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Possible Nova Just Occured

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posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 11:44 AM
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Excuse me to the mods for I'm not sure if this post belongs in this section, but I wanted to get the information out in case there were any astronomers out there on the dark side of Earth.

www.astronomerstelegram.org...


MASTER-Amur auto-detection system discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 05h 43m 17.95s +09d 31m 14.8s on 2012-09-30.78510 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 13.4m (limit 17.9m). The OT is seen in 2 images. There is no minor planet at this place. We have reference image without OT on 2011-11-02.73236 UT with magnitude limit in 'V' filter 18.8m.

There is a faint star (magnitude ~21) within 1.5" from the position of the OT visible on POSS-II plates. Color-combined (BRIR) DSS finder chart is uploaded to master.sai.msu.ru... (10'x10' FOV).

There is nothing at this position in USNO-B1.0, GSC 2.3.2, 2MASS, 1RXS and GCVS catalogs and in AAVSO VSX. This area is not covered by SDSS, CSS and GALEX. Nothing is visible on the sum of 3 NEAT images of this filed taken on 2001 Sep. 23 (limiting magnitude 20.5).

The galactic latitude is 10.5 deg. Based on the amplitude of variability (more than 7 magnitudes) we suggest that MASTER OT J054317.95+093114.8 is likely a cataclysmic variable (dwarf nova or classical Nova) in outburst.


Link for follow up observation

 


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edit on 10/3/2012 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 11:57 AM
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Cool, now if someone can explain what it means to us would be helpful.

Also how far away it is, will it affect us, and if so when. Also, how long ago it happened.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by Julie Washington
 


A nova is the result of an exploding star and is an extremely energetic event. By the magnitude we can tell how bright the object is the lower the number the brighter the object. An 8 is pretty bright en.wikipedia.org... for comparison sake Sirius is the brightest star in the sky and it's a -1 of magnitude. This event should have no impact on us physically it's just real cool for amateur astronomers.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:03 PM
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reply to post by adept2u
 

Maybe this would be better on the Space Exploration Forum? (or maybe the science forum??)

Is there some "Alien and UFO" angle to this possible supernova?



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:04 PM
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It means nothing to us. However, its cool.

A nearby supernova (which is completely a different process than a nova), could cause a second "sun" in the night sky, making night as bright as day for a few months. And we will hopefully get to see that in our lifetime...there is a nearby star that will probably go supernova "soon"..... But even then, no cataclysmic events.
edit on 2-10-2012 by phroziac because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


I believe you're right if a nice mod would move it or tell me how to I'd appreciate it. I looked in the forums before I posted this for something spacey and didn't see the correct forum. Apologies to the members



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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reply to post by adept2u
 
S&F for you on this , i do think it best to put this in "space" for more to read, here is a link to the pics master.sai.msu.ru... it seems something did indeed go "nova" for in the far right the stars are not as big as in the center and far left, got to link to see the pics.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 


Do you mean Betelgeuse?



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 
yes this is true the one nova you are referring too is Betelgeuse, here is the link to that one news.discovery.com... , 2012 is not the end date for it, or so they say.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by phroziac
 


That would be Betelgeuse I believe you are thinking of.
As far as I remember it is collapsing right now at the rate of 400km's (?) per second.
But don't take my word for it.
I'd research harder to confirm, but this is slightly off topic anyway.

(I am a bit late posting this obviously!)
edit on 2-10-2012 by Toadmund because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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reply to post by adept2u
 


A magnitude of 8 is still fairly dim, and barely visible to the naked eye in even the best of seeing. A decent set of binoculars or a telescope would definitely help, but you'll still want to be a good ways away from any light pollution.

reply to post by phroziac
 


It means a lot to science. Novas of any sort provide a wealth of data to be analyzed which can help us further our understanding on the universe.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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That's very sad that a star has died..or exploded. Why? Isn't the sun a star...so does that mean it will eventually explode too......and is that part of the black triangle seen on the sun recently?



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by Meldionne1
 


Yes eventually our sun will die but not for a long, long time.
We have nothing to fear.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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Thats pretty big and its not at the same time. That was.
I hope no one was around at the time :|
RIP Betelgeuse, you had the coolest name for a star.



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 12:18 AM
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So whats the difference between a supernova and a nova? They both explode. Can we see it on our walmart brand telescopes?



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 01:06 AM
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Originally posted by phroziac
It means nothing to us. However, its cool.

A nearby supernova (which is completely a different process than a nova), could cause a second "sun" in the night sky, making night as bright as day for a few months. And we will hopefully get to see that in our lifetime...there is a nearby star that will probably go supernova "soon"..... But even then, no cataclysmic events.
edit on 2-10-2012 by phroziac because: (no reason given)


I think a second sun would have dangerous physiological implications to sleep patterns.



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 01:38 AM
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Originally posted by adept2u
reply to post by Julie Washington
 


A nova is the result of an exploding star and is an extremely energetic event. By the magnitude we can tell how bright the object is the lower the number the brighter the object. An 8 is pretty bright en.wikipedia.org... for comparison sake Sirius is the brightest star in the sky and it's a -1 of magnitude. This event should have no impact on us physically it's just real cool for amateur astronomers.



lol. It amuses me sometimes how extensive knowledge of a subject can often lead to huge blind-spots when attempting to communicate way laymen.

I'm sure most of us understand what a nova is. What the question above this post was trying to say, is that your entire first post is very cryptic for someone who hasn't made a fairly serious study of your topic. I did not even see a clearly identifiable sentence (as I understand them) beyond the part where you mention your desire to post this quickly. Just what looked like a bunch of random data -- data that is probably meaningless without expertise.

The person above was, I believe, asking for at least a rough translation. Maybe "possible nova at x" is about as detailed as it got.



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 02:07 AM
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I remember reading almost 2 years ago now, that Betelgeuse was going NOVA, though they weren't sure when the light was going to reach us. As I recall, the article stated that when the light did finally reach us, the light was going to be incredible. Far brighter than the full moon if I recall correctly (remamber, it was a long time ago I read this). The article may have been exagerating, but I thought it said that at night, it would be lit up here on the surface almost like it was daytime. I remember people here commenting on that saying if it were true, many people would believe it to be the end of the world.

I'll be interested to see just how bright it gets. I hope there are no negative effects on us from the gamma ray burst.



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 02:09 AM
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reply to post by adept2u
 


Thanks for the Headsup.. IS there any other picture apart from the one you posted? Just want to see how colourfull the event is. If Nova happens are we able to see with naked eye?

S&F for you



posted on Oct, 3 2012 @ 03:41 AM
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Our Sun will eventually die (like everything else), but it will not explode. It does not have enough mass.





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