Neutron Monitor Off The Chart

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posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 12:32 PM
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This is a new site to me. Don't have a clue what it means. Sorry if this has been posted or in the wrong category.
helios.izmiran.ru...
cr0.izmiran.rssi.ru...
edit on 23-9-2012 by GoldenRuled because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 12:52 PM
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Either faulty equipment and readings or its not good, not good at all



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 12:57 PM
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I'm not to clued in on this but there seems to be a decent flare emitted from the sun

sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by GoldenRuled
 

WoW. Is this a ground based detector? Can we get an english version of your second link? Also not sure of scale of graph.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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it seems to be a malfunction since it can't be corroborated with other monitors.

cosray.phys.uoa.gr...



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:00 PM
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I'm not seeing it. Are you talking about that tiny little bit at the edge of the graph?



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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A neutron monitor is a ground-based detector designed to measure the number of high-energy charged particles striking the Earth's atmosphere from outer space. For historical reasons the incoming particles are called "cosmic rays", but in fact they are particles, predominantly protons and Helium nuclei. Most of the time, a neutron monitor records galactic cosmic rays and their variation with the 11-year sunspot cycle and 22-year magnetic cycle. Occasionally the Sun emits cosmic rays of sufficient energy and intensity to raise radiation levels on Earth's surface to the degree that they are readily detected by neutron monitors. They are termed "Ground Level Enhancements" (GLE). The neutron monitor was invented by University of Chicago Professor John A. Simpson in 1948.[1] The "18-tube" NM64 monitor, which today is the international standard, is a large instrument weighing about 36 tons.

Wiki



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:18 PM
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What about this one in Athens?

cosray.phys.uoa.gr...



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:19 PM
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Seems like SOHO EIT 195 is badly pixelated


SAM on SDO is off


SDO-EVE is off



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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reply to post by intrptr
 


That shows the opposite of what my original link reads but as extreme. Any experts in the field here?



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:23 PM
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Originally posted by LittleBlackEagle
it seems to be a malfunction since it can't be corroborated with other monitors.

cosray.phys.uoa.gr...


So then can you tell me what that huge 4 point drop means?



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:24 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
What about this one in Athens?

cosray.phys.uoa.gr...


Opposite phase, curious.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 01:58 PM
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So, is it a malfunction? That is a REALLY large spike at the end of the chart there.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 02:22 PM
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Originally posted by GoldenRuled
reply to post by intrptr
 


That shows the opposite of what my original link reads but as extreme. Any experts in the field here?


I'm not expert. And the "spike" is gone from the Athens chart... Should of took a screen shot. I was going to take a screenshot...(derp)

The positive negative thing is a deviation from the norm. Each neutron strike is an event that is counted. The "average" number of counts is a "baseline". Below that number is less counts than the norm and above is more counts. There are menus at the left of the page on the Athens link. You can check sites all over the world. The "Kerg" track is the Moscow site and it reflects negative here as well. So... it would indicate a glitch in the instrument. Maybe a power issue or technician on break messin' with us? Dunno...

Waiting to hear from others or further developments. The Athens link doesn't let me bring search results, just the home page. Goto the menu on left and select "NMDB DataBase" and under that "data". Thats the link to online stations around the world. At the bottom of that menu under "scale" click on "counts". Thats counts per minute or (CPM). Thats easier for people to understand.

I hate the scientific community for always making things PHD speak... mad:

cosray.phys.uoa.gr...:



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 07:15 PM
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this and them fireball's....
there coming



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 07:17 PM
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reply to post by GoldenRuled
 


Anyway, thanks for keeping us informed about these kinds of events. You never know when something significant is going to begin. It could be our own sun acting up, or could even be a deep space event such as a supernova. Thanks for the link to the world wide web of detectors.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 07:31 PM
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Here's a link to the University of Delaware. It appears of friends in Mockba have correct readings.

neutronm.bartol.udel.edu...



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 07:46 PM
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The last time this happened there was a subsequent spike in Iodine 131 from Neutrons hitting Tellurium.

Take more iodine based food like Sea salt or sesame seeds. Especially children.
You can buy sesame seeds in honey 4 1"x2" slabs for about 37p at Sainsburys.

I bet this explains why the UK had a storm as cosmic rays increase cloud cover. I heard it was 7 miles high in some places.


In fact I had a dream two days ago that there was going to be a storm. And that the river Mississippi was going to flood and flow the wrong way. In the dream we were shopping near Sevenoaks. It was a weird dream.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 08:40 PM
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Something's coming...


Dun dun duuuuuuuuun



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 10:08 PM
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Interesting find and post op. Stars and Flags. Wonder if all these numbers and charts mean anything.






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