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Young Americans: Out of College, Out of Work, & Voting seriously?

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posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:26 PM
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Originally posted by Bodhi911

Originally posted by HumanitiesLastHope
Well that may be true, but when your on national television speaking with a news anchor you should at least show some respect and take it serious.


The guy is talking to some miss America character on a network that routinely shows no respect whatsoever to people being interviewed. If this was a serious news network and they tried to do a decent job, they would deserve respect for it. But this is Fox News. With some superficial popularity queen. Its not exactly real journalists that are digging for truth here.



However I never mentioned I was voting or whom for so I'm not quite sure why you attacked me with that, but I hope I cleared things up and answered your questions. So would you be so kind to answer the ones I presented?


Im honestly sorry if you felt personally attacked because that wasnt my intention at all. Perhaps my frustration with your system made me sound a bit too aggressive. I just wanted to explain why I think this guy didnt take Fox News seriously, and why I feel that the most efficient vote for change is not to vote at all.

I dont know if this is how most young Americans view things (which is one of your questions), but I actually kind of hope they do because you wont get any change in this corrupted system by supporting it by voting.


edit on 23-9-2012 by Bodhi911 because: (no reason given)


Ok, and Its not my system.




posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:29 PM
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reply to post by ColCurious
 



Originally posted by ColCurious
reply to post by HumanitiesLastHope
 

Holy crap, that was some really bad quality television.

Both the kid and the interviewer should not be on television in my opinion.

Was that kid high on something? Really embarrassing behaviour.

*ETA:
I don't get to watch much U.S. television, so maybe this is considered "normal"?
edit on 23-9-2012 by ColCurious because: (no reason given)


Yeah I was shocked too, and I was thinking he was either high,nervous, or just joking around. I hardly watch normal tv either but when I do I see funny stuff like that, so I guess its normal.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:33 PM
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reply to post by detachedindividual
 



Originally posted by detachedindividual
reply to post by HumanitiesLastHope
 


Honestly? I think you can tell that this guy is deliberately trying to embarrass Faux news. Occupy the media.


I love it, I think it's pretty funny, and it does a pretty good job of exposing the biased BS Fox for what it is.


Well If that was intent then props to him, but if that was him being serious than that is scary especially since hes a college grad and is "educated". If a trend starts with young people on the news acting silly during interviews that will be funny.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:44 PM
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reply to post by PatrickGarrow17
 



Originally posted by PatrickGarrow17
haaaaa funny.

Didn't do himself any favors in the job market on that one.

I'm 21 soon 22. Graduated HS in '08, so those in my class that went to four year schools just graduated this past spring. Common college culture isn't helping the problems in America. For many, it is an opportunity for a fun social time and little else.

I don't have a job right now, but am working on some projects that I believe to be potentially very profitable. I don't have a degree and am not currently enrolled, have done two semesters of college and am in good standing to go back if I need to. Generally, I am pretty different than the average person my age.

Pretty sure the proportion of young people unequipped to make a responsible decision at the ballot is no more today than it was 10,20, or 30 years ago. There is something to be said for idealism and a care free optimism, seeing humor where it's scarce. I'll defend the peers of my age group until the end, and I believe the youth is about the best thing America has going for them right now. Still looking for purpose, but skilled in friendly communication and more unity oriented. When the wake up call comes that problems abound and there are serious matters, many in the young demographic will be eager to help others and contribute in the idealist fashion.


Its pretty scary how similar situations we are In. But I guess that is almost the typical/usual situation for people around that age. That is true with out the youth how could usa move into the future. I don't know if I would defend them, because I feel most of them are already indoctrinated by the corruption.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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reply to post by martianmallow
 



Originally posted by martianmallow
I graduated from technical school a year ago and can't get a job in my field of study so I work retail. Terrible pay rate, nobody working there can live on their own. I live with my parents currently and I'm disgusted with how my peers regard politics. Really, most people my age are apathetic. Why did they have this guy on there to represent the youth of America anyway? Why didn't they pick someone that actually cares about this country?
Is this how they want the nation to see us young people? It's really sad.

As for myself, I'll be voting for Johnson. Why? Because he gets it. If you don't know anything about our Libertarian candidate, look him up! I didn't know much about him until he did an interview on reddit. I liked him because he answered questions that matter in a brief and to the point manner, and I found myself in agreement with him on a wide span of issues. Conversely Obama's reddit interview consisted of paragraph-long answers that edged around the real meat of the issue and I could just hear his voice droning on in my head.

I don't hate Romney, but he's really not the best choice for anyone if you want to change what's wrong with this country. He's made a political career for himself and the Presidency is just sealing his retirement as a very rich man in 4 years. I can't take that seriously. But if a third party has any chance of winning, or at least posing a threat, my peers really need to wake up and start caring before we have to live with our parents until our 30s.
edit on 9/23/2012 by martianmallow because: (no reason given)


Ahh I see. I often feared if my fate would be similar when I finish. Yeah I have a feeling they did that on purpose to portray this generation as irresponsible and not serious. Theres usually an agenda behind what they do.

Johnson never heard of him lol. I guess MSM did there job
because I haven't even heard about him on tv. I guess I'll have to look him up. But in this two party dictatorship I doubt he'll win.

Yeah Romney seems like hes only in it for himself and the rich.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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As someone who fits into this demographic, after watching this I said to myself, "is this a joke?" To be honest, most of the people my age that I know, even on a cursory level, have a better grasp of what is happening politically than a lot of older Americans. Again, I am speaking from my own experience, but I do not think my experience is unique. Left with little prospects after college is forcing young Americans to really take a look at what is going on, both with the economy as well as what is happening politically.

If they were trying to scout out a "young person" that was going to vote for Romney this fall, then in a way, I'm not surprised that this is the caliber of the individual.

It's interesting. This prompted me to log on to Facebook for the first time in a while and see who out of my 802 "friends" liked as presidential candidates. 45 for Obama, 11 for Romney (of those 11, 5 have jobs in the financial sector, and 3 are in the military), and 3 for Gary Johnson, and just for fun, Ron Paul with 21. Take it for what you will, but I really do not know many politically involved twenty-somethings that are willing to vote for Romney.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:52 PM
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reply to post by Hefficide
 



Originally posted by Hefficide

Ladies and gentlemen welcome to "generation lulz" where creating sound and video bytes, for the sake of Youtube glory is the most relevant and noble thing that one can do. Kids, these days, are in it for the laughs. I've got four family members in the 17-21 age group and this is how they perceive the world - through lulz.

If you try to have a serious conversation with them they pretty much will tell you "Why should I care? It's all gone down the toilet anyway..."

Gen X became "generation doom" somewhere along the line - and now or kids are reacting to it.

The good news is that these kids can be serious. I just hope they are on voting day because we truly do live in a world where a meme could give rise to "President Carrot Top" or something along those lines.

All for the lulz.

~Heff

( BTW when the term "gen lulz" catches on, remember who coined it!
)


Thats pretty funny and true. I think that if the generation didn't laugh it off and took things serious everyone would be to depressed or we would have a revolution or something. So I think that most of gen lulz stays asleep and laughs or makes jokes of everything because the reality is far to much for them to handle.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by Resonant
 



Originally posted by Resonant
As someone who fits into this demographic, after watching this I said to myself, "is this a joke?" To be honest, most of the people my age that I know, even on a cursory level, have a better grasp of what is happening politically than a lot of older Americans. Again, I am speaking from my own experience, but I do not think my experience is unique. Left with little prospects after college is forcing young Americans to really take a look at what is going on, both with the economy as well as what is happening politically.

If they were trying to scout out a "young person" that was going to vote for Romney this fall, then in a way, I'm not surprised that this is the caliber of the individual.

It's interesting. This prompted me to log on to Facebook for the first time in a while and see who out of my 802 "friends" liked as presidential candidates. 45 for Obama, 11 for Romney (of those 11, 5 have jobs in the financial sector, and 3 are in the military), and 3 for Gary Johnson, and just for fun, Ron Paul with 21. Take it for what you will, but I really do not know many politically involved twenty-somethings that are willing to vote for Romney.


That is really interesting. I like the approach you took, you used facebook in a productive way
props to you. Those numbers are interesting and I think it makes since. Thanks for taking the time to do that, and your insight. If that poll represents what will potentially happen this november than I guess its safe to predict Obama will win.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 05:05 PM
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reply to post by HumanitiesLastHope
 


I think it's safe to bet that Obama will win the youth vote, overwhelmingly. I personally feel that most in my demographic don't necessarily like Obama very much, but they find him to be a better prospect than Mitt Romney. I'm voting for Gary Johnson, however, because I refuse to vote for a candidate that I don't believe in.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by charles1952
 



Originally posted by charles1952
reply to post by HumanitiesLastHope
 

Dear HumanitiesLastHope,

Yeah I see what you are saying, and that makes perfect sense. You almost took the words right out of my mouth . However I'm just a little confused, when you say the youth is about fourth on the list what do you mean? Isn't the youth the most important since they take over and are the future of this country.


You're absolutely right, I may be confusing important with urgent. There was a reason I put it fourth, though. The other three, at least in my mind, are the possibility of nuclear war centered in the Mid-East, a global economic collapse bringing us into a world-wide depression, and the removal of most citizens' rights in case of the election of a President, and his Supreme Court picks, wanting to destroy the Constitution.

May I thank you, over and over, for reading my post and noticing that problem? You've got a great style. Stick around and keep checking things against reason. We need you around here.

With respect,
Charles1952


Well my answer to you in these two pics



and






I guess in a list like that the youth does come in fourth, except for in any of those situations the outcome of the youth is most important for the future.

(ps does anyone know how to embed images like I did with the vid in the op? any help will be much apreciated)



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 05:31 PM
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reply to post by HumanitiesLastHope
 


Dear HumanitiesLastHope,

I'm really sorry for causing doubt in your mind. Sure, I understand what ATS can be like. Sometimes the posters get nasty and hateful, and try to mock people. When I see that happening I walk away from the thread. Truly, with all honesty, I'm here primarily to learn things. Further down on my list is a desire to share what I know and think. But I always try to build people up, or at least not tear them down.

I was completely serious that I was glad you caught me saying something that was imprecise and confusing. I don't troll or make fun of people. (Well, Ok, I have made fun of someone maybe four or five times, but cut me some slack, I was newer here then.)

I guess in a list like that the youth does come in fourth, except for in any of those situations the outcome of the youth is most important for the future.
And here you've raised another good point which I overlooked. Why can't we work on all of them at once? You're right, we should be able to. I just don't see it happening. My fear is we're just drifting, waiting to see what catastrophe strikes first.

With respect,
Charles1952



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 06:42 PM
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First of all, I don't think using an obvious hoaxing of Fox News to make your point is a good idea and second , to your main point, why shouldn't people who are unemployed vote ? There are many adults and older people who are also out of work and facing hard times. Should you ask the same question of them ?
edit on 23-9-2012 by skepticconwatcher because: grammar



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 08:18 PM
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Why vote in the first place, the people that are elected were not chosen by the people but by mafia organizations, the elected persona should be representing the people but its actually the opposite of it, how many Americans actually want to drive gasoline powered vehicles when the prices keep going up? How many citizens want HEMP to be decriminalized, so that lumber, toxic chemicals, and fuel for power and vehicles can be replaced? and much more i can add to the list of what people actually want, but voting for actors that speak on the behalf of a corporation is no solution, and i see why this interview was not taken seriously, because they are not actually discussing anything that would result in a solution to the economic state, but nothing more then a good show for an audience.

Voting changes nothing, "Presidents" don't have a say in anything, and when they do try and take that power and give it to the people, well we all know what happens (JFK assassination, his brother and Luther)

So why vote at all? or take actors seriously?



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