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Midwest Tornado in September

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posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:07 PM
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Really seems to be an active night for weather. East of St. Louis, Mo reporting Tornado in the area. What's with that I thought the tornado season should be about over. Here they are having severe thunderstorms at 69 degree temperatures and tornadoes with multiple funnels. Really really strange night.

The Weather Channel


www.weather.com...




posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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Not out of the ordinary. As summer turns to fall you get the same mixes of cold dry air from the north and warm moist air from the gulf. It's not as intense or extreme as the in the springs. In Oklahoma we tend to call it the "mini storm" season. Got some pretty good storms going over us right now actually. Lots of lightening and wind, no tornado's tonight though.

I remember in the early 90's a tornado hit Tulsa in late December....



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:15 PM
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reply to post by SrWingCommander
 


Thanks for the info, where I'm at we usually don't get severe thunderstorms until it gets around 85 to 90 degrees. That must be disconcerting to say the least.. I know Oklahoma, has more then enough tornadoes in the Summer. Do you recognize the signs of a pending tornado if your not around a TV or radio?
edit on 25-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: add

edit on 25-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 07:51 AM
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Tornadoes are weird in the Midwest. I swear, they could care less what time of year it is.


A few years back, I was at an Old Navy the first week of January. Tornado sirens went off and we had to take shelter in the dressing rooms. IN JANUARY!

Tornadoes can happen any month if the conditions are right.
edit on 26-9-2012 by tport17 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 10:32 AM
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Originally posted by 1loserel2
reply to post by SrWingCommander
 


Thanks for the info, where I'm at we usually don't get severe thunderstorms until it gets around 85 to 90 degrees. That must be disconcerting to say the least.. I know Oklahoma, has more then enough tornadoes in the Summer. Do you recognize the signs of a pending tornado if your not around a TV or radio?
edit on 25-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: add

edit on 25-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: (no reason given)


Generally. I have lived here for 34 of my 39 years.......And while I am not a meterologist, I took a couple of courses in it in high school and college, was a student pilot and Civil Air Patrol cadet, and an instructor/manager for the US Space Camp/Aviation Challenge program, all requiring that I studied weather pretty closely for a weather "layman".

Not to mention, the conditions that are required for tornado formation are much more understood than say, 15 years ago. So we get a general, "could be a rough day tomorrow, good chance of Tornado formation" usually the night before on the news. Since the National Severe Storms Labratory is in Norman, Oklahoma on the OU campus, they work with the local news trialing alot of the newer technology on storm forecasting. Almost all of our TV weather people are "real" meterologists (ie they have degrees in meterology or other hard sciences and are American Meterologival Socitey credentialled), not someone just reading a report. If you grow up here there is plenty of "tornado talk" at school, drills and stuff. You get pretty used to it and if you have paid attention, pretty adept at understanding it.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by 1loserel2
Really seems to be an active night for weather. East of St. Louis, Mo reporting Tornado in the area. What's with that I thought the tornado season should be about over. Here they are having severe thunderstorms at 69 degree temperatures and tornadoes with multiple funnels. Really really strange night.

The Weather Channel


www.weather.com...
















yeah , not to strange at all. Tornado alley actually shifts with the seasons(Spring,Summer,Fall).
All though its rare we can get tornados in the winter too.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by tport17
 


I guess you're right and I just never paid attention before now, maybe I'm a bit more tuned in now. Who knows? Now that other thing that can come up I never heard of before either a derecho, sounds like they can be as nasty as a tornado. Wouldn't want to mess with either of them.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by SrWingCommander
 


I'm from the Midwest not OK though I do remember the tornado drills as a kid. I also remember when the stations had just someone reading the local weather. I never thought about it much as a kid, guess at that age you don't think about something that could kill you.
I did take an Introduction to Meteorology taught by a local meteorologist and was pretty good with it, but am a mathematically challenged person, even though Science interested me
I would wager being a pilot you would really have to know more than just what I learned from the meteorologist, Wasn't his fault though can't exp;ect to learn too much out of an Introduction course, I guess.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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Check TorCon daily around noon you will see that active weather is going to remain persistant into the fall. In BC were supposed to have a crzy winter supposedly, but if your a person living in the midwest I'd say TorCon would be a site you have hot linked already.

If not here it is red shows areas of concern orange yellow at risk but updates often be safe people

TorCon

SaneThinking



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by 1loserel2
 


I wanted desperately to study meteorology but I just cannot get into the math aspect of it all. So, my husband, brother, and I have a storm chasing team instead. I've done a lot of self-teaching online and in books and tried to rely on the math parts to be done by others.

And I agree with the torcon website, I view it multiple times a day in the spring. As well as SPC. They seem to be getting better and better with long-term warnings. For example, last April, the SPC issued a severe warning for tornadic storms days ahead of time and that day ended up being very active.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 12:23 PM
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reply to post by 1loserel2
 


Glad you posted this, it was a weird night I just couldn't wake up during this really intense storm last night and usually I am on guard when it is dangerous. I guess the storms that drenched and went over us got even worse to the east.

It is never rare to see tornadoes in mo at any time of year, we do have a more typical time or two of year but I have seen tornadoes in thunderstorm, ice and snow.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by SaneThinking
 


Thanks for the link, have bookmarked it and will check it out at noon.



posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by antar
 


Glad to have helped tornadoes are dangerous phenomenon most definately.

Just two weeks ago we had a strange night, alot of lightening and thunder for the whole evening, but no rain. What's up with that I wonder?



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by tport17
 


You were just fortunate you were inside, I always feel sorry for anyone who might be driving or worse walking in a bad weather situation. It could've been worse. Glad to hear Old Navy's dressing rooms are safe during a severe weather outbreak, sure wouldn't want to be in someplace where it wasn't.



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 01:05 PM
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reply to post by tport17
 


How cool is that?


I know too bad about the math Oh, well we can always live vicareously right. I really liked Science, also liked History.(the older the better Egyptians, Greeks,Romans Etc, even Dinosaurs. Hated math with a passion.

I do from time to time look in on the storm chasers show on TWC. All though you really have to be very careful how you approach a storm. We have a chief meteorologist here at local tv station who was once a storm chaser. So you're following in the right direction even if you can't be a meteorologist.

Be safe out there.



edit on 28-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: add



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 04:18 PM
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For all those interested in daily waether and the going ons around the world in a quick newscast I would suggest this YT channel. Guy does a quick overview of what has happened and what could happen in the next little bit with our weather and quakes, and flares and such....

SuspiciousObserver 2Min news

Subscribe it's worth it. Quick, concise, and too the point for all those living in tornado alley, and around the world


SaneThinking




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