Grigg's Mansion in Minnesota most Haunted Mansion in St. Paul.

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posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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I personally don't have that kind of money 1.1 million, nor $700,000 but it might be interesting to own. if I did. If you did have that kind of money what would you eventually using the house for? Might be kind of interesting to own, I don't know charge for a Holoween party. Who knows, What I'm asking if you had that kind of noney what would you use it for?

Has anybody ever owned a haunted house?




Daily Mail Reporter




























edit on 22-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: change




posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by 1loserel2
 



My folks did. They sold the house because of it.


So as the story goes. I am not sure if I remember the actual event that "broke the camels back" so to say of if it is just because I have heard the story a gabilion times.

I was sitting on the floor of my bedroom when my mother walked in and saw me rolling a ball to someone that was not there and he would role the ball back to me. At this point my mom grabbed me up, went to the neighbors and called my dad. The house went on the market soon after.

I remember talking to folks about a boy that would hang out in my room and and vaguely remember him. I overheard my Dad telling my Mom that all kids have imaginary friends and its ok. I never had an imaginary friend before or after.
edit on 22-9-2012 by BlastedCaddy because: story to tell



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by 1loserel2
 


That house is beautiful, I would love to buy it and live there! I'm okay with it being haunted I see no reason why we can't coexist. Too bad I'm not filthy rich...

Maybe I'll drive by it one of these nights.



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 08:23 AM
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reply to post by BlastedCaddy
 


Your mom was right in doing what she did. I probably would've done the same thing. It's a shame when that happens and you can't live in the house you started growing up in. On the other hand if it were just me and my spouse, I might keep it and try to exorcise it. But I don't think it would've been good for you, you never know the intent of spirits. Did she ever see or feel anything else in the house? That would've been another good incentive to get rid of it, especially when at young age children are so easily influenced,

I've always thought that after becoming an adult that perhaps if you had an imaginary friend as a young child, it wasn't so imaginary.
edit on 23-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: typo



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by ucantcme
 


If it were just me or my spouse, I think it would be interesting to have a haunted house. But hang in their, I saw it was first listed at 1.8 million, now it's down to $700,000, perhaps it'll get lower. If I lived near their I'd probably want to drive by and see it too , I've had a few strange things happen where I'm kuvung at, but I've never been in a verified haunted house before..
edit on 23-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: add



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 12:07 PM
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Nice looking house but I don't think I could ever live in a house that has so much history, and knowing that someone has hanged herself in that space. It would be hard not to think it has some kind of a negative energy... Also maybe the cost is justified since you will be sharing it with 7 non-paying 'spirits' inhabitants



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 09:07 PM
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Oh its absolutely beautiful.

Is this the same house ? Is this what it originally looked like ?



An American Victorian rendering of an Italian villa, the house was designed by Otis E. Wheelock of Chicago. The style, which became popular in this country during the 1840s and 1850s, is sometimes called American Bracketed because of the ornamentation at the cornice.

The house was built between 1862 and 1865 by James C. Burbank, a Vermont-born pioneer who came to Minnesota in 1850. Burbank was a significant figure in early Minnesota transportation, controlling a large part of stage-coach and riverboat traffic in the 1860s. Burbank died in 1876, leaving the house to his widow, who resided in the house until 1884.

Between 1884 and 1887 two families owned the mansion.

George R. Finch, a partner of St. Paul's largest dry-goods firm, lived there in 1885; and Thomas F. Cakes, builder of the Northern Pacific main line under Villard and president of the Northern Pacific Railroad from 1888 to 1893, made his home at the fashionable suburban home between 1885 and 1887.

Crawford Livingston acquired the property in 1887 and Livingstons have lived there since. Crawford Livingston came to St. Paul in 1870 and gained wealth as a banker, stock broker, and railroad builder. He and his wife, Mary Potts, a niece of Henry H. Sibley, lived at 432 Summit Avenue until their deaths in 1925, when the house passed to one of their five children, Mary Livingston Griggs.

Theodore Griggs was the descendant of a Civil War colonel and a prominent entrepreneur. In the late 1920s, Mary Livingston Griggs undertook extensive alterations to the house-the first major changes since construction. Mrs. Griggs added a new wing, designed by a St. Paul architect, A. H. Stem, who also remodeled the stone room. The new wing included kitchen facilities on the first floor and a bedroom above. In the early 1930s the project for installation of European period rooms was carried out by architect Edwin Lundie of St. Paul.

With Mrs. Griggs death in 1967 the property passed to her daughter, Mrs Jackson Burke, who has donated the property to the people of Minnesota in care of the Minnesota Historical Society and the St. Paul Junior League.
James C. Burbank House (Livingston-Griggs House), St. Paul Minnesota

And here she is today.


Griggs Mansion - HauntedHouses.com

In 1883, a wealthy wholesale grocery businessman, Chauncey Griggs, built this lovely mansion, but lived in it for only four years, before moving onto greener pastures on the West coast, where he expanded his business interests to include the lumber and transportation markets. Over its 100+ years, the mansion has been a private residence, and at one time was divided into apartment units as well. Many families/ individuals, who moved in, spent a lot of money on upkeep, furnishings, servants, etc., but wound up leaving after only a few years.

Also, as mentioned above, the mansion became an art school in 1939, and stayed there for 25 years, until the new Arts and Sciences Center was built. Many students and teachers were glad that the new building was built, because now they didn't have to share their school with seen and unseen presences.


Well i don't really know what to believe of its original history who built it or who lived in it, all the reports are different, dates are different, Its really confusing.


Love and harmony
Whateva



posted on Sep, 24 2012 @ 11:26 PM
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Originally posted by Whateva69
Oh its absolutely beautiful.

Is this the same house ? Is this what it originally looked like ?



An American Victorian rendering of an Italian villa, the house was designed by Otis E. Wheelock of Chicago. The style, which became popular in this country during the 1840s and 1850s, is sometimes called American Bracketed because of the ornamentation at the cornice.

The house was built between 1862 and 1865 by James C. Burbank, a Vermont-born pioneer who came to Minnesota in 1850. Burbank was a significant figure in early Minnesota transportation, controlling a large part of stage-coach and riverboat traffic in the 1860s. Burbank died in 1876, leaving the house to his widow, who resided in the house until 1884.

Between 1884 and 1887 two families owned the mansion.

George R. Finch, a partner of St. Paul's largest dry-goods firm, lived there in 1885; and Thomas F. Cakes, builder of the Northern Pacific main line under Villard and president of the Northern Pacific Railroad from 1888 to 1893, made his home at the fashionable suburban home between 1885 and 1887.

Crawford Livingston acquired the property in 1887 and Livingstons have lived there since. Crawford Livingston came to St. Paul in 1870 and gained wealth as a banker, stock broker, and railroad builder. He and his wife, Mary Potts, a niece of Henry H. Sibley, lived at 432 Summit Avenue until their deaths in 1925, when the house passed to one of their five children, Mary Livingston Griggs.

Theodore Griggs was the descendant of a Civil War colonel and a prominent entrepreneur. In the late 1920s, Mary Livingston Griggs undertook extensive alterations to the house-the first major changes since construction. Mrs. Griggs added a new wing, designed by a St. Paul architect, A. H. Stem, who also remodeled the stone room. The new wing included kitchen facilities on the first floor and a bedroom above. In the early 1930s the project for installation of European period rooms was carried out by architect Edwin Lundie of St. Paul.

With Mrs. Griggs death in 1967 the property passed to her daughter, Mrs Jackson Burke, who has donated the property to the people of Minnesota in care of the Minnesota Historical Society and the St. Paul Junior League.
James C. Burbank House (Livingston-Griggs House), St. Paul Minnesota

And here she is today.


Griggs Mansion - HauntedHouses.com

In 1883, a wealthy wholesale grocery businessman, Chauncey Griggs, built this lovely mansion, but lived in it for only four years, before moving onto greener pastures on the West coast, where he expanded his business interests to include the lumber and transportation markets. Over its 100+ years, the mansion has been a private residence, and at one time was divided into apartment units as well. Many families/ individuals, who moved in, spent a lot of money on upkeep, furnishings, servants, etc., but wound up leaving after only a few years.

Also, as mentioned above, the mansion became an art school in 1939, and stayed there for 25 years, until the new Arts and Sciences Center was built. Many students and teachers were glad that the new building was built, because now they didn't have to share their school with seen and unseen presences.


Well i don't really know what to believe of its original history who built it or who lived in it, all the reports are different, dates are different, Its really confusing.


Love and harmony
Whateva


It looks to me like those are two completely different homes. the Griggs Mansion was built in 1833 by Chauncey Griggs and the other was built between 1862-1965 by James C. Burbank...



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 12:07 AM
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reply to post by Menrva
 

I think your correct

"Theodore Griggs was the descendant of a Civil War colonel and a prominent entrepreneur".

i buggered up thanks for sorting me out.


love and harmony
Whateva



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 08:57 AM
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House number two makes me think of the Munsters or Addams Family.

The original one that is written up in the Daily Mail is written up in DM's typical woefully incomplete style. They never say for example, what scared the reporters out of their overnight stay. The article only really describes the maid and the gardener and one male ghost who might be the original owner. They also say that the site of the maid's death is one filled with spooky premonitions. I think they meant to say "apparitions".

Nevermind the ghosts, just the work of having to keep that house clean is enough to drive me screaming from the grounds. No wonder the poor maid killed herself. Even if she were one of a huge staff, it must have been a lot of work to maintain that house.

If that dreamcatcher over the bed in one of the photos was put there by a former occupant for a reason, that is warning enough for me. I've had to do the same in the house I own now, which is no treat. My house has had cold spots and shadow beings and all kinds of creepy happenings in it. Though I admit some of the problems might have been imported when I brought over a problematic bed that had given bad dreams to our family for two generations. Even so, my mom said she felt something watching her when she helped us move in. Yet it's a modern pleasant suburban house with sunlight and cheery neighbors all around us and only one previous owner, a nice couple who raised five lovely children here with lots of love. Still, I have had to do a lot of cleansing work on it. I do wonder if one of the children messed around with an ouija board here. Or if there was some bad event associated with a very unusual set of subfloor wood that we removed that did not match the rest of the boards. That spot where the wood was found used to be the source of disquiet that bothered me and a visitor's dog.

If I've run into this much trouble with a nice modern house with an excellent history, no way am I going to take on an old relic of that huge size that has a long history of occupants staying only a few short years. Even if they weren't being haunted, that tells me that the house just doesn't feel like a home that one wants to grow old in or raise a family in. Also...being surrounded by all that heavy stone is interesting. I wonder what a very well versed feng shui practitioner would have to say about this huge stone house.



posted on Sep, 25 2012 @ 01:36 PM
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reply to post by Whateva69
 


Sure does look like the place some of the same type structure, there could've been other additions to the house in all this time, look at what people do when they just add on a room. The house I grew up in was old(not haunted) and they changed it from a single family to a flat, I guess anything can be done.
Some good research. Part of me is torn on this. If it's as haunted as they say it is and I were trying to sell the I might try exorcism or a good smudging. But then that would detract from the interest. Glad I'll never have to worry about what to do, with it, all though I do like old houses.
edit on 25-9-2012 by 1loserel2 because: add



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 02:28 PM
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reply to post by Whateva69
 


Not a prob'! lol. Although both homes are quite lovely in their own way...



posted on Sep, 26 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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I've always wanted to visit a haunted house. I lived in a haunted apartment building many years ago before I started to become more "aware" and even back then, we knew it was haunted.

That one is almost close enough to me to go visit. lol



God I love fall/Halloween!
It always brings out the haunted house stories and all of the spooky interests.





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