Hubble goes to the eXtreme to assemble the deepest ever view of the universe

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posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 04:42 PM
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the deepest yet view of the universe,



(Phys.org)—Like photographers assembling a portfolio of their best shots, astronomers have assembled a new, improved portrait of our deepest-ever view of the Universe. Called the eXtreme Deep Field, or XDF, the photo was assembled by combining ten years of NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope observations taken of a patch of sky within the original Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The XDF is a small fraction of the angular diameter of the full Moon.

Read more at: phys.org...


phys.org...


The Universe is 13.7 billion years old, and the XDF reveals galaxies that span back 13.2 billion years in time. Most of the galaxies in the XDF are seen when they were young, small, and growing, often violently as they collided and merged together. The early Universe was a time of dramatic birth for galaxies containing brilliant blue stars far brighter than our Sun. The light from those past events is just arriving at Earth now, and so the XDF is a time tunnel into the distant past when the Universe was just a fraction of its current age. The youngest galaxy found in the XDF existed just 450 million years after the Universe's birth in the Big Bang.

Read more at: phys.org...


450 million year old galaxies at 13.2 billion light years distence from 13.2 billion years into the past,


this stuff is always cool a deep feild exposure many shots overlayed to form pictures from the dawn of the universe, to see clearer pics than ever

xploder
edit on 25-9-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)
edit on 25-9-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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And more dots of light.

Cool...but would rather be getting a high tech telescope that was able to zoom in on planets in nearby stars verses spending all our time trying to see to the edge of infinity...

Not blasting it, just wanting a refocus...seeing potential life bearing planets a few light years away is far more interesting to me than seeing a galactic cluster 50 billion light years away sort of thing



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 04:50 PM
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Awesome Xplodr, great thread !

We are so lucky to be the only intelligent life
in this Universe. UFO's?.. please ..
Like that's possible.
edit on 25-9-2012 by sealing because: sp



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:00 PM
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reply to post by SaturnFX
 


remember the Hubble deep field pictures?
well this is a small peace of the field with much longer exposures to show even deeper into the universe,
and there are lots of galaxies brought into veiw, that were faint smudges when the original picture was released,

if your interested in planet hunting your going to use some very sharp telescopes


xploder
edit on 25-9-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Would like to see the higher res version of this photo. Anyone have one?

Thanks for the post, OP! Makes me feel so insignificant!



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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Really cool!

Too bad we can't put some of our super advanced spy satellites to better use exploring the universe.

I'm referring to that story a few months ago, where I think it was the NSA, realized they had a couple of Hubble class telescopes just sitting in storage for the last 20 years. Imagine what kind of gears those bastards have know


But I digress, this is awesome. Thanks for sharing.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by SaturnFX
And more dots of light.

Cool...but would rather be getting a high tech telescope that was able to zoom in on planets in nearby stars verses spending all our time trying to see to the edge of infinity...

Not blasting it, just wanting a refocus...seeing potential life bearing planets a few light years away is far more interesting to me than seeing a galactic cluster 50 billion light years away sort of thing


Hehe, you contradicted yourself...because it would be HIGHLY interesting to spot a galaxy in 50 bil LY distance, giving that the alleged age of the universe is only 15 something billions of years.

Ironically, this is SIMILAR to those last findings where they discovered fully developed spiral galaxies in a distance equal to an age of only 450 MILL (!) years...where before it was deemed entirely impossible that only after 450 M. years there would be a fully developed spiral galaxy. You see, looking at galaxies so far back "in the past" can reveal some astonishing things because it could overthrow our entire picture we have from the creation of the universe etc...so it IS extremely interesting from a scientific point of view!
edit on 25-9-2012 by flexy123 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:53 PM
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wtf is the point of that many galaxies? and we are just sitting in ONE.

it's really hard to conceive that for a billion light years outwards from me sitting on my computer chair there are just galaxies and empty space.

it's such an extreme illusion living on this planet. we never perceive this stuff from our rooms...
edit on 25-9-2012 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:00 PM
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Originally posted by flexy123

Originally posted by SaturnFX
And more dots of light.

Cool...but would rather be getting a high tech telescope that was able to zoom in on planets in nearby stars verses spending all our time trying to see to the edge of infinity...

Not blasting it, just wanting a refocus...seeing potential life bearing planets a few light years away is far more interesting to me than seeing a galactic cluster 50 billion light years away sort of thing


Hehe, you contradicted yourself...because it would be HIGHLY interesting to spot a galaxy in 50 bil LY distance, giving that the alleged age of the universe is only 15 something billions of years.


Well, I didn't contradict myself, but anyhow, I agree that it is intellectually interesting, and yes, my random 50 billion remark would be interesting also in regards to rewriting the age of the universe..but was just saying I think we would be better off with telescopes able to focus in on a canyon on a planet around alpha centuri, or better yet, a high resolution zoomable local planet telescope...that will effect us short term with potential benefits than seeing super duper far away that, though interesting, will give no greater benefits than just a bit more info on the universe we live in.

not saying both aspects can't be done mind you..but it always seems the true tech is pushing seeing farther into space verses clearer into neighbors.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by yourmaker
wtf is the point of that many galaxies? and we are just sitting in ONE.

it's really hard to conceive that for a billion light years outwards from me sitting on my computer chair there are just galaxies and empty space.

it's such an extreme illusion living on this planet. we never perceive this stuff from our rooms...
edit on 25-9-2012 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)


There is a guy named Jim, He lives on a proton that is spinning around a atom in your fingernail...on his proton world, they have a telescope that can see far, far away...seeing other atoms even as distant as your wrist.

And he wonders the same as you just wondered.



Infinately big also means infinately small.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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Originally posted by SaturnFX

Originally posted by yourmaker
wtf is the point of that many galaxies? and we are just sitting in ONE.

it's really hard to conceive that for a billion light years outwards from me sitting on my computer chair there are just galaxies and empty space.

it's such an extreme illusion living on this planet. we never perceive this stuff from our rooms...
edit on 25-9-2012 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)


There is a guy named Jim, He lives on a proton that is spinning around a atom in your fingernail...on his proton world, they have a telescope that can see far, far away...seeing other atoms even as distant as your wrist.

And he wonders the same as you just wondered.



Infinately big also means infinately small.


what if the entire universe, all galaxies themselves on a macroscopic level combine to make up one proton?

what would that make Jim's 'universe'?



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:06 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


450 million year-old galaxies? Not quite. They're galaxies from 450 million years after the Big Bang.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:08 PM
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Originally posted by CLPrime
reply to post by XPLodER
 


450 million year-old galaxies? Not quite. They're galaxies from 450 million years after the Big Bang.


could you please explain this a little further and try to keep it simple for me
does this mean that the galaxies are younger than 450 million years, or older?


star clp

xploder
edit on 25-9-2012 by XPLodER because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:10 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Those galaxies didn't form in the Big Bang. They likely formed many millions of years after the Big Bang, making them significantly less than 450 million years old.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:23 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Beautiful. I'd love to just free float out there (if I could) and just be amongst the stars. Great image, really makes you think "are we alone?" and "why does this all exist?".




posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 02:21 AM
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This has always confused me, picture in your head a circle, and halfway from the center to any edge there is a dot that represents earth, in what direction are they claiming to be looking? Towards the center? That would make sense to me as i imagine a galaxy closer to the center would be younger as opposed to a galaxy on the edge of the circle because then it would have had time to form properly, assuming this is based on the big bang theory.


It would also make sense to me for us to be looking towards the point of origin, i figure due to expansion light is forced to travel faster from the center than the earth does, we are seeing younger galaxies as that light passes us.

If however the universe is not expanding as fast as light moves, and scientists are looking outwards to the edge of the circle then it makes no sense to me why they are seeing younger galaxies at all, i would think the leading edge of any explosion contains the oldest material.



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Yet people still think that we're the special ones and the only life in the Universe.
edit on 26-9-2012 by Vandettas because: (no reason given)





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