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17 Seconds that will blow your mind!

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posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 12:02 PM
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reply to post by osirys
 


Wow!




posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 01:34 PM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy
...and by the way it doesn't particularly support the accretion theory of the solar system
edit on 29-9-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)

Could you please elaborate on this point?



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

you'd (or maybe it's just me) think the accretion disk would revolve parallel to the galactic plane and not perpendicular to it



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 02:04 PM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

you'd (or maybe it's just me) think the accretion disk would revolve parallel to the galactic plane and not perpendicular to it


First: as has been explained in this thread, the solar system is not at a 90 degree angle to the galactic plane. It's at a 60 degree angle. The video is wrong on that account I'm afraid.

Second: the accretion disk forms around the plane of the object such as the sun, and will do so around it's axis, not the galactic plane.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 02:30 PM
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We are on a ball that spins.
And circles around the sun.
The sun circles around the galaxy.
The galaxy moves around the Milky Way!
I don’t know if the milky way circles. But I would bet on it.

There is no way to find a stationary point in space.
And we can see things in space that are
Further away than the edge of the big bang.
From a tiny atom to galaxies, it all circles.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 03:37 PM
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Awesome. Thanks for bringing it.
So... the sun doesn't rise after all.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 05:15 PM
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Originally posted by jiggerj

Originally posted by abeverage
As an amateur astronomer i have never seen this

Consider my mind = blown!


Mine too! To the point where I have to ask, does it FEEL right to everyone? How can the sun bend space-time into a curve that all the planets are rolling around in, while moving through space in the way the clips shows us?


The sun is traveling through an arm of the Milky-way Galaxy, just never visualized it like that. It actually makes sense.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 

so then why is the Sun's axis parallel to the galactic plane? the axis should be perpendicular to the plane it accreted from no?

edit on 29-9-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 08:17 PM
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reply to post by osirys
 

I think you must search before you post this thread. Have seen him on youtube several times. Off topic, but thats where i know him from - I think the sun is a stargate, but the way he tells about it..



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 08:53 PM
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reply to post by Izak4K
 


I didnt see any link to this video before posting, but maybe it was titled something different.

Im not trying to promote the creator of this video, from what I hear, his science is kinda hokey.
But to be honest, I dont know anything about the guy. But judging by the comments about him in this thread...

I think the video itself is cool, even if its not technically accurate. Wether or not or not the creator is a trusted source, doesnt really matter to me.

I like the concept of the thing, and thats why I tried to warn people up front about the errors.
I think the message is more important then the details. But hey, thats just me.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

so then why is the Sun's axis parallel to the galactic plane? the axis should be perpendicular to the plane it accreted from no?

Good question. And what are other suns doing? Are we unique?
The Planet Uranus is tilted on its side perpendicular to the plane of the solar ecliptic. There are only theories how this might have come about. Heres a few.

io9.com...



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 06:50 AM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by eriktheawful
 

so then why is the Sun's axis parallel to the galactic plane? the axis should be perpendicular to the plane it accreted from no?

edit on 29-9-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)

1. The Sun's axis is not parallel to the galactic plane.
2. The accretion of the Solar System had nothing to do with the galactic plane. It exists in its own plane.

A solar system forms out of a cloud of gas and dust. This cloud starts collapsing due to its own gravity, and it also starts to spin due to many factors, such as irregularities in density or nearby supernova explosions. The direction of spin can be completely random, resulting in a plane that is set to any possible angle with relation to the plane of Milky Way.

Bottom line: the plane of the Solar System is independent of the galactic plane.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 07:55 AM
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Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

you'd (or maybe it's just me) think the accretion disk would revolve parallel to the galactic plane and not perpendicular to it

I don't see how the galactic plane would affect the accretion (at least not a lot, although I'm sure the overall gravitational effects of the galaxy do play at least some part).

There were probably so many other more localized (hence, stronger) gravitational effects taking place inside the nebula in which our protoplanetary disk formed. I could imagine that the pull of gravity from the other bodies (other stars?/other protoplanetary disks?) inside the stellar nursery from which we were formed would have had a greater impact on the orientation of our accretion disk rather than would the gravitational effects of the galactic plane.

Heck, our protolanetary disk may have been tilted by a passing massive star 5 billion years ago.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 12:39 PM
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edit on 30-9-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

you'd (or maybe it's just me) think the accretion disk would revolve parallel to the galactic plane and not perpendicular to it

I don't see how the galactic plane would affect the accretion (at least not a lot, although I'm sure the overall gravitational effects of the galaxy do play at least some part).
A few years ago I got curious about this and did a search. I never found a great source, but I did find a comment from an astrophysicist that the orientation of various star spins in the galaxy was more or less random. He sounded like he knew what he was talking about, and if he did, then indeed there's not much if any significant influence from the galactic plane.

However, I never found a peer-reviewed published paper stating this, so if anybody finds one, let me know.



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 01:42 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


This might be useful? adsabs.harvard.edu...
But one thing to remember is that systems form out of much smaller chunks of the Giant Molecular Clouds, and those chunks may change their rotation due to more local factors.
edit on 30-9-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 4 2012 @ 09:31 PM
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Originally posted by BagBing
reply to post by grubblesnert
 


IQ isn't a measure of intelligence. It's a measure of learning ability.
than why do I consistantly rate between 138 an 144 and still feel stoopid??



posted on Oct, 5 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People

Originally posted by bottleslingguy
reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 

you'd (or maybe it's just me) think the accretion disk would revolve parallel to the galactic plane and not perpendicular to it


I don't see how the galactic plane would affect the accretion (at least not a lot, although I'm sure the overall gravitational effects of the galaxy do play at least some part).
A few years ago I got curious about this and did a search. I never found a great source, but I did find a comment from an astrophysicist that the orientation of various star spins in the galaxy was more or less random. He sounded like he knew what he was talking about, and if he did, then indeed there's not much if any significant influence from the galactic plane.


This seems to make perfect sense, considering that the birth of our solar system came probably 7 or 8 billion years after the formation of the galaxy. I mean, we know there have been other stars that have lived and gone supernovae before our solar system began -- supernovae that gave rise to the stellar nursery in which our Sun was born.

Considering all of that, I can't see how the original spin/plane of the Galaxy could be maintained by our solar system, seeing that our solar system is at least a third generation star -- meaning that at least two generations of other stars lived and died and provided the material needed that gave rise to our solar system.


edit on 10/5/2012 by Soylent Green Is People because: formatting



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