What if we hit a giant blob of water???

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posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:46 PM
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I have been thinking about all the hazards out there in outer space and all the objects that we could potentially run into. We could hit other planets, comets, meteors, and other things. So I was wondering what would happen if one day we get the word that we are going to fly through a giant blob of water, lets say the size of mars. What would happen to the world. Would the water vaporize and burn up in our atmosphere or would it be like a giant rain drop just drenching us. I think a big blob of water would cause havoc on our planet and cause a ton of damage. What do you guys think?




posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:49 PM
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Reply to post by lspilot6946
 


I'm assuming that some would evaporate in our atmosphere, but basically that would be a tiny amount. If we hit a blob of water (if that's possible, would there be any gravity to hold the water together in a blob?) the size of Mars, then we'd all drown.


 
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posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:51 PM
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i think eventually it would turn into some kinda cloud ...



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:53 PM
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reply to post by domasio
 


Would not be as much fun as colliding with a big gas of alcohol.

Yes they do exist.

www.labnews.co.uk...



Btw there can not exist liquid water in space. It would evaporate/freeze. So you are talking about colliding with a giant ball of ice.
edit on 25-9-2012 by alphaskunk because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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reply to post by domasio
 





then we'd all drown.


No bells go'in off anywhere ? Nothin ?



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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You mean ice cube since it would be frozen in space? It would leave a mark for sure.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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Uh yeah, we'd be toast if we ran into a big blob of water, the Earth would probably be shattered. We're traveling 66 thousand mph around the sun, and our solar system is moving at 500,000 mph, hitting a blob of water that fast would be ridiculous. Thankfully the distance between objects in space are pretty vast, so the odds of us running into something are really tiny (aside from objects within our solar system obviously).



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 09:58 PM
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reply to post by alphaskunk
 


What about a giant blob of Scotch:w:?
I don't know about you guys, but I think I wouldn't mind that so much.

Anyway, I think we would all be boiled rather quickly. Anything not boiled would get drowned. Aquatic creatures would inherit the Earth.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:04 PM
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reply to post by lspilot6946
 


A blob of water could not exist the size of Mars. The internal pressure would obviously cause water near the center to boil, creating a massive steam explosion that would turn into a super bomb. Also, a blob of water that had not yet exploded would have to be in the same general orbit of Earth to stay liquid on it's surface. Getting hit with an ice ball that big, would destroy the planet as if it was Mars itself that hit us.

Even if there was a blob of liquid water that big hitting the Earth, speed would be an important factor, but at cosmic velocity...... My guess is that it would peel the planet like an orange exposing it down to the mantle.

Interesting cataclysm indeed.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by watchitburn
 





Aquatic creatures would inherit the Earth.



Aqua man, Aqua lung, Aquamadenajad.
edit on 25-9-2012 by randyvs because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:08 PM
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I'm thinking outside the box on this one but I'm not sure that we wouldn't explode. How you ask? Well it depends on the salinity of this water cloud and it's interaction with the Earth. This water could separate into hydrogen and oxygen if it has enough salinity as it could interact with electricity from lightning as it enters our atmosphere.

This is only if somehow the water was broken down into it's key elements oxygen and hydrogen which are highly flammable and also if the water could somehow still stay a liquid in a near vacuum.
edit on 25-9-2012 by TheLieWeLive because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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Ok let see where to start first? Hhmmm.....

1) water is very heavy, meaning it has "mass", mass is the exact same thing as gravity, so yes it would would itself together just like any ice bal "comet" or planet.
2) water can't boil if under pressure, so no, it would not "explode", this is quite silly actually. Why do you think water isn't "exploding" under the ocean around open volcanic vents? Pressure will not allow it.
3) it would not evaporate and be difused in space, just like our water here n earth, "gravity" would hold it to the water ball. Except in the event, that it was solid water entirely, it would just be slowly blown away by the solar wind, just like what happened to mars' atmosphere. As there was no protective magnetic field to shield it.

Kinda fun thought experiment. I would think that we would all die before impact, as the tidal forces of 2 close high mass objects gravities began to pull eachother apart. The first sign would be earth quakes with even increasing intensity, as we got closer to the "water world", followed by many current and new volcanoes erupting all over the world, as it deformed from the gravity of the water wold. Tides would begin to grow bigger and bigger, and bigger until they eventually reached thousands of miles high, as or proximity to the water wold increased.

Finally, we would all be long dead before we ever hit it, although the earth would feal the hit, all forms of advanced life would never even see it get bigger than the moon before they all died off of natural geological activities, and global tidal activities, not to mention the tens of thousands of mile and houjr wind that would tear the top few miles off the crust every day.

So ya it would suck a lot for a short time, then we would all day, weeks or even months before impact.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 11:37 PM
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I think the Heliosphere would be the buffer we need. I could be wrong, but I think I'm fairly right.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 11:45 PM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

There would be no such thing as a “giant blob of water” in the sense which you're thinking of water. If you found a planet that is entirely made of water, as others have mentioned, much of it would in fact be ice. Besides this, the pressure generated on a mass of water that size would make it much denser and more solid then what you would think of as water in the traditional sense. Essentially it would be the same as being hit by a comet or any other celestial body, and you'd still have a massive release of energy during the collision. Not something you would want to experience in person.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by defcon5
The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

There would be no such thing as a “giant blob of water” in the sense which you're thinking of water. If you found a planet that is entirely made of water, as others have mentioned, much of it would in fact be ice. Besides this, the pressure generated on a mass of water that size would make it much denser and more solid then what you would think of as water in the traditional sense. Essentially it would be the same as being hit by a comet or any other celestial body, and you'd still have a massive release of energy during the collision. Not something you would want to experience in person.

As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.


Wouldn't it turn ino water vapor...? I could be way off... Most likely i am..



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by dayve
 

When it comes to asteroid impacts, I would have to assume that the reaction would be the same if a rocky body hit in a ocean, as it would be if a watery body hit on land. From what I have read, the water would “flash-boil”. Energy from the impact has to be released somehow, and would be through the standard ways; sound, light, heat, etc.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 01:40 AM
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reply to post by new_here
 


That atmosphere would not matter in any way at all, even the magnetic field that shields earth from radiation would do nothing.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 06:19 AM
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Reply to post by alphaskunk
 


Ahh of course, cannot seriously believe I forgot that detail


@randyvs - Huh?


 
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posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by inverslyproportional
reply to post by new_here
 


That atmosphere would not matter in any way at all, even the magnetic field that shields earth from radiation would do nothing.



I respectfully disagree with you here. I'm talking about the Heliosphere that engulfs the sun and all of the planets in our Solar System. It's like the Earth's Magnetosphere but is an extra buffer. Plus, the Sun is the 'leading edge' as our Solar System spirals thru the Milky Way-- the Solar System isn't going "side-ways" ...so I personally believe any water would boil/evaporate before it has a chance to reach the Earth.

Here's a neat (really short) vid showing this...



posted on Sep, 30 2012 @ 12:05 PM
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Assuming that blob is larger than Earth, not all of it would stay in our gravitational pull. But that's assuming it is humongous. A significant amount would stay and cover a ton of land. A lot of people would die by:
-Force of us hitting it
-Water pressure
-Drowning
-No habitable area to relocate to





 
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