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Be careful, she might hear you

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posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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Be careful, she might hear you


www.smh.com.au

AUSTRALIA'S security and law enforcement agencies are world leaders in telecommunications interception and data access and like most successful industries, they want more. Federal Attorney-General Nicola Roxon is canvassing a further expansion of surveillance powers, most controversially a requirement that telecommunications and internet service providers retain at least two years of data for access by government agencies.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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American federal and state judges issued only 1491 wiretap authorisations for law enforcement purposes in 2001. By 2011 the US figure had risen to 2732 warrants. Taking into account the difference in population between Australia and the US, the per capita rate of law enforcement telephone interception in Australia is 18 times greater than that in the US.



Australian law enforcement and government agencies are also accessing vast troves of phone and internet data without warrant. Indeed, they did so more than 250,000 times during criminal and revenue investigations in 2010-11. Comparative statistics suggest this is a far greater level of telecommunications data access than that undertaken in the US, Britain or Canada.

Data accessed includes phone and internet account information, outwards and inwards call details, internet access, and details of websites visited, though not the actual content of communications.



Telecommunications data now accessible without warrant also includes location data, which can be accessed both historically and in real time. Few Australians would have agreed two decades ago to carry a government-accessible tracking device, but that is precisely what they do when carrying a modern mobile phone or tablet.


This is insane!

Australia is leading in telecommunications interception, but somehow they feel that they need to have more powers, most notably the ability to keep Australian telecommunication and Internet data for two years.

Furthermore, all of this personal data is made public after 20 years:


Figures for ASIO's intercepts are classified and will only become available from the National Archives after more than 20 years.


www.smh.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 24-9-2012 by daaskapital because: ex



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:18 PM
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Not surprising.

People throw conniption fits over CCTVs in PUBLIC places, yet, they pee themselves in excitement over the next nifty new gadget phone they can't wait to get their paws on, voluntarily, of their own free will, that they'll take with them everywhere.

Yep.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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Originally posted by daaskapital
Furthermore, all of this personal data is made public after 20 years:


That's not what it says:


Figures for ASIO's intercepts are classified and will only become available from the National Archives after more than 20 years.


The figures will become available in 20 years, not the data.

Now, you only have to worry about hackers or whistleblowers getting their hands on the personal data that they're filing away and then finding your emails to dear Aunt Gloria on wikileaks someday.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:24 PM
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Meh.

Australias already one of the 5 all seeing eyes.

Echelon.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:26 PM
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Originally posted by adjensen

Originally posted by daaskapital
Furthermore, all of this personal data is made public after 20 years:


That's not what it says:


Figures for ASIO's intercepts are classified and will only become available from the National Archives after more than 20 years.


The figures will become available in 20 years, not the data.


Ah, but if one read the article, they would know that ASIO does release their investigative information after a specific time. The article provides cases where they released the information which resulted in the breakdown of the target...60 years after she was monitored...
edit on 24-9-2012 by daaskapital because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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Originally posted by daaskapital
Ah, but if one read the article, they would know that ASIO does release their investigative information after a specific time. The article provides cases where they released the information which resulted in the breakdown of the target...60 years after she was monitored...


Be that as it may, that's significantly different than saying all communications in Australia are going to be released to the public in 20 years.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:37 PM
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Steps

1.Get the LOTR movie in BluRay RAW format.
2.Rename it "How to kill your President.pdf"
3.Upload it to your second PC and make it public and indexed by Google.
4.Download it back again (no need to finish downloading).
5.Repeat step 4 and rename it occasionally.

20 years later, we have successfully archived LOTR for future generations to view and fill up few petabyte hard disk. (hey, its my tax worth!)

edit on 24-9-2012 by NullVoid because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:15 PM
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This is why you need to protect yourself by making sure Everything your ISP can get is encrypted.

I use Https Everywhere to be sure all sites I go to have a secure encrypted connection. This is a Firefox Plugin. I use this with the Tor Browser Bundle which is a browser and a network of encrypted servers all your data gets routed through. On top of that, I use a free VPN service ( Virtual Private Network) that has fast speeds and unlimited bandwidth such as VPNDirect Lite or Spotflux.

If you use all these together any data your ISP gets will be encrypted. They authorities would have to suspect you of a crime, then get some logs from the VPN. All they would find are hits on the Tor network servers that are encrypted. Many VPN's do not keep logs at all so they will have nothing to turn over. ( you can use a VPN network thats in another country) From your ISP's standpoint your ISP will only know you were connected to the Tor network and any links thanks to Https will be secure and encrypted. They can also see that your connected to a VPN but they cannot follow you on the VPN.The authorities would have to get all these bits of encrypted data and spend time and money to decrypt them and get proof of criminal activity before they can even force your ISP ( in most places) to haul you to court. They are not going to do this for thousands of internet users who are just trying to protect themselves unless they suspect you of breaking into a government computer or a bank.

That said, be sure these tools are legal for you to use. i know they are in the USA, but don't know about Australia.
edit on 24-9-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by JohnPhoenix
This is why you need to protect yourself by making sure Everything your ISP can get in encrypted.

I use Https Everywhere to be sure all sites I go to have a secure encrypted connection. This is a Firefox Plugin. I use this with the Tor Browser Bundle which is a browser and a network of encrypted servers all your data gets routed through. On top of that, I use a free VPN service that has fast speeds and unlimited bandwidth such as VPNDirect Lite or Spotflux.

That'd be good advice for certain people, but there are always ways to get what is needed. It's only a matter of time.

But the bigger question is why you go through all of this. What are you doing online or afraid of being "discovered" that has made you set things up as such?
edit on 2012.9.24 by TravisBickle451 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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Originally posted by TravisBickle451

Originally posted by JohnPhoenix
This is why you need to protect yourself by making sure Everything your ISP can get in encrypted.

I use Https Everywhere to be sure all sites I go to have a secure encrypted connection. This is a Firefox Plugin. I use this with the Tor Browser Bundle which is a browser and a network of encrypted servers all your data gets routed through. On top of that, I use a free VPN service that has fast speeds and unlimited bandwidth such as VPNDirect Lite or Spotflux.

That'd be good advice for certain people, but there are always ways to get what is needed. It's only a matter of time.

But the bigger question is why you go through all of this. What are you doing online or afraid of being "discovered" that has made you set things up as such?
edit on 2012.9.24 by TravisBickle451 because: (no reason given)


When i first started researching this I was asked the same question. here was my answer,


The answer would be, because I believe it is my right to have the utmost privacy and anonymity afforded.

We live in an age where everything one says or does is used against them. Miranda rights for example. Did you know the 5th amendment is not for criminals to squirm out of hot water but is for solid stand up citizens to protect themselves from the police? That's right. Even if your 100% innocent and tell them your story, and Tell The Truth this still can and will be used against you. Listen to what this Professor of Law, Dr. James Duane from the Regent Law School has to say on the subject : -www.youtube.com...

We live in an age where a silly 14 minute film showing how silly some extremist factions are (Freedom of Speech in the USA) can lead to world wide riots and murders.

We live in an age where law abiding legal citizen gun owners are being striped of their right to defend themselves by those in power taking away their guns.

We live in an age where when someone gets copies of documents that prove our leaders and government acted in bad taste or have done illegal things against it's own people and others and tries to share this with the world the person becomes branded as a terrorists and is hunted down like a criminal.

I could go on but I assume you get the point.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by JohnPhoenix
 


Me, my strategy is to bore whatever agency might be interested in me to death with my religious jabberings on ATS, inane Facebook posts and lolcat pictures of the kittehz, so that the one time I do want to do something nefarious, all watchers are asleep





posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 01:54 AM
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reply to post by daaskapital
 


So what else is new



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 03:28 AM
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Seems to be a concerted effort lately to increase internet surveillance by the English speaking powers. The US President recently passed legislation, by executive order, that will coerce ISP's into providing all their information to the government for surveillance purposes. We're also getting a shiny new FBI data interception and retention center. I wonder where they're going with this.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 03:53 AM
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reply to post by daaskapital
 


I said it once, twice... here it is again:


Originally posted by this_is_who_we_are
reply to post by ninjas4321
 


"FBI renews broad Internet surveillance push"?

This really is who we are:


But now you can't even really hide in the corner of your own flat.

FBI renews broad Internet surveillance push
www.abovetopsecret.com...



edit on 9/25/2012 by this_is_who_we_are because: typo



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 03:56 AM
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reply to post by Magnus47
 


How about that new NSA data center they just built in Utah. Dark Days indeed.

Groundbreaking Ceremony Held for $1.2 Billion NSA Utah Data Center
www.abovetopsecret.com...


edit on 9/25/2012 by this_is_who_we_are because: typo



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:01 AM
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Originally posted by this_is_who_we_are
reply to post by Magnus47
 


How about that new NSA data center they just built in Utah. Dark Days indeed.

Groundbreaking Ceremony Held for $1.2 Billion NSA Utah Data Center
www.abovetopsecret.com...


edit on 9/25/2012 by this_is_who_we_are because: typo


Using taxpayer money to spy on taxpayer, nice.
Combined with TSA its super!
Power to the government over "We the people" sounds very much like ....you know.




Revolutionary
The existing structure is overthrown by a completely new group. The new group can be very small - such as the military - or very large - as in a popular revolution. After a period of time, this 'becomes' one of the other type of government (unless there is another coup or uprising).

edit on 25-9-2012 by NullVoid because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 05:53 AM
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I would hate to live in Australia. I hear nothing but corruption and big government from the few people i have spoken to who lives there (Complaining). Might as well.

Australia is a constitutional monarchy any how. Inhabitants cant complain if they still have a Queen (Governor General) who has major power.

Do what America did and what America may have to do soon, yet again. Revolt.

I am personally just waiting for the powering body in Mississippi to declare a threat of succession. Whether succession is legal or not, federal law doesn't apply to Mississippi if we aren't part of the Union. The federal government is becoming to big, i just hope it starts to piss off the states.
edit on 25-9-2012 by milkyway12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 06:03 AM
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morf won no I ma gnipyt sdrawkcab

Would that work?



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by RiverRunsFree
 


you'll have them totally stumped.




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