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Amateur Astronomer Maps the Surface of Ganymede

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posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:24 AM
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Technology has radically changed the contributions that amateurs can make to the field of astronomy. Using a readily-available 'hobby' telescope, off-the-shelf camera and computer equipment, plus experienced observing skills, Emmanuel I. Kardasis of the Hellenic Amateur Astronomy Association has produced the first amateur albedo map of Jupiter's moon Ganymede.

This demonstration has implications for the future role of amateur astronomers. The work will be presented at the European Planetary Science Congress in Madrid on Thursday 27th September.

[Edit for brevity. --DJW001]

To produce the images Kardasis attached a camera to his telescope and recorded a video of Ganymede. Selecting only the sharpest frames of the video allowed him to obtain a series of images when the atmospheric conditions - known as 'seeing' - were most favorable. These best images were then stacked and aligned, before being enhanced through photo-editing software.




www.spacedaily.com...

This is so exciting I just had to share. Other than being extremely cool, there are several points here that are relevant to ATS:

An amateur astronomer was able to map the surface of a moon in the outer Solar System. This means that anyone, anywhere, with the proper equipment, can do cutting edge science. This was not done by some government agency. No government on Earth can prevent private citizens from observing what is happening in space. If the Earth were being menaced by a rogue planet or brown dwarf star, people like Emmanuel Kardasis would know about it.

Mr. Kardasis used digital imaging equipment to obtain the data, then processed it to get the clearest images. This is standard procedure. Just because something has been run through photo-editing software does not mean it is "fake."




posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:49 AM
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Higher resolution picture:



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:06 AM
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Originally posted by grobi77
Higher resolution picture:


Thanks!



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:19 AM
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That's pretty interesting, maybe he can map our moon as its closer and see if there are any alien bases and while he's at it prove once and for all that Nasa went to the moon in 1969.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:24 AM
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Originally posted by kudegras
That's pretty interesting, maybe he can map our moon as its closer and see if there are any alien bases and while he's at it prove once and for all that Nasa went to the moon in 1969.


Both of your questions have already been answered. I just assume you don't like the answers.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:31 AM
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Interesting, he used a 11inch, possibly a Dobsonion or nice expensive refractors.

I can see a lot of things with my 8Inch Dob, even Saturn rings, Mars ice caps, Moon craters in nice detail, but can;t see smaller structures on moon like a "base".. but man... looking thru your telescope is totally different from a video.. when i saw the moon for the first time with my 8inch... i felt a cool sensation in me!



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:56 AM
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sorry but this topic is already being discussed here:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

please join the existing discussion and post your thoughts and opinions there
Thread closed.



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