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Our galaxy and the universe BLOWS MY MIND!

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posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:29 PM
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I don't expect to get any stars, flags or replies to this post, as it's elementary science (especially to those that frequent this forum), but nonetheless, it excited me, so I'd care to share


The scale and enormity of the "space" outside of planet earth is absolutely mind boggling, and it's taken me a bit of time and research to wrap my head around it, so I'll explain in a simple way that my brain understands - for nothing more than reinforcing the information in my own memory!



Firstly, the speed of light

Light travels at a speed of 186,000 miles. Per second. Light takes 1.5 second to reach the moon. We now have the speed of light in a simple form of context.



The size of our galaxy - the Milky Way

Our little slice of the Universe - the Milky Way, is a galaxy which is 100,000 light years across. Remembering that light takes 1.5 seconds to travel from our planet to the moon. That same particle of light would take over 100,000 years to travel from one end of the Milky Way to the other.

On top of this, the Milky Way holds 500,000,000,000 stars (yes, 500 billion stars) - remembering that star = sun.

It is estimated that there is at least 1 planet circling each star - and they have estimated (they being NASA etc), that there are over 10,000,000,000 (10 billion!) planets which circle in a zone which would classify them as habitable (as earth is).



Where does our Galaxy fit into things?

Remembering the size of our galaxy, and how man potential habitable planets it contains.

Now, here's the kicker - the "universe" houses over 120,000,000,000 (120 billion) galaxies.

I'll give that a second to sink in.

Our galaxy has around 10 billion potentially habitable planets. 10 billion x 120 billion = one of those weird 10 to the power of a trillion numbers.

Also, it would take that particle of light around 42 BILLION lightyears to travel the length of the universe.



How can anyone think we are alone?

If I could change anything in my life, it would be to go back to the start of school and study science - this is such amazing stuff.

Thanks for reading
edit on 24-9-2012 by ExCommando because: (no reason given)
edit on 24-9-2012 by ExCommando because: (no reason given)
edit on 24-9-2012 by ExCommando because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:32 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


You don't need any more stars, you already have a few trillion of them surrounding you.


A reminder of the big picture is never a wasted practice.
edit on 9/24/2012 by PatrickGarrow17 because: (no reason given)
edit on 9/24/2012 by PatrickGarrow17 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by PatrickGarrow17
reply to post by ExCommando
 


You don't need any more stars, you already have a few trillion of them surrounding you.
edit on 9/24/2012 by PatrickGarrow17 because: (no reason given)


Haha I love it.




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:36 PM
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I actually am giving you are star for this post because I believe that although it is "elementary science" there are some people on ATS that could benefit from reading this. It seems, some people, don't even understand this much.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by TheSparrowSings
I actually am giving you are star for this post because I believe that although it is "elementary science" there are some people on ATS that could benefit from reading this. It seems, some people, don't even understand this much.


I think most people understand that it's "big", but to know the actual numbers really puts it into perspective.

I also find it amazing the new ways they are sourcing to find habitable planets - by checking the variation in light emissions from the sun which is being circled, due to the change in gravitational pull (or wobble)

Amazing. I wish I could retrain in science!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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I'm with you man. I can't get enough physics, quantum mechanics, just science in general.

I wish I had put some effort into learning math, so I could have career in something to do with science.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:42 PM
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Originally posted by ExCommando

Originally posted by TheSparrowSings
I actually am giving you are star for this post because I believe that although it is "elementary science" there are some people on ATS that could benefit from reading this. It seems, some people, don't even understand this much.


I think most people understand that it's "big", but to know the actual numbers really puts it into perspective.

I also find it amazing the new ways they are sourcing to find habitable planets - by checking the variation in light emissions from the sun which is being circled, due to the change in gravitational pull (or wobble)

Amazing. I wish I could retrain in science!


Even knowing the numbers is pretty funny, as humans have no real way of reasoning numbers that large in size in any meaningful way.

I do agree though that given the numbers, the Earth cannot be the only one inhabited. To what degree is up for debate.
edit on 24-9-2012 by Daemonicon because: spelling



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:43 PM
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Originally posted by watchitburn
I'm with you man. I can't get enough physics, quantum mechanics, just science in general.

I wish I had put some effort into learning math, so I could have career in something to do with science.


I know - it sucks!

I've got such a passion for it.

But, ultimately, I think the passion is for the big picture stuff - I bet there is a load of really, really boring maths involved which would drive me insane.

I'll just keep looking at the photos, and reading the stuff I can understand - and pray that science finds a way to grant us the extended life span to one day visit other solar systems!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


Michael Faraday, one of the greatest scientists of the 19th century, didn't have any training or knowledge of higher mathematics. The British physicist was the first to model the energy fields surrounding planet Earth, which he did by drawing them in great detail.

As science is now taking on some topics that defy current mathematics and appear very vague by conventional expressions, I suspect some of the great scientists of the 21st century will be similar to Faraday as large scale theorists that express ideas visually.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:55 PM
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Originally posted by PatrickGarrow17
reply to post by ExCommando
 


Michael Faraday, one of the greatest scientists of the 19th century, didn't have any training or knowledge of higher mathematics. The British physicist was the first to model the energy fields surrounding planet Earth, which he did by drawing them in great detail.

As science is now taking on some topics that defy current mathematics and appear very vague by conventional expressions, I suspect some of the great scientists of the 21st century will be similar to Faraday as large scale theorists that express ideas visually.


So, theoretically speaking - if one is supremely interested in space, planets, suns, galaxies etc, and they have the next 5 years of pretty much free time, how would you suggest they go about pursuing this as an interest?



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:00 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


I feel your passion
the mere thought of it all is just breathtaking!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:13 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


Hmmmm good question. Something I'm trying to do, actually. I'd say read as much stuff as you can about cutting edge theory, try and get some type of picture in you mind about it. Be imaginative and try and find some original aspect to universal structure. Sounds like you're doing this type of stuff.

I don't know, really. I don't think generating epiphany can be easily taught. Obviously, having some mathematical knowledge doesn't hurt. But I think the major findings of science tend to me made in a creative/imaginative mode while the applications are more mathematical/logical.

It may be just as important to develop a mind working at full capacity as it is to learn scientific theory. I like to think having a wide range of interests and hobbies increases the likelihood that one will produce works of genius in any given field. There is something to be said for one topic obsession, though. Probably differs with each person, how to become a great thinker.
edit on 9/24/2012 by PatrickGarrow17 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


I have this for you.

As I look around this world it's easy to understand why people say, " There can be no God ". What I can not fathom, is how anyone can look into the cosmos and make the same claim.

Abraham Lincoln -

Of course we aren't alone. Nor are we the sharpest game in town. We are not the ultimate being.

Two penance.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by ExCommando
I don't expect to get any stars, flags or replies to this post, as it's elementary science (especially to those that frequent this forum), but nonetheless, it excited me, so I'd care to share


The scale and enormity of the "space" outside of planet earth is absolutely mind boggling, and it's taken me a bit of time and research to wrap my head around it, so I'll explain in a simple way that my brain understands - for nothing more than reinforcing the information in my own memory!



Firstly, the speed of light

Light travels at a speed of 186,000 miles. Per second. Light takes 1.5 second to reach the moon. We now have the speed of light in a simple form of context.



The size of our galaxy - the Milky Way

Our little slice of the Universe - the Milky Way, is a galaxy which is 100,000 light years across. Remembering that light takes 1.5 seconds to travel from our planet to the moon. That same particle of light would take over 100,000 years to travel from one end of the Milky Way to the other.

On top of this, the Milky Way holds 500,000,000,000 stars (yes, 500 billion stars) - remembering that star = sun.

It is estimated that there is at least 1 planet circling each star - and they have estimated (they being NASA etc), that there are over 10,000,000,000 (10 billion!) planets which circle in a zone which would classify them as habitable (as earth is).



Where does our Galaxy fit into things?

Remembering the size of our galaxy, and how man potential habitable planets it contains.

Now, here's the kicker - the "universe" houses over 120,000,000,000 (120 billion) galaxies.

I'll give that a second to sink in.

Our galaxy has around 10 billion potentially habitable planets. 10 billion x 120 billion = one of those weird 10 to the power of a trillion numbers.

Also, it would take that particle of light around 42 BILLION lightyears to travel the length of the universe.



How can anyone think we are alone?

If I could change anything in my life, it would be to go back to the start of school and study science - this is such amazing stuff.

Thanks for reading
edit on 24-9-2012 by ExCommando because: (no reason given)
edit on 24-9-2012 by ExCommando because: (no reason given)
edit on 24-9-2012 by ExCommando because: (no reason given)


I try to explain it this way. Close your eyes and picture one round white ping pong ball. That is not so hard to do. Now close your eyes and picture ten round white ping pong balls. Not so easy but still possible. Now picture 100 round white ping pong balls. Not so easy. The best way is to line the ten white ping pong balls in a row and to then imagine ten rows of ten white ping pong balls (10x10=100)... You might be able to use this method to visualize 1000 10,000 or even 100,000 ping pong balls if you really try... But few people can picture 1 million or 10 million or more. 10 trillion? wow... That is a lot. The universe is even more complex than ping pong balls. But the numbers are bigger than most minds can wrap around.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:33 PM
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Let me please blow your mind again ?


I've tried to explain how big it is before.
Actual size of the universe

A star size comparison ? Remember these are only from our galaxy alone.


The Known Universe by AMNH


He posts all kinds of stuff about the universe. Breathtaking material. Enjoy the link.
You tube channel ( spacerip )


You're in need of some time to watch all you can find, and where it can lead you.

You are welcome.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:36 PM
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Let me take the numbers presented by the OP and throw in Brian Greene's multi-universe theory!



Mind = Blown!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by Sinter Klaas
 


God damn one star minimum!

Love that first video - it's great seeing a visual guide.

Thank you !!!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by Ericthenewbie
Let me take the numbers presented by the OP and throw in Brian Greene's multi-universe theory!



Mind = Blown!


I read about this last night as well - confusing, but also amazing.

Wasn't he saying that due to the exponential growth at the "big bang", that there is the possibility of multiple universes.

Is he the one who is using cutting edge microwave (or is it radiation?) monitoring to try and see bulges in the edge of our perceivable universe - the result of universes impacting, such as when two bubbles hit each other?



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:40 PM
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reply to post by ExCommando
 


I share the same sentiment with you!

I'm just a measly primate trying to rationalize my existence in the immense vastness of the cosmos. Human life is so transient...if I could do it all over again, I would have followed my childhood dreams of becoming an astronaut; but, anthropology will have to suffice for now.

Whether or not other life exists in this universe is such a pertinent question with copious implications for our species.

Edit: I hope I'm alive and well to witness our first contact with an extraterrestrial species.
edit on 9/24/2012 by IEtherianSoul9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:43 PM
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Originally posted by IEtherianSoul9
reply to post by ExCommando
 


I share the same sentiment with you!

I'm just a measly primate trying to rationalize my existence in the immense vastness of the cosmos. Human life is so transient...if I could do it all over again, I would have followed my childhood dreams of becoming an astronaut; but, anthropology will have to suffice for now.

Whether or not other life exists in this universe is such a pertinent question with copious implications for our species.


I'm just amazed at how much information is out there if you just search!

I was reading about a comet which crashed in Australia back in the 80's - they found amino acids, as well as loads of other basic building blocks.

They said this could have been the start of life on earth - and if this is the case, then these "seeds" could easily have populated other habitable planets.

I just find it all so amazing!





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