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Should I desex my 5mo puppy?

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posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 02:41 AM
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So the time has come to decide if my puppy should keep his balls.




I'm worried that if I do go ahead with the procedure, that he will become obese later in life.

And also I like it how he alerts us if anyone is near our property, and I have heard that without gonads this might not happen anymore.

So does anyone have any personal experience with this decision?

To desex or not to desex?

Cheers
Samuelis




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 02:46 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


The puppy says no!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 02:50 AM
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I don't know man, thats a tough choice.

This is gonna sound lame, but I avoid male dogs because of that choice, I guess I empathize to much and wouldn't have the heart to do it.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 02:55 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


yep,do it...she will love you for it in the run
I'm just saying,their worst than kids.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 02:56 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


Hi Samuelis!!
I have had many dogs I have had to go through this experience with! The questions you really need to ask yourself before you make the big 'snip' so to say, are things like;
Are you absolutely sure you will not want to breed him later in life?
Is this for energy/hyper active reasons? Because I understand if they are too much to handle so to say, why you would do so. Because when you decide to do this they will calm down quite considerably. it varies from dog to dog, which they still will be playful, but no doubt it will be at no such rate as before. Which is usually why some people do it.
Also, they do 'plump' up, look more swollen, but they will not become fat or obese unless you let their diets get bad. My boxer and pits are the main breeds I have had experience with bulking up after the procedure, but they actually look good! It depends on your liking!
If you are for sure you never want him to have puppies, and are trying to get him to calm down from being so active, vets can painlessly do this procedure for your dog! It is also something you can do later in life too after he's gotten his puppy years and fun out of the way. Not all dogs, but some, become very inactive after the snip. But some handle it just fine. It all depends on the dog!
BTW I think your pup is adorable! & I hope the best for you and him whatever decision you make!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:04 AM
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You control his food and his activity so obesity shouldn't be an issue unless you allow it.

And, his balls are very far away from his vocal cords so unless you have a very bad vet neuter him, his ability to bark should be intact post-operatively.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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reply to post by NiteNGale2
 


That is true! Even neutered, my dogs have never lost that instinctual urge to bark, especially at intruders or passerbys!! Lol



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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I often wonder why anyone would even consider doing it..

Poor thing has no choice.. can't voice an opinion and may never have the chance to continue the chain.

Heck, I'd be so angry if that had been decided to be done to me when I were a pup...

But here lies the conspiracy side of it.. what if this programme of chopping is just in case the world goes belly up..
would we be ready for loads of dogs breeding on the streets as they quickly turn back to their wolf like instincts?

There was a TV show where a train load of passengers accidently got put into a deep sleep. to awaken many years later and the world as they knew it has gone... a couple of them got eaten by a pack of 'wild' dogs..

show was called "the last train" if anyone cares to see..

If it were me.. keep him intact..the way he's supposed to be..



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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If you do decide to do it.. Make sure you have a very good vet. My Dad had a dog fixed, the same day they phoned and said they did not have room for the dog so he had to come and get him. He brought the dog home only to find out that the dog had chewed his stitches. cause the vet did not put the cone ASAP. That night the dog got the cone off and chewed himself and bled to death. It was very sad, and because of this I am against getting them fixed.

Good luck with your choice!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:45 AM
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reply to post by Keron
 


Oh my! That is so sad..
that just hurt my heart! I do hope you and your family made this vet responsible for his poor practice! Or at least put out the heads up to locals not to use his services for anything! I'm so sorry for your/your dads loss! It's hard to lose a companion!
Truth is, if you have no good reasons to do this procedure you shouldn't! I only suggest it for ceasing of breeding reasons or serious problems that need to be addressed! I am once again sorry for the experience you under went!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 03:59 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


Is that a Lab of sorts?
You want him neutered, if not he will pee on everything he deems his. He will be wild and jump all over everything. He will be running away at intervals looking for females. Also neutered dog will still be a fine guard dog. The one dog I have with testes intact is the least aggressive. While my two female dogs are ready to tear down the front door he lazily lays across the couch...the whole couch barking from a lying or seated postion. Giant lazy loafer


But generally speaking He will be a wild boy for awhile and if he's the first one you've had you may want to get him fixed

edit on 24-9-2012 by zonetripper2065 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:00 AM
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reply to post by Katharos62191
 


Thank you for your kind words. This vet was in a small town in Alberta Canada. A farming community. Apparently the vet over booked and that is why they did not have room to keep my dads dog. That's why they called him to pick him up. We found out after the fact that the vets office actually had a "sale" on. My Dad still has tears in his eyes today when he talks about "ATIM". And this was about 3 years ago. I will never bring my pet to get fixed ever again because of this.
What kind of vet has a sale???
Kind of like a doc having a sale on vasectomy's! Sick..



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:02 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


If that where the case it would be cheap.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 


Can't speak for others, but I will tell you why I got my dog neutered.

I have a great dane, and have had some before. I have had a huge Boerboel too, and a few other large to giant breed dogs, all male.

Have you ever seen what a giant breed male dog does when a bitch in heat walks past, outside the yard? Or when you are on a walk, and a bitch in heat walks past?

That male dog only has one thing on his mind then, when he is not neutered. Now, you try to control a 140lb dog pulling with all his strength to get to that bitch. It is not easy, and quite dangerous. Certainly don't want that happenning when my wife walks the dog, and the dog weights more than her.

And, no, its not about teaching the dog obedience to not act like that. It is instinct. After I have had some experiences like this, I always get my male dogs get fixed. Personally, it is not ideal, and I do not like to have it done, however, for large breed dogs, I would suggest it.

All my dogs grow up to their full size, are healthy and fit. No less active than normal, so yeah, out of personal experience I would say the choice is yours mate. Think about the pro's and con's of it. Do you want to breed them later on? Then obviously don't.

Just my 2 cents.

vvv
edit on 24-9-2012 by VreemdeVlieendeVoorwep because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:19 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


I had a Golden Retriever (called Hobbs), now I let hims keep his balls. (they are attached to them). What I did have to consider was his behavior as testosterone levels increased. There were no signs of aggression, but he did like chasing the girls and on the odd occasion even inanimate objects were the attention of his passion. However if you allow a dog to keep their balls (and I was warned of this), there is an increased chance of them developing testicular cancer. This happened when Hobb's was 13 years old. Luckily it was caught early enough and he lived, all be it without his nuts. I did notice him looking between his legs, and then glance over at me, with a questioning look, as if to say, WTF!! But he was fine and lived on happily until the ripe old age of 18 years!!


He was my best friend and I miss him dearly. My only advice to you is, let him keep his balls, and see how he develops into a young dog. If behavioral problems do develop then consider the procedure. But to make a decision now, on such a young pup will alter his behavior forever and you may miss out as a dog owner on some of his antics. (I have many stories)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 05:55 AM
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I would say without a doubt have him neutered....there are MILLIONS of dogs euthanised every year because we breed to many of them, and adding to that total of unwanted puppies is the cruelest thing. I'm very sad for people who have had bad experiences with surgery like this, but just this morning, I booked my Staffie in for this procedure. It has to be done. Having them removed will make no difference to his guard dog instincts. My last GSD was neutered and would have slayed anyone who threatened me or him. He also wasn't overweight. My dog before him was also a staffie, who I had to have neutered at age 12 to remove a testicular tumour, and the change in his behaviour before he was treated was plain nasty.Suddenly he was a monster who would have bitten me in a heartbeat. Surgery sorted him out, he got his gentleman personality back and he lived till 16.

Find a good vet, take a deep breath and get it done.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 07:32 AM
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reply to post by Samuelis
 


I notice that for animals the sex is not the badge of honor it is with humans. When an animal isn't neutered or fixed they seem preoccupied with getting some and they develop aggressive and dirty habits as a result of getting it and as well when they don't. They are the leg humpers. They want to run, They spray on the furniture. They are not content to stay home. When an un-neutered or fixed animal of the opposite sex shows up they will exhibit "bad" behaviors. By contrast an animal that is fixed will be a more well behaved, content and happier animal, and far more well adjusted.

Sex organs for an animal are like an itch that always needs scratching. I recommend you take away the itch. Only lazy dogs, who are not allowed outside to exercise, get dangerously obese.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 07:39 AM
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Originally posted by Samuelis
I'm worried that if I do go ahead with the procedure, that he will become obese later in life.

And also I like it how he alerts us if anyone is near our property, and I have heard that without gonads this might not happen anymore.


All four of my dogs are neutered and spayed. It's healthier for THEM, safer for YOU, and there will be no chance of accidentally bringing more unwanted dogs into the world.

My dogs ALL still alert and are very protective, thin and healthy. Obesity is caused by too much food and not enough exercise.


Why Neuter?



Decreased Aggression
Decreased Roaming
Increased Concentration
No Testicular Tumors
Improved Genetics
Fewer Hernias
Fewer Perianal Tumors
Fewer Prostate Problems

None of the behavioral or medical problems caused by testosterone are rare. Veterinarians deal with them on a daily basis. To say it in a way that may not sound very nice but is certainly true – veterinarians would make a lot less money if everyone neutered their male dogs before they were a year of age.


More details about each advantage at the link.

PLEASE! Neuter your gorgeous boy! It's an EASY surgery for boys (provided both his testicles have dropped - and even if they haven't, it's still easier than females) and he'll be just like normal (without the frustration) in a day.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 07:40 AM
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Originally posted by InitiumArietis
reply to post by Samuelis
 


I had a Golden Retriever (called Hobbs), now I let hims keep his balls. (they are attached to them). What I did have to consider was his behavior as testosterone levels increased. There were no signs of aggression, but he did like chasing the girls and on the odd occasion even inanimate objects were the attention of his passion. However if you allow a dog to keep their balls (and I was warned of this), there is an increased chance of them developing testicular cancer. This happened when Hobb's was 13 years old. Luckily it was caught early enough and he lived, all be it without his nuts. I did notice him looking between his legs, and then glance over at me, with a questioning look, as if to say, WTF!! But he was fine and lived on happily until the ripe old age of 18 years!!


He was my best friend and I miss him dearly. My only advice to you is, let him keep his balls, and see how he develops into a young dog. If behavioral problems do develop then consider the procedure. But to make a decision now, on such a young pup will alter his behavior forever and you may miss out as a dog owner on some of his antics. (I have many stories)


You're right you wouldn't have all those humping inanimate object stories, always fun to tell but it would have been less traumatic for your pet had you neutered him when he was young. He also would not have had to go through the frustration of "wanting but not getting" he could not describe and he would not have had to go through the trauma and vet expense later of testicular cancer. 18 years is a good long time though so I am not faulting you - I am sure your pet was happy and very well cared for. I just think the OP will still have many stories and in fact probably healthier and better stories if he makes the hard choice in favor of his pets happiness and does not apply human ideology to a helpless animal who cannot make the decision for himself. IMO -Unless this is a stud animal or a fighter - (which of course I would abhor) he should be fixed.
edit on 24-9-2012 by newcovenant because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by Extralien
 



Originally posted by Extralien
I often wonder why anyone would even consider doing it..


There are MANY reasons. If you're curious, look it up.




Heck, I'd be so angry if that had been decided to be done to me when I were a pup...


Dogs are NOT people. They do not react like a person would.


Originally posted by InitiumArietis
If behavioral problems do develop then consider the procedure.


NEVER let a behavioral problem develop that could have been prevented.



But to make a decision now, on such a young pup will alter his behavior forever


There is no evidence that this is true.



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