Learn To Appreciate Life - The Mayonnaise Jar and Two Cups of Coffee

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posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 11:42 AM
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Originally posted by minettejo
I actually had a philosophy prof do this. I thought it was original....LOL

I enjoyed the demonstration then, and appreciated the reminder now.


same here, and it was several decades ago...but it was used as a model of perception, along with how we are able to communicate ideas and opinions, in a clear and understandable way.




posted on Sep, 27 2012 @ 04:14 PM
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I'm glad you all enjoyed this as much as I did



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by okyouwin
 


Clearly, you do not actually get it.

If you did, you wouldn't waste so much time making these unfortunate attempts at degradation and manipulation of the emotions of other humans.

The beauty of metaphor is that it can mean different things to different people, depending on their situation and life experiences.

Your life experiences are not the same as mine. Your cynicism is painfully out of place in this thread, because it doesn't actually have anything to do with the idea behind the OP.

Perhaps you will understand when that bitter taste in your mouth starts to become sweet.

Take care, okyouwin, I hope you someday find what you are looking for.
edit on 9/28/12 by ottobot because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 03:42 AM
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I love this analogy. It's a great way to illustrate priorities and how we value (or devalue) things in life.

I think the reason people take issue with such analogies sometimes is because there is an instinctive tendency to interpret them as saying, "If you appreciated what you had, you wouldn't be so miserable." People feel that it invalidates their feelings or the predicament they find themselves in in their own lives. While I don't believe that's the case here, people do use such analogies and otherwise positive messages to do precisely that frequently.

I think those who feel that way might say, "I do appreciate my golf balls, and I value them above everything in life. But they happen to be dirty, chipped, in some cases lost or broken, golf balls, and that makes me unhappy." That's a valid feeling and statement and shouldn't be dismissed in the name of "positivity" in my opinion.

But as I said, I love the analogy and the message behind it. So I will conclude by saying, tongue firmly in cheek, "I wish you all shiny, plentiful golf balls."
Peace.
edit on 9/29/2012 by AceWombat04 because: Grammatical errors



posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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Originally posted by AceWombat04

I think the reason people take issue with such analogies sometimes is because there is an instinctive tendency to interpret them as saying, "If you appreciated what you had, you wouldn't be so miserable." People feel that it invalidates their feelings or the predicament they find themselves in in their own lives. While I don't believe that's the case here, people do use such analogies and otherwise positive messages to do precisely that frequently.

This is true, but there is no need to try to hurt the feelings of others simply because you do not feel or experience the same sentiment. Everybody is different and everybody takes something different from such stories. It doesn't matter what type of understanding one comes to - positive or negative, the point of the message is that when we examine our lives in a critical manner, there is always room for improvement where priorities come in.



I think those who feel that way might say, "I do appreciate my golf balls, and I value them above everything in life. But they happen to be dirty, chipped, in some cases lost or broken, golf balls, and that makes me unhappy." That's a valid feeling and statement and shouldn't be dismissed in the name of "positivity" in my opinion.

This is definitely a truth.

I am at the point in my life where I am working on finding and polishing my neglected and wayward golf balls.




But as I said, I love the analogy and the message behind it. So I will conclude by saying, tongue firmly in cheek, "I wish you all shiny, plentiful golf balls."
Peace.




posted on Sep, 29 2012 @ 08:51 PM
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reply to post by ottobot
 


Oh, I agree. There's a never a reason to hurt anyone's feelings. At least not intentionally. I was just trying to foster understanding between those who take issue with the analogy and those who advocate it. I try too hard to be a diplomat sometimes lol.

Peace.





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