. ONR, for its part, replied that it was satisfied with McDonald’s work, and indeed had no objection to his UFO research. Still, ONR did discontinue future funding for McDonald.

Another Klassic incident, to be mentioned in my next book, had to do with a UFO symposium which took place at the University of Nebraska on November 11 and 12, 1983 – organized by the MUFON State Director for Nebraska, Ray Boeche. Klass had learned about the event three months in advance, and immediately placed telephone calls to the Conference Coordinator, Russ Free and the Director of Conferences at the University, Robert Mortensen. Essentially, Klass wanted to know why a prestigious university would sponsor such a conference. Apparently, he was so obnoxious that the two administrators contacted MUFON International Director Walt Andrus. Moreover, the University’s Assistant to the Chancellor, Dr. John K. Yost, actually started an investigation. The reason, in part, was that Klass had said there was a political agenda to the conference. In the words of Mortensen, "Mr. Klass has a personal feeling that the nature of this conference seriously questions the integrity of the United States government. He feels that there is no scientific evidence to support the claims of the presenters and indicated that these organizations, by publicly questioning the government, lend support to the Communist movement."

That’s right. The communist movement. At any event, the conference took place as scheduled.

Thus, this most recently discovered letter is simply one more bit of evidence relating to the "legacy" of Philip J. Klass. Anyone who has surveyed the man’s life and career should understand by now that any such so-called legacy of his has nothing to do with his analysis of the UFO phenomenon, which was always shallow and politically motivated. Rather, it will be for his underhanded, sleazy, behind-the-scenes efforts to intimidate academically and scientifically qualified institutions – as well as mainstream U.S. media – away from the study of UFOs. This is work, moreover, that strongly appears to have been done on behalf of elements of the United States intelligence community. That fact may not yet be proven to the satisfaction of everyone, but the ducks are certainly lining up.

end.




Without objectivity and open mindedness it's a just a disservice to truth
edit on 5-10-2012 by DarthFazer because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 05:21 PM
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Anagram time for ATS :

TCA

Edit : Love Paranormal witness .. especially the last episode about Travis abduction

he actualy controlled a space craft for a bit

that part was unknow to me until i saw the real story on PW
they finaly disclose everything in those show
people just dont pay attention because Obama didnt say to watch syfy

the real disclosure was actualy happening on Syfy under the radar of the mass
but available to everyone
edit on 10/5/2012 by Ben81 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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reply to post by DarthFazer
 


From my observations of people, even very smart people will have mental barriers they put up in their minds that these things can't be true, and many do this because if it were true to them, they would have to confront other implications that their low or self stunted spiritual growth is not ready, or able to accept.

That sherriff and the shrike is a perfect example of what I'm talking about..

I thought this latest show was very well done and well worth watching..

I know in my own mind that what happened to him was a real event, and not some hoax as some think..
edit on 5-10-2012 by alienreality because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 06:17 PM
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Do a search here on ATS. Travis Walton was once posting here about a year or two ago.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 06:55 PM
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Originally posted by Jchristopher5

Originally posted by Logarock

Originally posted by thedoctorswife

Originally posted by imitator

Originally posted by thedoctorswife

Maybe your more au fait with the details than i am, but why would his friends bust him over his head, ive seen it mentioned earlier that Travis had employment issues with regard to his contract, b;ut why would they do that?


Only his buddies might know, it could of been an accident... maybe they thought they killed Travis by accident and left him for dead?
edit on 4-10-2012 by imitator because: (no reason given)


Mmnn, you think these are the sort of men that would leave him for dead? they were tough no nonsense hard working guys, personally i dont see them running away from their responsibilities, that is the feeling i have about them anyway.



Maybe we have all see these sorts of lame tales. Hit over the head and dreamed of UFOs.....stuff traped in his mind from UFO mags indeed? Why didnt he see playboy bunnies, mother goose and Santa? If someone hit you over the head would you see red dragons? Maybe Glyndwr riding through the glenn? Noswiath daa! Yes! The Lady in the Lake!
edit on 4-10-2012 by Logarock because: sp


Yes, maybe we could imagine all sorts of things with head trauma.

However, what we can't imagine is 5 witnesses observing you being zapped by a UFO, and all passing polygraph tests about the sighting.

Why try to imagine this didn't happen? Does it make you feel better somehow? Follow the facts. The facts clearly show that Travis had an out-of-this-world experience.


no I am with you here. Just saying that anything could come to mind if such were the case with trauma.



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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Originally posted by Jchristopher5
I just watched a mind-blowing episode regarding the Travis Walton case. Perhaps the best case for an alien presence known. Here are a summary of the facts:

1. Back from a day of logging, the crew was headed home when they witnessed strange lights in the Arizona forest.
2. As they got closer they all claimed to see a brilliantly lit, beautiful, disk shaped metallic object.
3. Walton, who knew little fear, got out of their truck and walked towards the craft. The crew shouted for him to come back but he refused to listen.
4. He as taken up into the craft and the crew fled in fear.
5. They reported this to the local sheriff who thought they were lying or pulling a prank. Or worse, murder.
6. All except for one passed a lie detector test about Walton being taken by the UFO. The other one passed it years later.
7. Walton was gone for several days, and came back unshaven in the same clothes.
8. Walton told of 4 foot beings and a medical exam. He remember a lot about his visit, and being let off an enormous craft.
9. The police detective who administered the lie detector tests calculated the odds at over 1 million to one that all of these guys could have been lying.

SyFy will reshot this. Check it out if you get time. Anyone else catch it?

edit on 4-10-2012 by Jchristopher5 because: Typos fixed (probably still missed some)


You are an excellent example of gullibility. You're wrong, this tale of flim-flam is not the best case for alleged alien "presence", the Hill's case beats it by a mile. And even the Hill's case has been proven to be a tale. You are not alone in believing the Walton case really happened as claimed, it is another believers' mantra.

Nothing that you repeat above is based on fact and the explanations by those who have done in-depth research reflect the truth. Google "Travis Walton Hoax" and you'll see

Here is a source for another nail in Walton's bs story:
Sherrif’s nephew claims Travis Walton Hoax well known?
ufomedia.blogspot.com...

Here's another one:
Bad UFOs: Skepticism, UFOs, and The Universe
badufos.blogspot.com...

You can also go to youtube for the visuals.

Do yourself a favor that is sure to improve and enrich your life, DON'T BELIEVE EVERYTHING!



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 07:23 PM
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even if you set aside the lie detecter tests, that doesn't change the rest of it.

it's not that travis did something when he was younger...it's that his brother LIED about it, it calls in the integrity of the things the brother says...

no way in hades that job would EVER be completed.... they NEVER worked at night...yeah I got a big problem with that...and this happens at the perfect time for the boss so he can claim an act of god and the workers don't want to go back to work...how convenient for him!

how did he call his mom? travis said he called her..no phone in either home she lived in...that is a LIE..calls into question what else is he lying about.


Originally posted by flashtrum


reply to post by research100
 


The particular test is pretty much mired in controversy if you look at other sources. How do you explain him passing other tests? He was also hardly a hardened criminal - his check fraud incident happened early in his life, he got probation for it because he had a clean record, and that's the extent of it.

I'm not sure why the whole nighttime thing bothers you. So they worked late one night? They had a job to do and perhaps needed to complete certain tasks by certain dates. I'd have to dive back into the story because I don't remember anything but that the explanation was plausible. These guys all passed more than one test.

I, for one, believe Travis Walton.
edit on 5-10-2012 by research100 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 07:24 PM
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Originally posted by research100
here is my source: www.debunker.com... it is very thorough and includes copies of letters philip j klass sent and received....

they NEVER worked at night except on That night.....use common sense.....
big money problems...this had the PERFECT timing to take care of it.
he didn't eat for 5 days...nothing in the urine that would be there if you haven't eaten in 5 days
he never said he was fed orally or through an iv....the only mark on his body was an injection puncture mark..BUT it
was NOT near a vein so could not be used to give nutrition.
The others could pass the lie detector test if they were set up and THOUGHT they saw a ufo.

during a tape recorded interview travis stated "I rushed into the first phone booth and called my mother" this is a lie...there was no phone in the home she lived in snowflake, nor in the house on the gibson ranch in the mountains.

his brother said there was no dr in snowflake which is true...BUT he took him really far to phoenix when he could have gone 16 miles to show lo to a clinic there.

the other work problem was that the guy who was in charge had already defaulted once..it turned out he was moonlighting, and the forest service didn't know until klass brought them them proof.

edit on 5-10-2012 by research100 because: (no reason given)


I clicked on your link which is a link to a 1976 typed up newsletter referencing the National Enquirer and their involvement. I'm sure that publication didn't have their own interests in mind.

Let's look at some facts - direct from the people who went through the actual incident:

1. This crew wasn't a close group of friends by any stretch. No reason to protect each other.
2. They said they worked until sunset EVERY NIGHT. Not just that night, every night. This the CREW DIRECT TESTIMONY.
3. The discussion in the truck just prior to the event was to work even longer hours to pick up the slack. There is no conspiracy that they only worked till dark one time.
4. The crew described the object as like "a shiny new Camaro" or "Terrifying but Beautiful". This hardly describes how Travis Walton "rigged up" a fake UFO.
5. Mike, who owned the contract, WAS NOT THE DRIVER Therefor, your conspiracy would have to involve at least three people, not two (the one where you say it was a financial issue).
6. This is more of an opinion, but if you watched these gentlemen interviewed almost 40 years later, I doubt you would want to see what these guys saw. It's in their voice, their eyes, their body language. Aside from Walton, who did write a book, there was little for these guys to gain financially.
7. During the search for Travis, two individuals were walking around with Geiger Counters. The crew asked to be scanned for radiation. There was none. Realizing they had changed their clothes, they offered up their hard hats, which clearly showed exposure to high radiation. The two gentleman, upon reading the hard hats, left the scene quickly and were never identified.
8. Sheriff Gellespie eventually came to believe that these boys were not covering anything up.
9. The cops were working a 20 mile parameter and found no trace of Travis. There was a manhunt which included "a hard target search of every gas station, residence, warehouse, farmhouse, henhouse, outhouse and doghouse in the area" (apologies Tommy Lee Jones). No evidence of foul play of ANY kind.
10. Cy Gillson - one of the top-rated pros at administering polygraphs in the state of Arizona, who administered the initial tests to a scared bunch of uneducated young men without legal representation - says the results were 97% accurate. His quote? "It was not possible for these particular individuals to beat me at my game".

The failed poly you reference was administered for commercial gain, by an organization that frequently publishes headlines such as "Elvis still Alive, bowling in Alabama" or "Aliens abducted JFK". I'm sorry but your theories don't hold water when compared to the facts and the direct statements of those that witnessed the incident as well as those who attempted to put together a case against a crime that never happened.
edit on 5-10-2012 by flashtrum because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by The Shrike

Originally posted by Jchristopher5
I just watched a mind-blowing episode regarding the Travis Walton case. Perhaps the best case for an alien presence known. Here are a summary of the facts:

1. Back from a day of logging, the crew was headed home when they witnessed strange lights in the Arizona forest.
2. As they got closer they all claimed to see a brilliantly lit, beautiful, disk shaped metallic object.
3. Walton, who knew little fear, got out of their truck and walked towards the craft. The crew shouted for him to come back but he refused to listen.
4. He as taken up into the craft and the crew fled in fear.
5. They reported this to the local sheriff who thought they were lying or pulling a prank. Or worse, murder.
6. All except for one passed a lie detector test about Walton being taken by the UFO. The other one passed it years later.
7. Walton was gone for several days, and came back unshaven in the same clothes.
8. Walton told of 4 foot beings and a medical exam. He remember a lot about his visit, and being let off an enormous craft.
9. The police detective who administered the lie detector tests calculated the odds at over 1 million to one that all of these guys could have been lying.

SyFy will reshot this. Check it out if you get time. Anyone else catch it?

edit on 4-10-2012 by Jchristopher5 because: Typos fixed (probably still missed some)


You are an excellent example of gullibility. You're wrong, this tale of flim-flam is not the best case for alleged alien "presence", the Hill's case beats it by a mile. And even the Hill's case has been proven to be a tale. You are not alone in believing the Walton case really happened as claimed, it is another believers' mantra.

Nothing that you repeat above is based on fact and the explanations by those who have done in-depth research reflect the truth. Google "Travis Walton Hoax" and you'll see

Here is a source for another nail in Walton's bs story:
Sherrif’s nephew claims Travis Walton Hoax well known?
ufomedia.blogspot.com...

Here's another one:
Bad UFOs: Skepticism, UFOs, and The Universe
badufos.blogspot.com...

You can also go to youtube for the visuals.

Do yourself a favor that is sure to improve and enrich your life, DON'T BELIEVE EVERYTHING!


I don't appreciate your snarky tone. I also completely disagree with your foolish analysis.

This is an outstanding example. Due to the number of witnesses, the polygraph tests, and consistent stories for 37 years.

You are wrong, deal with it.



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by Jchristopher5
 
There will be more and more alien encounters toward the year 2013 as people more and more seek out these entities. They are not extraterrestrial but from the dimension next to us . When a person dies they step right next door ,leaving their body behind. The beings have also abducted people in Pennsylvania , and take their insides and parts of their bodies including their blood. This guy was lucky and came back .






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