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Tip of the Day: Search Google, eBay, and even ATS with -query term to remove unwanted search results

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posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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I work in the Internet Technology field, and I am always trying to find ways that our society can save a few minutes everyday by changing something so simply. I am always telling people about Windows® shortcuts, and so on.

Tip:
The next time you search Google, eBay, or any (most) search boxes try search for something in this fashion:

Tool the band -wrench -auto mechanic

or search eBay for: jewelry -lab -simulated -russia
You can really save yourself a lot of money on eBay especially when you tell the search bar to automatically exclude certain phrases-like many diamonds are often simulated in Russia.

There are numerous Google search techniques which can be found here:
support.google.com...

Hope this tip saves you all some time and energy!




posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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reply to post by samlf3rd
 


Thanks for the tip. Working in IT I found Super+L to lock the computer to be very helpful.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 10:14 AM
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I thought everyone knew about Boolean searching. It's taught in most computer classes, going back to 1997 at least.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 10:29 AM
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Wow, great stuff. Thanks.

The link really helps.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by DaTroof
I thought everyone knew about Boolean searching. It's taught in most computer classes, going back to 1997 at least.


Well, yes, people who take computer classes may know about it. But having been in IT for some 30 years, I can tell you that most computer users don't take classes. Most of them learn how to use computers by borrowing the worst bad habits of the worker sitting next to them or across from them.

I'd compare it to the blind leading the blind, but that would be far too kind a description....



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 11:02 AM
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I thought about making a thread about the +querry.
But I will post here:

The +querry will enforce the word that follows in the search.
So if I search for "dog +white" all search results will contain the word white.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by samlf3rd
Tip:
The next time you search Google, eBay, or any (most) search boxes try search for something in this fashion:

Tool the band -wrench -auto mechanic


So you're saying if I search for:

ATS Computer Help -Autowrench

I will find the best solution to any computer problem? Sounds good.
edit on 30-9-2012 by Rumsfeldstiltskin because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 10:23 AM
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Originally posted by Socrato
reply to post by samlf3rd
 


Thanks for the tip. Working in IT I found Super+L to lock the computer to be very helpful.


Yes I love that too, and I try to get all our clients that are HIPAA or PCI but most of them are old women who complain and say "It takes so long to lock out and log in". I say "When a HIPAA or PCI compliancy officer walks through that door you will care."

Also many programs (I have found) don't like to be locked out. When you log back in I have seen many programs freeze. But I am sure they will make an update for that.......................




posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 10:24 AM
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Originally posted by StareDad
I thought about making a thread about the +querry.
But I will post here:

The +querry will enforce the word that follows in the search.
So if I search for "dog +white" all search results will contain the word white.


Yes that is another beneficial search term too. Nice.



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 03:45 PM
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Originally posted by samlf3rd
Tip:
The next time you search Google, eBay, or any (most) search boxes try search for something in this fashion:

Tool the band -wrench -auto mechanic

Tip 1: don't use irrelevant words, as Google will include them in the search. The above search would give better results if the "the" was removed.

Tip 2: remember that the "-" operator will apply only to the next word, so "-auto mechanic" will ignore "auto" but it will search for "mechanic".

Tip 3: more results doesn't mean better results.
edit on 1/10/2012 by ArMaP because: to add tip 3



posted on Oct, 1 2012 @ 09:49 PM
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Originally posted by DaTroof
I thought everyone knew about Boolean searching. It's taught in most computer classes, going back to 1997 at least.





In 1938 an MIT grad student, Claude Shannon, noticed that George's true/false logic system fit nicely with computer science's 0/1 binary bent. Thanks to Shannon, Boole's logic was discovered to be the most sensible way to sift through vast amounts of computer-based data and the Boolean search was born.

www.architect-on-duty.com...









 
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