Giving up the dependant life, where to start? You should ALL be in on this!

page: 1
4

log in

join

posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:21 PM
link   
When I watch documentaries like "Walmart, high cost for low price" and ect, it becomes more and more apparent that small businesses, farms, and any kind of independent producing functions are being squeezed out. We all know that TPTB want to suck the independence and freedom from us until we're spineless and dependent.

For example; I grew up in the city here in Tennessee, and although some people out of my family used to hunt, none of them hunt anymore. Know why? Because they don't need to anymore. My grandparents can get to a superstore of some kind wherever they are. So, I don't know how to hunt. I have a general idea, but that's limited to what you can learn from hunting videos on youtube. I have never shot an animal, and I don't know if I could... much less rip its skin off and dig through its organs. I don't know which animals are better to eat, which ones have more protein, which ones are more prone to disease, or anything.

I also have no idea where to find herbs, or what they look like. Which plants are edible, which ones are poison.

You know why I don't know anything about that stuff?

Because I grew up in the city, with a family that always had government assistance, or accepted free food from the methodist churches. No one in my family had to hunt, because they preferred the hand-outs.

You know what I do for fun? Half the time, it involves some kind of technology.

That disgusts me.

I love chicken, its my favorite meat... but I have no idea where it comes from, how its processed, killed, cleaned, or how it lived when it was alive. The only thing I know is that there are packages of chicken thighs at Kroger for three dollars, and they taste good. If Kroger and the other big stores were gone, I'd have no idea how to get chicken... or any kind of meat.

I used to fish for fun when I was a kid, but I always threw the fish back. I don't know how to clean, scale, gut, or cook it.

You know what I know how to do?

Budget whatever fixed amount comes in on EBT, or from work. Make sure we can buy enough food for the next month. Sure, that's a good skill, but without the money, the standard job, the bank accounts, and the superstores, who knows where food would come from?

I know how to clean the apartment when its dirty, and do dishes. I know how to fix a broken playstation, and how to cook instant foods. And, when I was younger, I used to steal from stores, and it was a skill of mine. But that's about it.

When I was introduced to the world of conspiracies, I made my own website, dragged all my friends to it, and had a small little club of theorist teenagers for a while. But you know what we did? We logged on, to talk about conspiracies, or we met at my house to talk conspiracies. We never actually went to the streets to open eyes, and we never tried to learn to hunt, use weapons, obtain our own food, obtain and filter our own water, or make a plan of how to build a more independent life from government assistance, big business, and the overwhelming beast of American government that constricts society until we have no independence left. The most we ever did was practice shooting bottles with bb guns.

I live in an apartment with my fiance and two roomates. We struggle to make the bills, and still have food, even though we don't have EBT anymore.

I don't want this anymore. I hate feeling dependent on the big machine that I hate. I want us to learn how to make it on our own.

We've made a plan to move to a town in the middle of nowhere, where we have forests and places to hunt, and we have plenty of free space to spend time outside rather than inside watching tv.

Does anyone else want to break away from the dependence drug? Where do I start?

It's like starting from scratch. I don't have a roll model for this, because I don't really personally know anyone who lives off the land or away from the city. I know a few online, but that's it.

I want us to break away from this way of life.

Where do we start?




posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:31 PM
link   
A great place to start is with Jack Spirko's podcast, cleverly titled "The Survival Podcast". There are a lot of other good podcasts with topics on how to get started.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:38 PM
link   
Getting out of the city is a great place to start.

Take camping trips, a night at a time at first... then two, three. As you get more acclimated to doing things like buildings fires and hauling water start to take less gear with you. Get books from your local area or state that list wild edibles and try to find them.

If you can get a place to live outside the city then you can keep your own chickens, and various other animals. Chickens are easy to care for and butcher. I would recommend rabbits for additional meat and goats for milk/meat.

Hunting is an awesome method of getting food, but it requires licenses and the purchase of firearms, tags, etc. Not to mention you can only do it seasonally. Growing/raising your own is the way to go.

No one knows how to do things automatically, you have to get out there and try. Trust me, it will all work out if you put the work in to it.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:39 PM
link   
I am very fortunate to live in a house with a nice backyard. My veggie garden is still small, but its coming on.

Since you live in a flat, look into windowfarms . .MAKE a window-farm.. Get whatever seeds you can and do guerrilla gardening in your neighborhood. grow stuff. to see life blossom takes away any compulsion to be a cog in the machine.

window farm

And stuff tastes awesome fresh - no pesticides. Njoy!



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 01:10 PM
link   
reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


Wow...I hear ya. You are not afraid of big challenges, and that means you have already won half the fight.

I suggest looking for a farm that will trade room and board in exchange for labor on the farm. Although your skills are limited, on the good side... there are no bad habits to unlearn. You could even offer such a trade on craigslist in the farm and garden section.

Also, you have computer and "geek" skills. This is a marketable skill and one in short supply in "the country' and rural areas. I deal with farmers all day at work and most are computer iggnorant. Usually their wives "do all thast stuff" on the computer. Computer and game repair... computer tutorials and instruction in exchange for farm skills and 'mentoring" from some of the locals and teaching hunting skills. you could put up handbills and pamphlets in the neighboring country stores.

Also, most farmers need seasonal unskilled labor... the work is hard, dirty, long, hot,but the pay is usually cash. Most have a cheap trailer for rent on the farm... these are real options for you just starting out.

Also, it is a good chance to see if this life is really for you without too much of an investment.

OK... so you move to the country, move to a farm and work as a laborer, make a little side money with computers and repair, and start to build relationships with people. If you are in any position to buy a pickup, buy a pick up. Preferably American made... Ford, Dodge, Chevy. This often tells people more about you as you drive up than you think. Yes, even country folks profile. Also, the county sheriff won't be so suspicious of you in a pickup truck as he would if you drove a pimped out Toyota or Nissan.. most won't even look at you.

Plus, with a pickup, you can make money... hauling stuff, selling firewood, trading animals, and if you want to live the life you allude to... you are gonna need one anyway. Trucks hold their value, but get an older model in good running order... good mechanical condition is more important than looks... usually around here in NC, a good used truck runs about 2500-5000 dollars. Again, you may have to trade work with the farmer to get the truck if you have no money.

The rest depends on how primitive a lifestyle you want. If you want simple... go no electric, no refridgerators, heat and cook with a wood stove, get water from a well, use the outhouse... if you choose this... don't have kids yet... the county might take them away. Seriously. only after you have really established a self sufficient lifestyle using solar, wood, massive gardens, etc... then consider the family.

I lived in a barn for 3 years and turned it into a nice cabin... did all the work myself. built and used an outhouse, got water from the well, etc. very rewarding and a great way to save loads of money as you have no expenses.

oh, building relationships... I don't know if you are a person of faith, but church is BIG in a rural area. it also has the side benefit of making contacts and introducing you to the local electricians, contractors, other farmers, county agents, firefighters, plumbers, hunters, mechanics etc... all important people to know. plus, once you have gained their trust... someone always has some land for sale to a nice person "such as yourself."

As for primitive living... read the Foxfire Books.. the first one was free online. An entertaining read on turn of the century Appalachia and during the Depression... everything you need to know on cabin building, dowsing, wood and wood fires, cooking on a wood stove, wells, furniture making,gardening, killing animals and dressing, etc. just plain mountain and country living.

Once you have a shelter, a source of some income, water, food, heat... get a few chickens.. the simplest of all into livestock. Look in Country Living and Smallstock Journal or New Pioneering or Mother Earth News Mags to see best ways to build a chicken pen or ask at the local feed store. tell them your situation and most will gladly help. then you will have eggs to eat and sell. I know a 14 yr old girl with 200 chickens and a small business selling eggs. if she can, you can too.

Must have a garden. Start small, learn your mistakes, and grow some more. Ask folks and most will gladly help with advice. Now you have tomatoes to eat and sell. Then ask a farmers wife to teach you how to can and put up... not hard, just time consuming. After a couple of years, your skills will be such you could start a stand or go to the farmers market and sell.

No need to teach these skills here, already good sources of info here and in Grit mags and others already listed.

The key is to see if this life is really for you. It is hard, cold, hot, optimism turns to disgust and back again... but no life is freer or more rewarding.

Good luck.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 03:53 PM
link   
The first thing you have to do is establish a relationship with nature. Just learning to be quiet and observe is one of the hardest skills to acquire yet anyone can do it if they are motivated enough. Start by using all your senses more; listen to the birds, smell every plant you touch, look for signs of animal activity. The basis of all survival skills is awareness, as awareness grows you will be able to find game, water, firemaking materials and plants for food and medicine.

Read on how the Native Americans lived. See if you can find the plants they used, build a shelter like they did or weave a basket from vines.

As mentioned earlier, go camping and increase your time outdoors gradually while scaling back on gear and seeing what you can substitute from natural resources around you.
I'm fortunate to have spent my entire life doing things many would consider survival skills. If you have any specific questions feel free to PM me. I can recommend many books on different skills. Just decide which ones you want to tackle first.

Most of all remember that it isn't all that terribly hard, patience and perseverance are the traits that will serve you best in learning these new skills. The greatest reward of all is knowing that the Earth is truly your home, that everything you need to live is all around you and instead of being a scary place the woods is a place of comfort and security.

Good luck. I applaud your motivations for what you'd like to do. I think your heart is on the right path.
edit on 2-10-2012 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 08:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by XxNightAngelusxX
When I watch documentaries like "Walmart, high cost for low price" and ect, it becomes more and more apparent that small businesses, farms, and any kind of independent producing functions are being squeezed out. We all know that TPTB want to suck the independence and freedom from us until we're spineless and dependent.

For example; I grew up in the city here in Tennessee, and although some people out of my family used to hunt, none of them hunt anymore. Know why? Because they don't need to anymore. My grandparents can get to a superstore of some kind wherever they are. So, I don't know how to hunt. I have a general idea, but that's limited to what you can learn from hunting videos on youtube. I have never shot an animal, and I don't know if I could... much less rip its skin off and dig through its organs. I don't know which animals are better to eat, which ones have more protein, which ones are more prone to disease, or anything.

I also have no idea where to find herbs, or what they look like. Which plants are edible, which ones are poison.

You know why I don't know anything about that stuff?

Because I grew up in the city, with a family that always had government assistance, or accepted free food from the methodist churches. No one in my family had to hunt, because they preferred the hand-outs.

You know what I do for fun? Half the time, it involves some kind of technology.

That disgusts me.

I love chicken, its my favorite meat... but I have no idea where it comes from, how its processed, killed, cleaned, or how it lived when it was alive. The only thing I know is that there are packages of chicken thighs at Kroger for three dollars, and they taste good. If Kroger and the other big stores were gone, I'd have no idea how to get chicken... or any kind of meat.

I used to fish for fun when I was a kid, but I always threw the fish back. I don't know how to clean, scale, gut, or cook it.

You know what I know how to do?

Budget whatever fixed amount comes in on EBT, or from work. Make sure we can buy enough food for the next month. Sure, that's a good skill, but without the money, the standard job, the bank accounts, and the superstores, who knows where food would come from?

I know how to clean the apartment when its dirty, and do dishes. I know how to fix a broken playstation, and how to cook instant foods. And, when I was younger, I used to steal from stores, and it was a skill of mine. But that's about it.

When I was introduced to the world of conspiracies, I made my own website, dragged all my friends to it, and had a small little club of theorist teenagers for a while. But you know what we did? We logged on, to talk about conspiracies, or we met at my house to talk conspiracies. We never actually went to the streets to open eyes, and we never tried to learn to hunt, use weapons, obtain our own food, obtain and filter our own water, or make a plan of how to build a more independent life from government assistance, big business, and the overwhelming beast of American government that constricts society until we have no independence left. The most we ever did was practice shooting bottles with bb guns.

I live in an apartment with my fiance and two roomates. We struggle to make the bills, and still have food, even though we don't have EBT anymore.

I don't want this anymore. I hate feeling dependent on the big machine that I hate. I want us to learn how to make it on our own.

We've made a plan to move to a town in the middle of nowhere, where we have forests and places to hunt, and we have plenty of free space to spend time outside rather than inside watching tv.

Does anyone else want to break away from the dependence drug? Where do I start?

It's like starting from scratch. I don't have a roll model for this, because I don't really personally know anyone who lives off the land or away from the city. I know a few online, but that's it.

I want us to break away from this way of life.

Where do we start?


My friend, the situation is urgent imho.

Get out now. Just pick a place and go.

Everything else will follow.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 09:43 PM
link   
Good for you, glad you are opening your eyes to the he'll we really live in.

I don't know what part of Tn you are in but there is a great little town in southeast Tn called Spencer. Its in Van Buren County over by cookeville and is a wonderful small town that could possibly be well suited for what you are wanting to do. I lived there for a while and was going to make it my BOL but eventually decided on ND for other reasons. Its close to cookeville and only about 50 miles from Knoxville so your not totally isolated.

As for your interest in learning to be more self sufficient, I would suggest checking out Mother Earth News magazine and Foxfire books. The Mother Earth Magazine has a pretty good online magazine that will give you a lot of information without a subscription but the actual magazines are great. They're loaded with gardening tips and plenty of info on raising, butchering, and preserving food animals as well as hunting.

The Foxfire books are just simply great and you can download them in PDF format for free online. I used to have the link saved where you can download them but since I have them all I must have deleted the link. Just search "Foxfire download" and I'm sure you'll find them. They offer some excellent info on living off the land, gardening, hunting, fishing, and much much more.

Good luck to you on your journey to awakening!



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 08:10 AM
link   
The biggest single thing you can do to get some money by getting independent is this: quit eating out. Learn to cook at home and learn to cook from scratch.

My wife does this. As a rule of thumb, whatever you cook yourself costs about ONE FIFTH the price of buying it from a restaurant.

Walmart actually runs a commercial about this---how you can buy the ingredients for a "breakfast egg & muffin" for 20% of the cost of buying one in a fast food restaurant. And you can cook it in less time that you'd spend waiting in line in the drive-thru.

A crock-pot is an excellent first step. Your grandma used one, probably at least every week. For $30-60, you can get one. The fancy ones have a computer you can program to shut off or come on at a certain point. Stews and soups are excellent, and if you have a backyard garden, you have a source of veggies. Veggies may seem inexpensive, but over the long haul your own will cost less. And every trip to walmart you DONT make = money saved on everything else you didn't buy.

The next step is to start using your freezer. Go shopping for meat the day or 2 after major holidays. The groceries have a big push for grilling meat at major holidays. On the 5th or 5th of July, you can buy steaks for about half the price and then freeze them. We did it this year, and did so well that some friends came to help me cart it all home.

The larger the piece of meat you cook, the more money you save. Don't buy a pre-cut spiral-sliced ham---read online and buy an uncut ham. They cost half as much. Keep your eyes out for an old smoker on craigslist or similar. If you buy a 17 or 20 lb. brisket, you can get the meat for 2 bucks a pound. You'll freeze most of that, and have meat in your freezer for lunches that will serve 15-20 meals over the next few months. And all for a saturday spent smoking the meat.

When you make soup or chili or a brisket, freeze half of it. A lot of meat dishes freeze extremely well, particularly ham, brisket, steak and roast meat.

Between meat on sale and your garden, your freezer should be so full that you need another freezer. Don't buy a new one--get one used from the paper or a local flea market or garage sale. I paid $75 for a 'used' freezer chest that retails for $300.

Get yourself an electric carving knife. Keep your eye out for a deli-slicer, but only buy a good one.

Then save up and buy a vacuum sealer. That will extend the life of your food in the freezer, and get you ready to dehydrate your own food---again for soups and stews, as well as snacks and emergency rations.

If you add in hunting, fishing, and pick-your-own at local farms, you are only a hair's-breadth away from independence...






top topics



 
4

log in

join