Reverse aging? Scientists find way to make old muscles young again

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posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:57 AM
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Reverse aging? Scientists find way to make old muscles young again


www.foxnews.com

The key revolves around stem cells found within muscles. During exercise or injury, these stem cells become activated and work fervently by dividing and multiplying into new muscle fibers that help to repair the muscle. When they are no longer need, they retreat into a reservoir within the muscle and lay dormant until they are needed again.
The problem with aging muscles is that these ‘fixer’ stem cells don’t remain dormant when they’re not needed. Instead, they become activated more and more and unnecessarily divide and multiply – causing them to die at a faster rate. Since muscles
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:57 AM
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This could explain why I am still in good shape at my age.

I'm fairly active, actually hyper active still at 50...


And quite the klutz. I'm always hurting myself for some reason.

Could my klutziness be a part of keeping my body younger than my friends?

I mean, I look at them and think to my self. "Wow! You've aged." And they have remarked that other than the grey hair, I still look the same. Ugly...


www.foxnews.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 28-9-2012 by TDawgRex because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:01 AM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


I don't want to be knocking into things at 70 though. I know so many older people, that fall, break hips, or other bones, and a few weeks or months later, dead. Now if they can reverse aging in Bones, that would be a great accomplishment.


Still, this is good news also.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:09 AM
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reply to post by sonnny1
 


Check out the article, they address that very issue.

I have always believed that people allow pain to immobilize themselves thoughout life and it gets worst as we age.

I'm one of those idiots that tries to power through the pain...with little to no meds as well.

It seems to be working.

But I must admit...CRAP! It hurts!


But I always put on a good face.
edit on 28-9-2012 by TDawgRex because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:31 AM
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You probably just dont have enough pain yet...50 is kid stuff......you should be in great shape....its your friends that are suffering.....as far as pain goes, bud it ages sthe hell out of you.....
Id take the meds if it were up to me....pains a bummer man......Though id prefer not to.
These fixer upper cells could be transplanted from adult corpses could they?
next thing you know there will be a black market for them....and theyll be injecting them in everything from boobs to arseholes



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:50 AM
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Originally posted by stirling

These fixer upper cells could be transplanted from adult corpses could they?
next thing you know there will be a black market for them....and theyll be injecting them in everything from boobs to arseholes


Great...just flippin' great!

Decades of the Kardasions.


Ya had to go there didn't you?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:57 AM
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Not grasping something here - how do some people work out and look great well into their advanced years, if, as the article states, we only have a 'finite number' of these muscle stem cells? Jack LaLane worked out daily and looked great well into his 90's. I even made a post here a couple months ago about a black female bodybuilder who looked fantastic at age 70.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 02:16 AM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
Not grasping something here - how do some people work out and look great well into their advanced years, if, as the article states, we only have a 'finite number' of these muscle stem cells? Jack LaLane worked out daily and looked great well into his 90's. I even made a post here a couple months ago about a black female bodybuilder who looked fantastic at age 70.


I think that is the idea here.

Stay active.

When you strenuously work out, you are tearing down muscles. Injuring them so to speak, and they hence repair themselves.

As Sonny1 said, he (and I) has seen people injure themselves and die weeks to months later. I think that this is because the pain they endure makes them become sedentary, further worsening their health.

I'm thinking that if the stem cell treatment is used, it would be possible to help people "Power thru" the pain they feel.

But of course it still depends upon the individual.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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Despite the whole of this year having been dedicated to building a new house - actually massive remodelling on a rustic casita and new building on the lot - I have had a crew doing the heavy work so my part has been somewhat sedentary. Now for the past three weeks I have been occupying the new place but there has been a lot of finishing work to be done and I have encountered a couple aches and pains like a back tweak - very unusual for me - that annoyed me for a couple days despite temporary relief from stretching and bending to take a wrong step or lift something and have the ache return.

Three days ago I was forced to face the reality that I was feeling my age and lack of activity catch up with me as I get within a few months of turning 60. I needed to take some measures to restore a little vitality so I could waste it away with some online activity that has been occupying my time as of late. Three days ago I turned to the Five Tibetan Rites of Rejuvenation that I have been aware of for decades, had tried them, but never formed a regimen. Great news is that it works! This seems to fit well in your thread so is worthy of mention here.

Many are familiar with these Five Rites but like myself never gave them much consideration. Not "rituals" in some esoteric sense but five fairly simple exercises that most people can perform to some degree of correctness. The story behind them goes that an old and stooped former soldier walking with a cane was searching for rejuvenation and found a Tibetan monastery where he was taken in and introduced to these exercises and after a time became once again youthful - even to the extent his hair color came back dark once more.

In my three days of doing this now, immediately that back tweak went away, I have been sleeping full nights, my appetite is more normal and regular, and my ability to perform the exercises slowly and properly has been increasing. It should be noted that correct performance at first is less important if it exceeds your ability, only that you do your best and need only about three repetitions of the "rites" in the first few weeks, daily, until ability improves.

There is some controversy over how "authentic" these rites may be but there appears to be agreement they are authentic enough and do provide benefit. They are yogic in nature, following Tibetan tradition that they follow a flowing movement of yoga and not of the perhaps more common stationary type of yoga that is popularly known. An internet search of "five rites", "five tibetans", "rites of rejuvenation", or similar will yield more information than you really care to know and much more than necessary to achieve benefit including YouTube demonstrations of how they are performed. This Wiki link will provide a good departure point for anyone interested in learning more en.wikipedia.org...

For me it has just been a few days but I feel a big difference. A little exercise and activity applied to the right areas seems to get results like your post suggests. It takes less than five minutes to do these as of the moment I strain a bit even doing the minimum but I look forward each day after my first coffee and cigarette to doing these, quite cheerfully. No bowing to "sensei" or facing the east, none of those are even suggested, though I don't suppose it would harm in any way to do so if one is so inclined. Forget they are Tibetan "Rites" of questionable origen and just bear in mind they are a few simple exercises that will likely help keep you flexible if you are already healthy and vibrant, or if like me age suddenly creeps up on you it could be a way to send it packing and help restore some vigor and vitality. I offer a favorable vote for the routine. Can't hurt.

Thanks for the timely thread - timely for me. S&F!

Edit to add: A few days ago I was walking stooped because of that tweak - no injury, just muscle strain from hanging doors and standing in uncomfortable positions. I find myself this morning walking very erect, smiling, and energeticly jumping in to get a few things done on this house project between posts. It seems, like mentioned in the original book, the worse off you are when starting the more instantly you see improvement. It is working like that for me.

edit on 28-9-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


I wonder how much it's gonna cost?
Probably only the elite will be able to afford it.

Oh well



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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The law of thermodynamics will fight this idea every step of the way. To exist forever in one form is unnatural, because with all form of motion comes change. That's how the universe keeps the flow of energy in balance - by sending it one way or another, changing forms in order to keep the flow evenly distributed. In keeping one form forever, you are forcing energy to gather in one place, which can be dangerous if the time-space continuum of that area was not meant or designed for that kind of gathering. Similar to using a battery in the wrong device, the results can be destructive because neither the battery nor the device were designed for that combination.

See what I mean? It applies to biology as well - after all, what is biology but organic mechanics?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:11 AM
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It appears we may now have a choice between continual exercise our whole lives or getting these stem cells. Since the lazy solution is not yet available and maybe very costly when it is then for now it is all a matter of getting some exercise and I am sure a good diet helps too. Just like they have been telling us all our lives.

edit on 28-9-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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so basically, exercise is good, and being sedentary is bad.

great, something we've known for a really long time.
edit on 28-9-2012 by moniesisfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by moniesisfun
 


I just hit 22 today, and I still see no practical use for reverse aging as an immortality-based practice, and I see no legitimate reasons to indefinitely prolong the life of any human being.

The only possible rationalization is that they make the perfect leader, and I don't see how any leader would be willing to spend 500,000 years watching the rise and fall of a dozen different empires beneath their guiding hand. If anything, I should think that in itself would be more exhausting than simply leading a natural life - say, 80 years?

There is a certain merit to being able to die. After all, when you have forever, how do you fill that time? How do you deal with the crushing agony of watching everything you love fall apart despite everything you may do to maintain it - again, and again, and again, and again? Perhaps the psychological proessures would inevitably lead to the Darth Vader mindset, where you want to destroy everything because you're detest the act of life being born only to die.

And because you see the virtue of death, and begin to believe that life is actually evil in and of itself, because only in life do we experience pain and betrayal, deception and loss, everything we despise. And in death: nothing. No pain, no sorrow, no joy, no happiness, purely nonexistence. And when you live a thousand lifetimes filled with the same agonies and frustrations, life no longer holds the same meaning. It no longer holds the same appeal. Only when you see it through new eyes and no memory of what came before, when it's new all over again, does life hold the same meaning throughout the eons.

And that's why death is a blessing. ...Strange, isn't it? So many are over the hill and around the bend before they realize this, and I've got so many years ahead of me and I've already made peace with the End. It's saddening and uplifting at the same time.

I hope that all made sense to you guys. If not, you'll make sense of it eventually. It takes time, after all - but as with all things, you must be open to truths you may not be comfortable with. And if ever I am faced with a vote of whether to legalize immortality or not...

You can bet your bottom dollar I'll hit the "NO!" button.
edit on 28-9-2012 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by moniesisfun
 


I just hit 22 today, and I still see no practical use for reverse aging as an immortality-based practice, and I see no legitimate reasons to indefinitely prolong the life of any human being.


Cool. You can die. I'll live.


The only possible rationalization is that they make the perfect leader, and I don't see how any leader would be willing to spend 500,000 years watching the rise and fall of a dozen different empires beneath their guiding hand. If anything, I should think that in itself would be more exhausting than simply leading a natural life - say, 80 years?


Kid, history goes out the window as a marker for the future with this game changer. "human nature" as we currently know it will be non-existent.


There is a certain merit to being able to die. After all, when you have forever, how do you fill that time? How do you deal with the crushing agony of watching everything you love fall apart despite everything you may do to maintain it - again, and again, and again, and again? Perhaps the psychological proessures would inevitably lead to the Darth Vader mindset, where you want to destroy everything because you're detest the act of life being born only to die.


I have no clue what you're talking about here. You can die whenever you want. Just like you can live a long time if you like. You're that attached to "things"
Not my deal. Darth Vader? Really?? Yea, expanding our lifespan will lead to inevitable doom....oookay.


And because you see the virtue of death, and begin to believe that life is actually evil in and of itself, because only in life do we experience pain and betrayal, deception and loss, everything we despise. And in death: nothing. No pain, no sorrow, no joy, no happiness, purely nonexistence. And when you live a thousand lifetimes filled with the same agonies and frustrations, life no longer holds the same meaning. It no longer holds the same appeal. Only when you see it through new eyes and no memory of what came before, when it's new all over again, does life hold the same meaning throughout the eons.


It sounds like YOU have issues. I don't think time has any relevance to your issues.


And that's why death is a blessing. ...Strange, isn't it? So many are over the hill and around the bend before they realize this, and I've got so many years ahead of me and I've already made peace with the End. It's saddening and uplifting at the same time.


Well, suicide is certainly an option. Good luck!


I hope that all made sense to you guys. If not, you'll make sense of it eventually. It takes time, after all - but as with all things, you must be open to truths you may not be comfortable with. And if ever I am faced with a vote of whether to legalize immortality or not...


I guess you have serious ego issues. "you'll make sense of it eventually". How condescending! How about: I see the pathetic reasoning you present, and choose not to take in the foolish beliefs. Done.


You can bet your bottom dollar I'll hit the "NO!" button.


Awesome. I win!
edit on 28-9-2012 by moniesisfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by moniesisfun
 



Kid, history goes out the window as a marker for the future with this game changer. "human nature" as we currently know it will be non-existent.


That's Mr. Kid to you, although I do have a username if you decide you want to address me respectfully.

As for the human nature part - oh, I can believe it. For example, I should hope things will change when our lives are extended to the point that we can digitally memorize the last tree falling and the last smog-spewing factory put into operation, and we realize the hard way that we can't eat money - and that money doesn't buy everything, and immortality eventually takes the fun out of living. The reason I mention money is that when you have all the cash in the world, buying stuff gets old because the lack of challenge inherently decreases the glow of achievement.

Same principle applies immortality.


I have no clue what you're talking about here. You can die whenever you want. Just like you can live a long time if you like. You're that attached to "things" Not my deal. Darth Vader? Really?? Yea, expanding our lifespan will lead to inevitable doom....oookay.


If you had truly lived a life worthy of your condescending tone, you would understand that death is underrated. But from the sound of it, your ego is mostly fluff.


It sounds like YOU have issues. I don't think time has any relevance to your issues.



The temptation to jump from "prolonging lifespans" to "abolishing death" is too great for any self-respecting scientist to resist. I'm inclined to compare the risks to the atomic bomb - considering how easily we're killing everybody, why not make it more challenging by engineering a means to increase the biological endurance of the human being? "It seemed like a good idea at the time..." The prospect of playing "God" is too appealing to the ego of an ever-more-sophisticated scientific community, not to mention the recognition they would be bound to receive from highly beneficial endorsements on the part of certain government branches that would indubitably pay top dollar for such an advantage.

Because inevitably, this new development will be monopolized by the military (perhaps already has been) before we even get a good look at it. Any product with this much potential will be examined for applications in creating bigger and stronger weapons before any other branch has a chance to poke at it.

Am I supposed to support this? I don't think so. The detriments are far greater than the benefits, potentially, and you don't see it because all you can say is "More! I want more!"


Well, suicide is certainly an option. Good luck!



You call me "kid", but your responses don't really imply a more mature intellect.



I guess you have serious ego issues. "you'll make sense of it eventually". How condescending! How about: I see the pathetic reasoning you present, and choose not to take in the foolish beliefs. Done.


I'm condescending? Looking over your responses to my post - Hmm, look at all the snarky replies with little to no cause...Haha...we'll let forum decide on that one.


Awesome. I win!


I'll let you think you won. After all, I wasn't even aware of a competition in progress. If it means that much to you, who am I to burst your bubble?



edit on 28-9-2012 by AfterInfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:19 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by moniesisfun
 



Kid, history goes out the window as a marker for the future with this game changer. "human nature" as we currently know it will be non-existent.


That's Mr. Kid to you, although I do have a username if you decide you want to address me respectfully.


No thanks. Respect is earned. You haven't earned it.



As for the human nature part - oh, I can believe it. For example, I should hope things will change when our lives are extended to the point that we can digitally memorize the last tree falling and the last smog-spewing factory put into operation, and we realize the hard way that we can't eat money - and that money doesn't buy everything, and immortality eventually takes the fun out of living. The reason I mention money is that when you have all the cash in the world, buying stuff gets old because the lack of challenge inherently decreases the glow of achievement.

Same principle applies immortality.


What an incredibly limited mindset
The last tree...on earth
Do you realize how many "things" are out in the universe??

It's not money that is the problem, it's greed. Your principal is inapplicable. Again, the option exists to live a very long time. You can still jump off a cliff and end it, or get euthanized, or a wide variety of other options if you choose or are unfortunate.

As for the rest of your mindless assumptions, I'm just going to leave them be and enjoy my day.

Hope you get your issues worked out.




posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by moniesisfun
 



It's not money that is the problem, it's greed. Your principal is inapplicable. Again, the option exists to live a very long time. You can still jump off a cliff and end it, or get euthanized, or a wide variety of other options if you choose or are unfortunate.



And you think giving yourself more life than allotted by our Creator isn't greedy?



As for the rest of your mindless assumptions, I'm just going to leave them be and enjoy my day.

Hope you get your issues worked out.



I have less and less faith in the salvation of our species...



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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Originally posted by AfterInfinity
reply to post by moniesisfun
 



It's not money that is the problem, it's greed. Your principal is inapplicable. Again, the option exists to live a very long time. You can still jump off a cliff and end it, or get euthanized, or a wide variety of other options if you choose or are unfortunate.



And you think giving yourself more life than allotted by our Creator isn't greedy?


Erm, more mindless assumptions. First off: nobody knows if there's a creator or not. Second, this supposed creator gave us herbs to be used to make life awesome! He also gave us the ability to create fire, evolve, and use our brains to create awesome things which extend life for our species.



I have less and less faith in the salvation of our species...


Excellent! I have less and less faith in your ability to live a long healthy life with this perspective. Win for humanity!



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by AfterInfinity
 


It seems the earliest years of my life were the longest and most agonizing. Though they had their high points and some real thrills those type of experiences have continued throughout my life. I do recall specifically acknowledging that I made peace with the world when I was 23. We are all different and with different perceptions and experiences. All I am saying or suggesting is that you have a long way to go and perhaps the best yet to come so be ready for changes of perception and perspective. But you already know that. Best wishes.





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