As Corn prices soar Farmers turn to feeding Cows with Gummie worms and Cookies

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posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 08:36 AM
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Originally posted by davespanners
This is one of those stories I literally could not believe when I read it, but I've checked my calendar and it isn't April fools so I'm going to guess it's true.


As the worst drought in half a century has ravaged this year's U.S. corn crop and driven corn prices sky high, the market for alternative feed rations for beef and dairy cows has also skyrocketed. Brokers are gathering up discarded food products and putting them out for the highest bid to feed lot operators and dairy producers, who are scrambling to keep their animals fed. In the mix are cookies, gummy worms, marshmallows, fruit loops, orange peels, even dried cranberries. Cattlemen are feeding virtually anything they can get their hands on that will replace the starchy sugar content traditionally delivered to the animals through corn

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This has to qualify as one of the most insane things I've read in a while, I'm not going to pretend I'm a Bovine nutrition expert but if I were going to put together a list of things that might be good for a Cow to eat then Marshmallows wouldn't be on it, I wonder if they have thought of trying something crazy like feeding the Cows Grass before resorting to cookies?

For anyone with any knowledge of farming I would like to know what exactly did Farmers feed cows before the massive subsidies on corn came about and why don't they go back to that now?

edit on 23-9-2012 by davespanners because: (no reason given)
edit on 23-9-2012 by davespanners because: (no reason given)


Cows used to be left out on the open range to graze, but you can't do that now, if someone doesn't own the land and sticks a fence on it, then the government owns it and then sticks a fence on it. Those days have gone bye-bye.




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:05 AM
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Originally posted by AlreadyGone
reply to post by superman2012
 


The underground aquifers have been the solution for large scale farmers out west for the last 50 years. But with abundant use, even their levels are receeding... look into the Ogallala Aquifer. It is massive, and yet... continual and substantive use is starting to deplete it.

Worse yet, as the water levels receed... the mineral and salts content goes up. Thus, over the course of the next generations, we will be poisoning the very lands we wish to cultivate.


I'll donate all the snow in my yard this winter, we just have to find a way to get it there...



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:08 AM
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Open more breweries! Seriously.

Local breweries use the spent grains from the wort to feed local cattle. The wort is the liquid that results from the steeping of grains into boiling water. This acts as the catalyst for the yeasts to begin fermentation since the grains will impart the sugars that the yeast eats - thus creating alcohol. An active brewery probably goes through a couple tons of grains a month.

As far as eating beef from a brewery-fed cow - you won't have to ask me twice!



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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Oddly enough, there was an experiment done in Britain where they fed the cows an appreciable %age of Newspaper.....

Aparently they gobbled it up with a mix of other feed to make the up nutritional needs etc.
I do recall seeing a shot of cows eating pages of the London Times or something......
The whole system of food production is corrupted. Capitalism is NOT the way to go wholely, as the markets then dictate whats grown or produced...If its not food thats making the farms money, you get short shrift.
Corn is a net taker of nurishment from the earth, and gives little in return for the soil.
Fertilizers must be added as well as other chemicals constantly to keep up production.
Bean, Peas and alfalfa, as well as other healthier foods which return nourishment to the earth as well, could easily be used instead of corn.
ALGAE< believe it or not, has thousands of times the potential for fuel production than corn anyways......Corn does not produce much signifigant fuel compared to the fuel it takes to grow etc...and the fertilizers it needs by the ton.....



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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everything they're feeding the cows is made from high fructose corn syrup anyway, so i don't see a problem with keeping them alive for a while on that. better than watching them and us starve.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by stirling
Oddly enough, there was an experiment done in Britain where they fed the cows an appreciable %age of Newspaper.....

Aparently they gobbled it up with a mix of other feed to make the up nutritional needs etc.
I do recall seeing a shot of cows eating pages of the London Times or something......
The whole system of food production is corrupted. Capitalism is NOT the way to go wholely, as the markets then dictate whats grown or produced...If its not food thats making the farms money, you get short shrift.
Corn is a net taker of nurishment from the earth, and gives little in return for the soil.
Fertilizers must be added as well as other chemicals constantly to keep up production.
Bean, Peas and alfalfa, as well as other healthier foods which return nourishment to the earth as well, could easily be used instead of corn.
ALGAE< believe it or not, has thousands of times the potential for fuel production than corn anyways......Corn does not produce much signifigant fuel compared to the fuel it takes to grow etc...and the fertilizers it needs by the ton.....


actually corn is an excellent form of nourishment, non GMO anyway. if they could take a lesson from my ancestors and plant it properly there would be less problems. we had a system and we called it "the three sisters" you plant squash on the ground, beans to climb up the corn which you plant in the center.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:33 AM
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Unfortunatly, this practice is not new. My wifes mom and brother live on a farm, and raise 30-60 head. They also have an additinoal 125 acres with some cattle. They all graze and have hay in the winter, except when they don't get rain and have to feed hay in the summer. This year they had to let the cattle go into the pasture that's normally fenced off to grow winter hay...
Anyway, back before we got married, she was telling me how the local farmers would suppliment cattle and hog feed with potato chips from a local producer, as well as day old stuff that didn't sell from the breadstores. Stuff like loafs of bread, and twinkies. She also told me how they wold feed them candy too. The worse part? The wrappers were still on the candy!!
So for years, I've bought only grassfed organically raised beef from local producers that I trust that will let you actually visit their ranch. It cost more, but I did a comparioson on an on-line inflation calculator, and I'm paying no more for my beef than my grandparents did in 1940 when adjusted for inflation. They also had their beef analyzed, si I know exactly what's in it. What's great is the omega 3:6 ratio. There's more omega 3 than 6. Grain fed has a ratio of like 18 of omega 6 to less than 1 of omega three. So we sve money on fidh oil too, because we don't need it since the beef is raised on grass.
We drink raw, unpasturized milk too. The story behind grocery store milk is as disgusting as cows fed candy...



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:47 AM
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Originally posted by superman2012

Originally posted by crazyguy2012
reply to post by superman2012
 


true. But that would then affect beef prices later on. Which eventually will happen with this drought. I am already seeing increased food prices and meat prices. I am also seeing a huge decline in the quality of meat that is now available.

Maybe we should apply the same principle to keep the population down to manageable levels as well? Maybe mother earth will do that by herself?


Agreed. Beef prices are going to be affected either way, which is good for us up in Canada (although at the expense of the US farmers is not a good way to profit). Try ostrich steaks or moose steaks. They are a little more expensive (unless you hunt the moose yourself) but they are way more tender then the quality of beef out there. In stores anyways. Try a local cattle farmer, they are more than willing to sell a cow (butchered and wrapped) up here, I don't know about the US though.



S&F FOR YOU MY DEAR FRIEND!!!!!
signed, your local usa, grain and alfalfa fed Ostrich farmer



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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Originally posted by TXRabbit
Open more breweries! Seriously.

Local breweries use the spent grains from the wort to feed local cattle. The wort is the liquid that results from the steeping of grains into boiling water. This acts as the catalyst for the yeasts to begin fermentation since the grains will impart the sugars that the yeast eats - thus creating alcohol. An active brewery probably goes through a couple tons of grains a month.

As far as eating beef from a brewery-fed cow - you won't have to ask me twice!


Also the ethanol plants sell the mash to the farmers real cheap or give it away. They local brewery gave as much as you wanted to haul nothing like riding behind a farmers truck that had just left the brewery and the juice just pouring out the back all over your car



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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Most of these cows probably grew up on grass and such. It's after they are sold to the feed lots that this is happening. This is a bad sign though. If the feed lots go bankrupt, or cannot stay afloat, then there will be no middleman and then it will be too expensive to afford, yet there will be no outlet to sell for the farmers at the same time. Perhaps McDonalds should jump in and take on the responsibility, oh wait... I forgot. McDonalds could give a # less what their beef eats as long as they still look like hamburgers when they come in. How nice would it be if the only place you could get beef was right from the farm. The reality is, most of the beef in our country is perfectly healthy UNTIL it gets to the feed lots anyways. It's at this point where they completely destroy all the healthy benefits of the meat. The chicken market on the other hank is completely rotten to the core throughout the whole process. Too bad 90% o the vegetables available on the market are also void of anything healthy these days. Guess the only choice left if you want healthy children is to move to the country and raise your own food.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 11:12 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 11:36 AM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


If you come here in my neck of the woods in south Ga, you still see beautiful fields of open pastures full wiht cows and in the spring you get to see all the babies born.

I just love to travel in the back woods and see the picture of healthy cows, it gives me hope that at least Mospanto and their crap has not damage all that is beautiful in nature in some areas.




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 11:50 AM
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I've been having a look round some of the cattle feed sites after posting this and from what I find Gummie worms are actually on the nice side of what people are feeding cattle.

Take this example

Cattle remains are still fed to chickens, for example, and the poultry litter (floor wastes that include the feces and spilled feed) is fed back to cows.

Link

So chickens are fed Cow carcasses and Cows are fed with the Chicken "waste"
What on earth



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 11:53 AM
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This is exactly why I am so thankful for the butcher up the road who sells grass fed beef....
Also, ground goat meat is just as tasty..

We all should just realize that we as Americans are systematically being culled.....

Its time for us to really stand up and take back what is rightfully ours....NON GMO SEEDS!!!!!




posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by davespanners
 


When i was a youngster in southern Georgia I knew a pig farmer that gave his pigs tons of candy that had been pull off the shelves. If it was in a paper wrapper he just threw it to the hogs. I believe he got the candy in bulk from some place because he had huge boxes of it. I just remember eating my fill of chocolate bars with peanuts in them. I think farmers will feed their livestock anything they can get in bulk that has calories in it.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 01:20 PM
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Ugh, the rabbits in the woods behind my house are looking more yummy than ever. Seriously though, after reading about how some region actually imported a hideous disease, myxomatosis, to curb rabbit populations, and reading how Oz had more rabbits than they want, I wish we suburban dwellers had the option of rabbit in our supermarket. I think that would solve the demand for meat based protein and give areas inundated with rabbits a break. At the very least, use more rabbit in pet foods. So far my cats and dog are in direct competition with me for chicken, beef and salmon, if the labels on their foods are anything to go by. If humans aren't eating more bunny, at least give some more over to the cats and dogs. It would be healthier for them to get a whole, healthy rabbit instead of the nasty leftover and polluted chicken, beef, and fish they get now. Unless I'm missing something about rabbit meat being harmful or difficult to package and sell, I think rabbit is the way to go and is an option I'd choose if it were available. I used to see rabbit meat in the supermarket twenty or thirty years ago, but not any more.

In case anyone wonders why I don't eat the rabbits in my woods, it's illegal to hunt them because we can't set traps or shoot safely in the suburbs, among other limitations I can think of. Just stating the obvious.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by SheeplFlavoredAgain
 


In a neighboring town there is a fish market we use when we want fresh fish but don't have time to go catch them ourselves. At this particular market you can buy everything under the sun- from rabbit or raccoon to emu or wild boar. You might try checking around in a few less obvious places- you might find what you're looking for. Sometimes a short drive is well worth the trip.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by crazyguy2012
 


Veal! Cull them while they are young! Old cow, young cow, what is the difference when you are a cow-eater?

Cows are cud-chewers. What are the farmers feeding them to supply that? Bubble gum? Junk food is still not healthy even for hungry cows; it's malnutrition even if they get fat. I haven't seen such product manipulation since farmers force-fed geese for fatty liver. It's as bad as expecting your dog to go vegetarian. There is food and a system, and a lot of open hands along the way asking for money. The farmers are cutting corners, and quite frankly, being stupid by feeding cows candy. This takes frankenfood to another level.

It has been a hard summer, but this is cheating. It's like putting melamine in milk, selling it for infants. It means, the system is broken. These are smaller brand farmers are they not? Not the big McFarms for the fast food restaurants? It is a bad year, it's true. The drought made it hard. The cheaters make it harder. Cutting corners today can start a bad habit in farming. Some countries have standards against this kind of adulteration of cows.



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by davespanners
This is one of those stories I literally could not believe when I read it, but I've checked my calendar and it isn't April fools so I'm going to guess it's true.


As the worst drought in half a century has ravaged this year's U.S. corn crop and driven corn prices sky high, the market for alternative feed rations for beef and dairy cows has also skyrocketed. Brokers are gathering up discarded food products and putting them out for the highest bid to feed lot operators and dairy producers, who are scrambling to keep their animals fed. In the mix are cookies, gummy worms, marshmallows, fruit loops, orange peels, even dried cranberries. Cattlemen are feeding virtually anything they can get their hands on that will replace the starchy sugar content traditionally delivered to the animals through corn

Link

This has to qualify as one of the most insane things I've read in a while, I'm not going to pretend I'm a Bovine nutrition expert but if I were going to put together a list of things that might be good for a Cow to eat then Marshmallows wouldn't be on it, I wonder if they have thought of trying something crazy like feeding the Cows Grass before resorting to cookies?

For anyone with any knowledge of farming I would like to know what exactly did Farmers feed cows before the massive subsidies on corn came about and why don't they go back to that now?

edit on 23-9-2012 by davespanners because: (no reason given)
edit on 23-9-2012 by davespanners because: (no reason given)


Here is the sad part: the cows are being fed marshmallows. Made with gelatin, which comes from animals, like cows and pigs. That's against food hygiene laws for at least 2 out of 3 of the Abrahamic religions. Farmer Yoder isn't making this any easier for those with specialized diets.

You know if they took all the cereal grains off the shelves at your supermarket and gave it to the cow farmers, it would solve two problems: the obesity crisis in humans and the hunger crisis in cows. Cows on fruit loops and sprinkles though... clown cows.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 07:12 AM
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Cows are ment to eat greens, nothing else really they don't have the digestive system for it. Corn is even horrible for them, it slowly kills them due to the fact that there bodies can't digest it. And hey did you know that the e coli problem we have didn't exist before we feed cows corn.

www.youtube.com...

Food inc is a movie everyone should watch in my opinion, Though I do believe "organic" is a line of bull, its getting us on the right track. There are many natural ways of farming that can produce high yeilds of food. One being hugelkulture which allows you to turn a single acre of land into almost 2 acres of growing space.

Also are we still using corn to produce ethanol ? one of the main reasons why corn prices rose so much to begin with I remeber 10 years ago when you could buy a 50# bag of corn for like 5-10 bucks now its in upwards of 20 dollars. And I remeber reading somewhere that the amount of ethanol produced isn't even enough to power the tractors that harvest the corn.
edit on 25-9-2012 by bigcountry08 because: (no reason given)
edit on 25-9-2012 by bigcountry08 because: (no reason given)
edit on 25-9-2012 by bigcountry08 because: (no reason given)





 
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