Planet X complex captured on video Sept 21, 2012 11:00 UTC?

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posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


It is documented that something like 14 ancient civilizations had a 360 day calendar, and the solar year is something that it is not that hard to calculate using basic astronomy and the solstices. So.........either all these ancient civilizations were incredibly incompetent - yet some of them gave us sophisticated science and math OR the Earth used to be actually closer to the Sun with a shorter duration orbit and was pulled into a slightly further out orbit to give us the current 365 1/4 day orbit - and a Planet X passage nicely explains this, though I concede this is not the only possibility.

Ancient civilizations with 360 day calendars

Please don't say the 360 calendar was a lunar calendar - the full moon is once every 29.5 days, which gives me a 354 day calendar.

It's funny how this is true, all the old 360 day calendars, but it is so hard to find info on it. Almost as if they didn't want people to dig too deeply into this. I'll have to remember to add this to my list for my super duper Planet X thread which will be upcoming.

edit on 2-10-2012 by PlanetXisHERE because: insertion
edit on 2-10-2012 by PlanetXisHERE because: addition




posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 07:24 PM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 


The only calendar on that list I'm comfortable in discussing is the Mayan. I can however say 100% positively that the Mayan solar calendar (the haab) was 365 days long. They had 13 months of 20 days based around planting, harvesting, etc. Then at the end of the year they had five "unnamed" days. So if that site was wrong on this account it makes me wonder if they were wrong about the other calendars. I'll do a little research and see if I can't turn up that information.



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 08:25 PM
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reply to post by Xcalibur254
 


Ok, I've one through the list they had and as I thought most of their claims are wrong. Out of all of those only the Persian Calendar is 360 days long but they added a month every few years to keep their calendar correlated to the solar cycle.

Assyrian Calendar: 5 months of 31 days + 6 months of 30 days + 1 month of 29 days = 364 days

Babylonian Calendar: Lunisolar Calendar. 354 days a year but in order to keep up with the solar cycle an intercalary month would be added every few years.

Chinese Calendar: Lunar calendar that alternated between 12 months of 30 days and 12 months of 29 days. This gives an average of 354 days.

Egyptian Calendar: 12 months of 30 days with five days added at the end of the year.

Ethiopian Calendar: Based on the Egyptian calendar but adds a leap day every four years.

Greek Calendar: Lunisolar Calendar. 354 days a year but in order to keep up with the solar cycle an intercalary month would be added every three years.

Hindu Calendar: This one is a bit complicated to understand on a quick perusal but it appears to be another lunisolar calendar.

Hebrew Calendar: Another lunisolar calendar. This one was based on a 19-year cycle of 235 lunar months with seven intercalary months added throughout the cycle.

Japanese Calendar: Based on the Chinese calendar.

Persian Calendar: This one actually was 360 days long. This stems from taking the Babylonian calendar and then adapting it to reflect their beliefs. To ensure the months stayed corresponded to the seasons an extra month was added every six years.

Pre-Incan Calendar: There were a number of civilization in Peru prior to the Inca. So until I know which one specifically I don't know what to search for.

Roman Calendar: These are kind of weird. Before the Julian Calendar they had two other calendars. The first was the Romulus Calendar. This was a lunar calendar but it was only 304 days long. For whatever reason the days between December and Martius were not given a month. This was followed by the Numa Calendar. This took the Romulus Calendar and then defined those interceding months. This led to a 355 day calendar. In order to keep up with the solar cycle intercalary months were occasionally added.
edit on 10/2/2012 by Xcalibur254 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2012 @ 09:03 PM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 


I see Xcalibur already replied with some good information, but I'll add to it.

It's true that many ancient civilizations had a 360 day calendar. It's also true that many civilizations had calendar lengths that were not 360 either.

However, before you can point to that and say: "this proves that the Earth had a shorter year, meaning it's orbit around the sun was closer, therefore a celestial body must have passed by the Earth and changed it's orbital period to what it is today, which is 365.25 days.", you have to look at those ancient calendars and see what exactly did their calender entail:

Did they add days? Subtract days? Add weeks? Add months?

All one has to do is look at the western calendar that we go by in today's world: Normally your calendar hanging on your wall has 12 months, and 365 days. Some months have 30 days, some have 31, and one month has 28 days in it, equating to 365 days.
But, every 4 years, we have a calendar that has 366 days in it, and a month that suddenly has an extra day.

Now ask yourself this: What if we had a calendar system today that makes it to where we have exactly 365.25 days every year? There would be no leap years for us, and if it was a system that we adopted over 1,000 years or more ago, any other system would seem strange to us. We are used to our 365.25 day calendar, and anything else would be quaint.

Now here you are doing research and you find out that several thousands of years ago, calendars used by several ancient civilizations, and it was 365 days! It's missing that 0.25 of a day!
Does that automatically prove that the Earth must have orbited the sun 365 days way back then, and some orbiting body must have passed close by the Earth and shortened it's orbit to 365.25 days that we have now!

Ah, but further investigation by archeologists, historians and scholars find that they also had a 366 day calendar that was used once every 4 years to make up for that missing 0.25 of a day.

Will you ignore those findings and insist that they are all wrong? That they can't be right? That the Earth MUST of had a shorter orbit? That a body just had to of changed it?

This is where you need to be careful. Ancient people's using different calendar systems is not proof of anything, except that humans love to mess with their calendar. Just look at the Romans on that one.

Here's a link that talks about several ancient calendars in detail:

Other Ancient Calendars

If you could show that many historians have shown that all those ancient civilizations used the same calendar, and that they all changed that calendar at the same time, that would be a good indication that there was something else going on. But I'm afraid you'll find that humans changed their calendars all the time, at different times, under different rulers.

edit on 2-10-2012 by eriktheawful because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 03:33 PM
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What does calendar creation have to do with anything?


If I suddenly create a new calendar with a mysterious cut-off date some 3,000 years in the future, how does that mean anything? It doesn't. I am unable to read future events.. any more than people who created any calendar in the past was able to. It means NOTHING. That people would jump to such incredible conclusions based on the ending date of a calendar still blows my mind.



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 03:55 PM
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Originally posted by fleabit
What does calendar creation have to do with anything?


If I suddenly create a new calendar with a mysterious cut-off date some 3,000 years in the future, how does that mean anything? It doesn't. I am unable to read future events.. any more than people who created any calendar in the past was able to. It means NOTHING. That people would jump to such incredible conclusions based on the ending date of a calendar still blows my mind.


Some of the ancient civilizations were highly intelligent and laid the foundation today for some of our knowledge in science in math. Follow?

Counting the length of one year using the solstices would be relatively simple. Follow?

So they could calculate the number of days it took for Earth to make one revolution around the Sun. Follow?

Many calculated the length of one year's orbit around the Sun to be 360 days, and used a 360 day calendar. Follow?

That wasn't a lunar calculation, since the full moon happens every 29.5 days which would have given a year of 354 days. Follow?

However, our trip around the Sun now takes 365 1/4 days. Follow?

That implies the Earth has a further out orbit than when the 360 day calendars were in use. Follow?

So how did the Earth move further out from the Sun?

Well it could have been a massive comet/meteorite impact, but we have no evidence of such a large event 3000 years ago or so.

Another is a pass of some celestial body passing by the Earth and pulling/nudging Earth into a further out orbit with it's gravitational and/or magnetic influence.

It's just a theory and I'm open to other ones. I'm using logic, I don't know what thought processes you are using. Since when does logic blow ones mind?
edit on 6-10-2012 by PlanetXisHERE because: addition



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 



Some of the ancient civilizations were highly intelligent and laid the foundation today for some of our knowledge in science in math. Follow?


Correct.


Counting the length of one year using the solstices would be relatively simple. Follow?


Correct.


So they could calculate the number of days it took for Earth to make one revolution around the Sun. Follow?


Correct. They counted 365 days, but that caused the calendar to drift by nearly a month every hundred years.


Many calculated the length of one year's orbit around the Sun to be 360 days, and used a 360 day calendar. Follow?


Close. They counted a 365 day year, then rounded down to 360. 360 is divisible by 2, 3, 4, 6, 12, 15, 18, 20, 30 and 60. Notice the resemblance to angular measurements: 360 degrees in a circle, each zodiacal constellation is 30 degrees wide. There are twice twelve (24) hours in a day, twelve months in a year. 365 is really only divisible by 5.


That wasn't a lunar calculation, since the full moon happens every 29.5 days which would have given a year of 354 days. Follow?


You have introduced the next level of complexity: the lunar and solar years don't align. Because it is easier to spot the new or full Moon, most societies started out with a lunar calendar. They would then introduce 10 or 11 holidays to bring the calendars into sync.


However, our trip around the Sun now takes 365 1/4 days. Follow?


As it did 5,000 years ago.


That implies the Earth has a further out orbit than when the 360 day calendars were in use. Follow?


No, it doesn't.



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by PlanetXisHERE
 


Really? You going to continue to spout the claim that a bunch of civilizations had 360 day calendars when just a couple of posts above me and Erik explained to you this was false? You know for a while there I thought you might actually be interested in finding the truth but this shows you're just another person willing to ignore the facts if they don't mesh with your worldview.



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 06:50 PM
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Originally posted by PlanetXisHERE

However, our trip around the Sun now takes 365 1/4 days. Follow?

That implies the Earth has a further out orbit than when the 360 day calendars were in use. Follow?

So how did the Earth move further out from the Sun?



See, the problem here is, you've made an assumption, and tried to make it into a fact. Which is:

"Because some civilizations used a 360 day calendar (never mind that they would shift and add days), it MUST mean that Earth's orbit around the sun was shorter."

Then you jump to your question: "So how did the Earth move further out from the sun?"

It would be much better if you actually used the Scientific Method:

1) Ask a question: "Is it possible that the Earth may have had a shorter period orbit during our recorded history of the last 3,000 years (give or take a several centuries)?"

2) Do research to find if there is any supporting evidence that the Earth may have had a shorter year.

A) This research can not be based simply on one piece of evidence.
B) Evidence that is looked at, must be completely looked at, even if it may detract from supporting you.

3) You've found evidence that some ancient peoples had a 360 day calendar. Does this evidence have any detractors from it?
A) Yes. They would adjust by 5 days. Why would they adjust if they had a 360 day calendar that matches the progression of the sun completely?

3a) Look for other evidence: What about the other inner planets? What are their orbital periods? Are the exact and even like the 360 day calendar I'm thinking of for Earth?

A) The answer is: No.

1) Mercury: Orbital Period = 87.969 days
2) Venus: Orbital period = 224.698 days
3) Mars: Orbital Period = 686.971 days

3b) The outer planets?

A) The answer is: No.

1) Jupiter: Orbital Period = 4,332.59 days
2) Saturn: Orbital Period = 10,759.22 days

(normally would not include Uranus or Neptune, as they would need telescopes to see them, but for the sake of data, I'll include them too: 30,799.095 and 60,190.03 days, respectively).
(also, by the way, the Earth's year is not exactly 365.25 days right now, it's actually: 365.256363004 days)

3c) Is it possible that because all the planets in our system have non perfect days (IE perfect meaning no fractions of a days in it's period), that something disturbed them all?

A) That might be a possibility, however, we can look at over 800 Extra Solar planets that orbit other stars now.....like Kepler 22b which has a orbital period around it's star of 289.9 days.......or Gliese 876e which has a orbital period of 124.26 days (both planets I picked at random). Seems like the universe as we know it doesn't like to make planets orbit their stars with exact numbers.....

4) What about the Earth's climate? A shorter orbit would affect the Earth's average temps, correct?

A) Yes it would. Right now the Earth has a average temprature of 12.6 C to 18.3 C. A 360 day year would bring the Earth around 2 million kilometers closer to the sun, and the average temps would rise to 14.0 C to 19.6 C.
B) However, the the temperature records shows that during the time period you're looking at, the Earth underwent a warming trend.....not a cooling trend as being moved away from the sun, and a longer calendar would show. You can take a look at the data yourself, for the Holocene Climatic Optimum

Conclusion: The evidence that the Earth was closer to the sun some time in the recent past is not supportive of that assumption.
1) There is no observable evidence from other planets that the Earth should have a exact, whole day calendar.
2) While some ancient people used a whole day calendar, there is no evidence that all used this, and there is evidence that those who did use one, modified their whole day calender to make up for the faction day period.
3) Climate records of the period in question do not support that the Earth was closer to the sun and cooled some by moving away. In fact the record shows that the Earth underwent some warming (and should be noted that the Earth's temps are caused by many factors having nothing to do with it's orbital period).

That is how you should be investigating something. Instead, the method you are using works more like this:

"There are people on the Earth that celebrate Christmas......therefore everyone on the Earth must be a christian."

Don't make assumptions. They always come back to bite you.



posted on Oct, 6 2012 @ 09:47 PM
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Please correct me if I am wrong but don't we lose about 2 seconds of spin every 2000 years or so? If you factor in that spin then our days have (admittedly) gotten longer by about... 4 seconds in the past 4000 years.

Where does that become 5 whole days?

Seriously I'm confused math is not my strong point...



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 06:29 AM
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Originally posted by vkey08
Please correct me if I am wrong but don't we lose about 2 seconds of spin every 2000 years or so? If you factor in that spin then our days have (admittedly) gotten longer by about... 4 seconds in the past 4000 years.

Where does that become 5 whole days?

Seriously I'm confused math is not my strong point...


Your confusion comes from thinking "Orbital Period" (the Earth orbiting around the sun), with "Axial Spin" (the Earth spinning on it's axis). The first one makes our year. The 2nd one makes our day.



posted on Oct, 7 2012 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Gracias.. yes that's the sticking point
thank you..





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