It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

17 Seconds that will blow your mind!

page: 3
34
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 02:27 PM
link   

Originally posted by Sly1one
in a 2d view (from the side) its a "wave"...in a 3d/4d view (from side) its a helix. This was NEVER taught to me in school and I'm pretty upset that it wasn't...
You were never taught about the sun being a star in the Milky way galaxy, and that the milky way spins around? Are you sure?

Is it possible you were taught about that, and you were daydreaming that day, and that's why you don't remember it?? I find it hard to believe anyone gets out of school without learning about the Milky Way galaxy.




posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 03:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by Sly1one
in a 2d view (from the side) its a "wave"...in a 3d/4d view (from side) its a helix. This was NEVER taught to me in school and I'm pretty upset that it wasn't...
You were never taught about the sun being a star in the Milky way galaxy, and that the milky way spins around? Are you sure?

Is it possible you were taught about that, and you were daydreaming that day, and that's why you don't remember it?? I find it hard to believe anyone gets out of school without learning about the Milky Way galaxy.


I learned about the milky way but it was touched upon very...lazily and didn't delve into much more than a phenomenal cluster of stars circling a drain...I could have been daydreaming I'm not sure but I knew the heliocentric model....I guess I just got unlucky and happened to day dream when they went over the true path of earth's orbit...

Regardless this isn't the first time for me to see the true path of earth I've actually know about it for quite a while but I didn't learn about it in school...We didn't have a lot of classes about space though...



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 04:43 PM
link   
reply to post by Sly1one
 

I don't recall if I was ever specifically taught the Earth's path was a distorted helix. However, if we know the earth orbits the sun which I was taught, and we know the the sun is moving as the Milky Way rotates, which I was also taught, well, isn't figuring out the (distorted) helical path of the Earth a bit like adding 2+2?

That's how I look at it anyway.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 04:52 PM
link   

Originally posted by abeverage
As an amateur astronomer i have never seen this

Consider my mind = blown!


Mine too! To the point where I have to ask, does it FEEL right to everyone? How can the sun bend space-time into a curve that all the planets are rolling around in, while moving through space in the way the clips shows us?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:08 PM
link   

Originally posted by skepticconwatcher
reply to post by osirys
 


Looks kind of like a DNA strand no ?

Very awesome.

It does and I never knew that's how the solar system moved.

It's a cool video but I would prefer it to be slowed down.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 05:10 PM
link   
Wouldn't this be obvious with all the satelites we have in orbit? Why isn't this proven?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:16 PM
link   

Originally posted by trollz
Uh... I'm kindof confused here. What exactly about this was amazing? Did people not know that planets revolve around the sun or that they're all moving in space? I thought this was common knowledge.
Your signature states: "142 IQ COME AT ME BRO". Yet you fail to comprehend simple human behavior when it comes to people's reaction to the OPs video........

142 IQ isnt working to well for you, bro

edit on 28-9-2012 by grubblesnert because: spelling

edit on 28-9-2012 by grubblesnert because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-9-2012 by grubblesnert because: little sumthin'



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 06:39 PM
link   
reply to post by grubblesnert
 


IQ isn't a measure of intelligence. It's a measure of learning ability.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 07:15 PM
link   
reply to post by BagBing
 


and the difference is



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:00 PM
link   
I have always tried to visualize the movement of the planets through space in my mind. This video does that wonderfully. Imagine this on a grander scale! It would be cool if the video also showed the sun orbiting the center of the galaxy and our galaxy orbiting another, larger galaxy along with the galaxies "close" to us and....you get it. Now THAT would be a crazy visual!



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:17 PM
link   
reply to post by nunya13
 



It would be. If I had the skills and time, I would make that video myself. But alas I do not. Perhaps in another life



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:28 PM
link   
reply to post by violet
 


Here is another video that shows the orbits slower.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:41 PM
link   

Originally posted by Arbitrageur
reply to post by Sly1one
 

I don't recall if I was ever specifically taught the Earth's path was a distorted helix. However, if we know the earth orbits the sun which I was taught, and we know the the sun is moving as the Milky Way rotates, which I was also taught, well, isn't figuring out the (distorted) helical path of the Earth a bit like adding 2+2?

That's how I look at it anyway.


You are right, it is essentially taking to models and figuring out the rest and it is implied...I don't know I guess I just wish it was a more utilized model to describe how the earth paths through space...

What I would like to really see is the pathing of the galaxy have they actually figured out what the galaxy is orbiting? if anything? I figured it would be the Hydra cluster that they would use as reference but in the grand scheme of everything which direction are we moving? Is there a speed/direction/point in space by which you are completely "stationary" in relation to everything else?

If two cars were parked next to each other and there was NO background reference with a completely black backdrop...how would you tell who was really moving? You or the other car? or both?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 10:21 PM
link   
reply to post by Sly1one
 


It's called Redshift. Astronomers are able to use the difference in frequency of the light to determine exactly what your are asking (your example of the 2 cars, etc).

As for the Milky Way galaxy, and what does it orbit? It actually does not really obit anything, but is moving through space, along with other galaxies in the Local Group that it belongs to. Here is some information about that:


Astronomers believe the Milky Way is moving at approximately 630 km per second relative to the average velocity of galaxies taken over a large enough volume so that the expansion of the Universe dominates over local, random motions: the local co-moving frame of reference that moves with the Hubble flow.[100][further explanation needed] The Milky Way is moving in the general direction of the Great Attractor and other galaxy clusters, including the Shapley supercluster, behind it.[101] The Local Group (a cluster of gravitationally bound galaxies containing, among others, the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy) is part of a supercluster called the Local Supercluster, centered near the Virgo Cluster: although they are moving away from each other at 967 km/s as part of the Hubble flow, this velocity is less than would be expected given the 16.8 million pc distance due to the gravitational attraction between the Local Group and the Virgo Cluster.[102]


source



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 05:16 AM
link   
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


On a more local scale, The Milky Way and the Andromeda are moving towards each other due to gravity. They are basivcally falling towards each other. If the Andromeda was destined to miss us by a great deal, we and it would end up orbiting around a common centre of mass. Latest calculations show that it will hit us head-on.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 05:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by Sly1one
Is there a speed/direction/point in space by which you are completely "stationary" in relation to everything else?
There is a reference frame called the CMB (cosmic microwave background). I don't know of anything that's motionless with respect to that, but we can express the relative motion of everything with respect to that.

The milky way is moving 552 km/s wrt (with respect to) the CMB, while the Earth is only moving about 360 km/s wrt the CMB. (New York to LA in 12 seconds at 360 km/s!)

What this suggests is that we are on the side of the milky way that is spinning backwards compared to the motion of the center of the Milky Way. In the distant future when our solar system has made half a revolution in the Milky way, presumably our speed will be something like 744 km/s wrt the CMB.



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 07:05 AM
link   
OMG we are all spinning sideways, we are all gonna fall off ! LOL

Er.. How do they know the orientation? Why go sideways? Why not go up or down depending on your perspective in space?



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 08:30 AM
link   
reply to post by osirys
 


are we really moving around the sun perpendicular to the galactic plane? I thought we were moving parallel to it, is that actually wrong?

and by the way it doesn't particularly support the accretion theory of the solar system
edit on 29-9-2012 by bottleslingguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 10:13 AM
link   
reply to post by osirys
 


I saw this just a couple of days ago and my mind is still blown. Glad you posted it here as I think it is an important realization and could have the same effect as discovering that the earth is not flat. Seriously, it has the potential to combine and inspire scientist in connecting the universe with the human condition by DNA measurement which I will bet now has the same structures as the orbits you are pointing out. Mind you they have to look at it in small ways and we are a long way away from this, but the potential is there. All-is- One. Is this proof?

Thanks for the great post, Paul



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 11:48 AM
link   
reply to post by BewilderedandAmused
 


Thanks, I had kinda a similar thought about it. Its a simple concept that everybody knows, but I feel like seeing it visualized might inspire somebody somewhere.



new topics

top topics



 
34
<< 1  2    4 >>

log in

join