Deadly New Virus Uncovered In Africa

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posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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Deadly New Virus Uncovered In Africa


www.medicalnewstoday.com

...Genetically, BASV bears more resemblance to rabies viruses, which cause a different type of infection, a neurological illness that can take months to develop but invariably kills, explains Chiu. The virus belongs, like rabies, to a family called the rhabdoviruses...."it is very different from any other rhabdovirus," write the authors. No other rhabdovirus is known to cause the acute, rapid and deadly hemorrhagic fever...
(visit the link for the full news article)


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posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:15 PM
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A new virus has been found which combines characteristics of rabies and hemorrhagic fever.

In my non-professional opinion, this seems to be a particularly deadly and nightmarish combination. As some may know, hemmorahgic fevers cause the victim to "bleed out", often from every pore. Meanwhile rabies...well, most of us know what rabies is. Ponder the possibilities.

One of the biggest causes for concern is that the virus can simmer in the victim's bodies for months or even years before showing any symptoms. Then suddenly, the victim experiences a horrific episode, by which time it is too late to do anything, followed by death. This means the disease could spread rapidly while giving the illusion that nothing at all is wrong...then suddenly...

Keep your eye on this one.

www.medicalnewstoday.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 10/1/2012 by silent thunder because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:24 PM
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Yay.
We may already have it and not even know it.



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:27 PM
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Wow, that's a really scary combination and to think that you can go without symptoms and then all of a sudden it happens...

Thanks for posting on it.



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Now I suspect there will be a rush to see who can develop it into a extremely transmissible virus like was the case for the Dutch and the Bird Flu .



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:34 PM
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searched cdc and who and got nothing on this. To early for them or........



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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That combo kinda makes it sound like the rage virus. I can imagine it now Africans suddenly very aggressive and have blood pouring out of them if it evolves who knows. Zombie attack round what is it now 2 or 3 lol.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 06:36 AM
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Enough with the damn zombies already.....................jeebus!
This virus is indigenous to Afrixa.....not likely to apear here....
The hemorragic part kills in three days you wont be biting anyone if you have it,,,,,
Its not a real danger and hardly worth a headline, but s&F for the effort



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by stirling
 


Buddy calm down the zombie part was a joke. Your right it kills in three days but if its close to the rabies virus it could cause aggravation and aggression and in the late stages of something like that when a person is delirous from sickness adding that on top if you were attacked what would the attacker do. No not bite possible get on top of you and beat the living crap out of you o wait there puking up blood it got in your mouth.... rage virus smart one not real zombies.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 07:44 AM
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It ain't the first and certainly won't be the last virus in Africa. The place is a breeding ground for anything and everything.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 09:00 AM
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This is bad news. The laundry list of death is getting longer and longer. The onset being delayed makes it sound like HIV also, I wonder if this and HIV are part of a new family of virus that bides it's time so to speak. Killing the host outright is counterproductive so if you can stealth spread, much the better. 'shudders'



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by darknull
That combo kinda makes it sound like the rage virus. I can imagine it now Africans suddenly very aggressive and have blood pouring out of them if it evolves who knows. Zombie attack round what is it now 2 or 3 lol.


I'm with you on this one darknull....................sounds potentially similar to the 'manufactured virus' in the film 28 days later (then 28 weeks later and soon 28 months later i guess).....

A particulary scary concept of a film which although not a horror fright fest to watch.. the story itself is pretty frighting if it ever translated into reality.......

That is why I have moved to an island and have big angry dobermans patrolling where i am.......

PDUK



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 09:20 AM
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reply to post by stirling
 


...But if it infects you and lies dormant while amassing a viral load, like rabies as is states, then it isn't like Ebola or Lassa. I definitely think it's worth a headline. You might bleed out in three days, but it appears with this one you may be able to spread it for months before the final stages.

It's actually a nightmare virus, if everything said is true. The reason Ebola is hard to spread is because it kills so quickly the infected usually burns out before they can spread it. That wouldn't be the case if this virus is all that it's said to be.
edit on 2-10-2012 by GogoVicMorrow because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 09:30 AM
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reply to post by PurpleDog UK
 


As much as monay people may scoff at the "zombie" theory, the point remains that within scientific circles, the combination of the rabies virus with another that makes it more transmittable, would produce a "zombie" like scenario. one chemist specified a combination with the flu virus could have such effect. However a combination with hemorrhagic fever at this point may kill the person too quickly before the madness of the rabies makes them get aggressive to zombie proportions, however the blood secretion will make it more likely to spread through contamination to people trying to help.

So at the moment about a 5/10 on the zombie apocalypse scale, but due to the long term incubation period, this is definitely spreadable to other parts of the world quite quickly without people realizing. However, the contamination and containment of this at the moment seems quite simple. and with the spead of death following the outbreak, it seems unlikely to be accidentally contagious.

however this depends on the possible types of contamination, I.e. bites, or fluid transfer, rather than picking up the virus from sneezes etc.

if the latter happens to be true, or if it becomes air bourne, we have problems.
edit on 2/10/2012 by JakiusFogg because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 10:27 AM
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Thanks for bringing this to our attention OP.

S&F

Rev



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 01:21 PM
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Bloody and insane....like zombies.....



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 04:27 PM
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reply to post by silent thunder
 


Lets hope this stays where it is (sorry to Africa) but we cant have this getting out!!

Just hope it didnt travel here with anyone who came over to the Olympics!!



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:13 PM
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I’m surprised this is just now coming to light since the victims contracted the illness in the summer of 2009, three years ago. As horrible as the disease is, it doesn’t appear that it’s a threat coming near any time soon. The two students went to the same school and the only survivor was a nurse who took care of the second victim. SnF op for bringing this to light.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:14 PM
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double post
edit on 7-10-2012 by Gridrebel because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 07:35 PM
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reply to post by iwontrun
 


Here is the research article qn BASV

Based on our findings, some speculations on the origin of and routes of transmission for BASV can be made. All 3 patients became ill with acute hemorrhagic fever over a 3-week period within the same 2500-m2 area of Mangala village, suggesting that all 3 cases were infected with the same pathogen. Waterborne or airborne transmission would be expected to result in more numerous cases than the 3 reported. There were no reports of animal die-offs that would suggest potential exposures to infected wild animals or livestock. Taken together, these observations suggest that an unknown arthropod vector could be a plausible source of infection by BASV.

Although we cannot exclude the possibility of independent arthropod-borne transmission events, our epidemiologic and serologic data do suggest the potential for limited human-to-human transmission of BASV. Patient 3, a nurse, had directly taken care of Patients 1 and 2 at the health center, and another nurse (Contact 5), who had taken care of Patient 3 (but not Patients 1 or 2) had serologic evidence of asymptomatic BASV infection. We present a hypothetical model for BASV transmission during the hemorrhagic fever outbreak in which the initial infection of two children in Mangala (Patients 1 and 2) was followed by successive human-to-human transmission events involving two healthcare workers (Patient 3 and Contact 5). This pattern of transmission from the community to health care workers is also commonly seen in association with outbreaks of Ebola and Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever






 
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