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Nestlé is watching you!

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posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 05:21 AM
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Originally posted by ThirdEyeofHorus
You could start by taking your own advice....just a thought.


Without being able to say what it is I have made up, you know this is a lie too, right?
What did I make up again?
Right, nothing.
Keep lying about obvious things if you think it is helping you.




posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 05:24 AM
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Originally posted by Char-Lee
Sorrrrry thought you might have a sense of humor.....
My Mistake.
edit on 22-9-2012 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)


OK, here is the deal. I do not know you. I cannot hear your tone of voice. If you are joking, the only way to tell is by the content of your post. Have you noticed all the crazy I am responding too? Your post fit right in. I would like to apologize for not getting your joke but if you cannot read this thread and see why your post looked serious then I guess you should apologize for not being more funny.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 05:39 AM
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Originally posted by ThirdEyeofHorus
You got a problem with DeVry?


I have a problem with anyone with greater access being so lazy as to just go to the closest or easiest source.

oh it's not Harvard. Snobbery will get you nowhere. You sound like all the other snobs who devalued Sarah Palin for attending different schools to get her degree.


No one ever made fun of Sarah just for going to different schools.
The fact that it took her 3 schools AND 6 YEARS to get an extremely low level 2 year degree.
I would think a smart person would have understood that.
Odd with your bragging.



It's a good technical school.


I know it is great. It is in the top 1000 and everything.


Well how about taking a stab at debunking the whole rfid thing? Let's see your arguments for or against? For instance, why don't you wow us with your knowledge of how many MHz a typical rfid chip will operate on? No fair peeking at Google.




So you asked me a question that can be easily looked up on google to pretend you know more than me?
How do we know you are not using google?
It is ok. You certainly know more about this than me. My mechanic knows more about my car than me.
Society needs monkeys that can memorize numbers and do assembly work. I do not devalue you. I just appreciate what my 4 year degrees at a real university afforded me - an intellectually stimulating career that pays well enough to hire a mechanic or an "RFID expert" such as yourself.


Other than that, I think you have zero technical knowledge of the subject. If you do, let's have it.
edit on 22-9-2012 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)


For some reason I value critical thinking over number memorizing but that is just me. As far as going to a technical school and remembering a number, I can concede you beat me there.

So when you ever get around to pointing out what this has to do with this thread, this might be interesting. I have no idea what your point actually is.
Would googling the correct Mhz explain to me why I should be afraid of a chocolate wrapper I will never have?



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 05:45 AM
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Originally posted by ThirdEyeofHorus
reply to post by wascurious
 


I'm waiting. You should already have your technical reply posted.


Ummm....

You waited 3 minutes. I was reading other threads, talking on the phone, having a meal, doing other things. Did you think I was sitting on this page refreshing it constantly in hopes of hearing back from you?




I see you still have not posted your technical response. I am inclined to think that whereas you have ridiculed me and ridiculed a technical school but have not been able to even post on this subject in the most remotely technical manner, I will consider that you may not have any knowledge of the subject at all but are merely posting fluff and looking for people to insult.


What technical things are required from me in this thread? What is it you want to hear from me from a technical perspective to validate anything else I have said on the topic. Believe me, I am smart enough to go learn what I need to learn to make you happy about this. Unfortunately I doubt very much you can come up with any relevance.

NOW I AM WAITING. YOU HAVE 3 MINUTES TO RESPOND BEFORE I RIDICULE YOU FOR NOT RESPONDING.



Well, that's the end of it then. You stayed just long enough to hit me over the head with a two by four and likely you have moved on to the next thread where you will hit someone else with a hit and run comment.


Quite the victim mentality. How would I even accomplish that if you have not said anything stupid? If you are smarter and more versed on the topic then I, then obviously the head smashing would be on me. Why is it that instead you are crying about how I beat you?

I offered my opinions on the topic. If you felt outsmarted then that is your issue.



Good work man, good work...




edit on 22-9-2012 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-9-2012 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-9-2012 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)


It is Mam and I know.
Debunking lies and paranoid bull# is one thing I do well.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 05:50 AM
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Originally posted by ThirdEyeofHorus
reply to post by SheopleNation
 


You of all people would support this Orwellian nightmare? You think it is justifiable to start implanting chips in people? It starts out with a voluntary thing, then somehow everyone is being forced, just like Obamacare. It's part of the One World Totalitarian agenda.
You are willingly submitting to Big Brother because you think it's a superior way for parents to keep track of kids?


Chill out and do not buy a candy bar.
It is really that easy to not get a chip from Nestle. Do not buy any of those bars.
This is where critical thinking I guess trumps memorizing numbers.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 06:20 AM
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You can simply avoid pulp fiction if you are truly concerned that your RFID chip is being programmed nefariously.
This is truly a relative issue anyways think "Like Water for Chocolate".
The Scientologists hold a lot of patents on these issues and they will put you in a meat suit if you infringe.
Has nothing to do with Nestle or their chocolate its about the water short circuiting your RFID chip.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 06:48 AM
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Beware of all M&M's.



Originally posted by lillebror
Hi there..
Im new here, and this is the only forum im allowed to post my findings in atm. So i hope someone will read it here since i think its of importance..
Here goes:

I just stumbled upon a little article that i think i should share with you guys. It would be interesting to know if its just me seeing things that actually are not there or if there really is more to the story than they let us know.. Anyway, Nestlé is pushing for their new campaing called "We Will Find You". The commercial can be seen here:
Nestlé 'We Will Find You'

The campaing can be easily described like this: Buy one of the chocolate bars that has an GPS chip embedded in the wrapping. When the wrapping is opened the GPS chip is activated and if you are the lucky winner Nestlé will find you within 24 hours and give you a cash prize of £10,000. Heres an article about the campaign

So they will put a GPS chip in the paper of a chocolate bar just to find some lucky guy/girl and give them the money? Personally i dont think its that simple. I have a bad feeling that they are going to use the GPS thing in some more sinister way.

I did some research on the Nestlé company, and i wasn't very surprised when i found out that the chairmain and former CEO Peter Brabeck-Lethmate en.wikipedia.org... could be found on the list of attendees at the Bilderberg meetings
(source: truthquake.com... ).

So if what some people say about the Bilderbergs are true (im thinking of the de-population of the earth thing here), then things are getting a bit scary. Could it be that they put something in the chocolate that makes us sick in someway and want the GPS thing to be able to track who and which parts of the country that have gotten "infected"? Nestlé have been trying to kill of poor people in Africa before by selling bad breast milk substitute since the early '70s. You can read more about that here:
en.wikipedia.org...

What do you guys think of this? Is it just me that is being paranoid or is there really something to look out for here? I wont be buying any Nestlé chocolate bars again, thats for sure.

And, btw, this is my first real post here and english is not my first language so if i have done any mistakes or broken any posting rules...sorry



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 07:18 AM
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I'm having a bit of trouble understanding how a half dozen GPS units equate to "Nestle is watching you".
Maybe I'm just slow...



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 09:06 AM
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Originally posted by On the Edge
reply to post by lillebror
 


It is important. It shows how easily people will go along with the whole tracking and chipping program and how to get them used to it.

And using chocolate,too!


Have they no shame? Is nothing sacred?


But that video....yep,they're telling us just how easy it will be to sweep down on us. I would deliberately not buy those candy bars ever again on account of it!
edit on 21-9-2012 by On the Edge because: (no reason given)


^^this...is why I think it is important as well. Flag for the OP for bringing it up. Not that I know anything for certain, but I think you locked on to something, just a little bit off in what the purpose of it is. But that's why we come here to discuss, right? You presented it, and knowing how things operate, others extrapolated it to what the nefarious side probably is. A demonstration. Clever marketing, cheap advertising, yes, but almost certainly a demonstration - not a test, that could be done easily and quietly. Also, a desensitizer to the idea.

Well done OP, and to OntheEdge. Stars and a flag. Also to whoever (can't see it now til I post this) pointed out that without the prize people just throw the wrappers out. That piece as well pointed out that a little something was missing with the theory. Good job guys, this is ATS in action!



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 10:37 AM
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reply to post by Char-Lee
 



Then why does it say...

" six chocolate bars will have a GPS chip hidden inside the wrapper; when the wrapper is taken off the bar, it will activate the chip"?


I think when they say "inside the wrapper" they mean, like a candy bar is inside the wrapper, as opposed to being hidden in the wrapper lining itself..


here is a GPS Very small - 3.9cm*1.2cm*2.7cm Weight: only 23g
www.amazon.co.uk...

Wonder if their is even smaller. That is pretty tiny though.


That is small, but certainly not stealthy enough to hide in a wrapper lining.


Oh yeah they have the tiny tiny ones they put in pets.


That would be small enough, but I think you might be confusing GPS trackers with ID chips, The tiny ones they put under the pet's skin are ID chips. If your pet gets lost, someone has to take it someplace, like Animal Control or a vet, that scans pets for the ID chip. Then the ID can be linked up with the chip provider's database to reunite Fluffy with family.

There are external GPS collars for pets, but they are a bit bulky and have limited battery life.

This one is pretty cool... You can track you pet on a smartphone app.


Tagg Pet Tracker

So, with the information we have (so far) about this promotion, the fact that the device must send out information regarding it's location rather than being scanned at a predetermined location, leads me to believe that it must be something with some bulk that can't possibly go unnoticed by the customer, but rather is hidden in something the shape of a candy bar, so that customers won't know which ones have the devices. Once the wrapper is removed, then the battery life clock starts ticking.

I also have to assume there is some language printed on or with the device, indicating that the customer should not toss it in the trash and that 10,000 big ones are coming their way, along with contest rules, disclaimers, etc.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by wascurious

Originally posted by lillebror
Exactly what i was thinking at first.
BUT, if you know that your chocolate bar wrapper could be worth 10.000 pounds, wouldn't you keep it?


That is why I said, other than the promise of prize money. So how many people is this contest going to snare and what good is it going to be the day after the winner is announced? I am not buying a chocolate bar and carrying the wrapper with me just because I might win a prize but I am sure many will. Enough to pull of whatever Nestle's diabolical plan is? I guess that is possible but I am leaning toward not likely. I guess I was mostly aiming at the idea that this is conditioning or some grand long term plan. A few people who buy chocolate bars will remember to keep theirs for a little while and then throw them out. It still seems like a pretty weak plan to me.



It clearly says that they will find you within 24 hours so all you have to do is keep the wrapper for a day and then throw it out so no one is gonna be holding on to them for weeks. its a day and thats it.
And how do we know the chip isnt actually inside the chocolate?
They may have known people wouldnt remember and throw the wrapper away and the chip is actually in everyone and it latches to your insides before it gets dissolved in the stomach acid :L



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 11:33 AM
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Something you all might find a little more nefarious is the fact that Nestlé is doing a lot of research into how to manipulate the microbes in your guts. Is that to make you healthier when you eat their foods or to make you crave the foods they produce or...well, the list of options ends with your imagination, really. Nestlé has never been about anything but money, not for a very long time at least. They're also crossing generations now with extensive epigenetic research.

My boycott of Nestlé is longer than the majority of you all have been walking the planet. Join me.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 12:49 PM
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Originally posted by wascurious

Originally posted by Char-Lee
Sorrrrry thought you might have a sense of humor.....
My Mistake.
edit on 22-9-2012 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)


OK, here is the deal. I do not know you. I cannot hear your tone of voice. If you are joking, the only way to tell is by the content of your post. Have you noticed all the crazy I am responding too? Your post fit right in. I would like to apologize for not getting your joke but if you cannot read this thread and see why your post looked serious then I guess you should apologize for not being more funny.


Glad you have control of this thread...didn't realize you started it...gee really sorry I was not more funny.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 12:54 PM
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Originally posted by Zarniwoop
reply to post by Char-Lee
 



Then why does it say...

" six chocolate bars will have a GPS chip hidden inside the wrapper; when the wrapper is taken off the bar, it will activate the chip"?


I think when they say "inside the wrapper" they mean, like a candy bar is inside the wrapper, as opposed to being hidden in the wrapper lining itself..


here is a GPS Very small - 3.9cm*1.2cm*2.7cm Weight: only 23g
www.amazon.co.uk...

Wonder if their is even smaller. That is pretty tiny though.


That is small, but certainly not stealthy enough to hide in a wrapper lining.


Oh yeah they have the tiny tiny ones they put in pets.


That would be small enough, but I think you might be confusing GPS trackers with ID chips, The tiny ones they put under the pet's skin are ID chips. If your pet gets lost, someone has to take it someplace, like Animal Control or a vet, that scans pets for the ID chip. Then the ID can be linked up with the chip provider's database to reunite Fluffy with family.

There are external GPS collars for pets, but they are a bit bulky and have limited battery life.

This one is pretty cool... You can track you pet on a smartphone app.


Tagg Pet Tracker

So, with the information we have (so far) about this promotion, the fact that the device must send out information regarding it's location rather than being scanned at a predetermined location, leads me to believe that it must be something with some bulk that can't possibly go unnoticed by the customer, but rather is hidden in something the shape of a candy bar, so that customers won't know which ones have the devices. Once the wrapper is removed, then the battery life clock starts ticking.

I also have to assume there is some language printed on or with the device, indicating that the customer should not toss it in the trash and that 10,000 big ones are coming their way, along with contest rules, disclaimers, etc.



Could be, guess one way to find out, someone will have to get a picture of it. I tried to ask but the send was off som maybe they are flooded with ??'s!



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by lillebror
 


With the marketing strageties using spam, emails I think anything is possible. I hate spam.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 01:33 PM
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reply to post by lillebror
 


I have a feeling it's more like them easing us into acceptance of being tracked. You know, sort of like rewarding an animal for accepting your terms for it's behavior. Pretty soon, more and more products will have it and we'll anxiously await the next one.
As far as tracking, they can pretty much pinpoint every item to within a very small area by point of sale scanning.I'm not sure if they really need to track it to your house. They can already tell you bought it by your electronic transactions unless you buy it with cash. Just my opinion.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by wascurious
 

Did sdomeone pee in your wheaties last night?
Curious you were just plain rude to me instead of adding something to the conversation, instead you insulted me and a University which has awarded many students technical degrees. In my thinking it was probably not even worth the retort, but I wanted to see if your ridicule had any technical merit at all, which clearly it does not.
Maybe you are just a young kid, so it never occurred to you that people spend years and money working on a degree for which you spit on because you do not value the Institution because it does not measure up to your Ivy League Standards.
May I remind you that some of the most evil people came out of Harvard and Yale. Did you know that Bush and Kerry both graduated from Yale and were both members of Skull and Bones? And we all know that Obama is Harvard and Michelle is Princeton.
It's all in perspective I guess.
Now on topic, what ideas do you have regarding the Nestle rfid chip embedded in candy wrappers, which is being promoted to the general pubic as a kind of prize award? Or instead of insulting me, maybe you could check out the Spychips website or even read the book, and then comment about whether the rfid mayhem is of true value to society.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 02:14 PM
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Originally posted by wirefly
reply to post by lillebror
 


I have a feeling it's more like them easing us into acceptance of being tracked. You know, sort of like rewarding an animal for accepting your terms for it's behavior. Pretty soon, more and more products will have it and we'll anxiously await the next one.
As far as tracking, they can pretty much pinpoint every item to within a very small area by point of sale scanning.I'm not sure if they really need to track it to your house. They can already tell you bought it by your electronic transactions unless you buy it with cash. Just my opinion.


There has been a lot of opposition to the covert use of rfid in products, where people are not aware the chips are hidden in clothing or other products. They are tiny enough as not to be detected easily. More and more companies are using the technology. It is expensive though, and they have to justify it's use by the money they would save. I believe there is both a pragmatic approach to it, and a conspiratorial component likely not necessarily held by corporations themselves. There is a line where we cross over from using more advanced technology to help us, and using it in a way which becomes an invasive way to put us in some sort of prison. I even had to take a course in University where we discussed the ethical merits of technology, such as the genome project, and such things as would a corporation or a University which completed the sequencing and developed an application be considered a proprietary owner of such material, being that Universities and the National Institutes of Health are involved in researc. It is something to think about. Should said material be owned by a corporation and patented, or should it belong to the general public?


Celera initially announced that it would seek patent protection on "only 200–300" genes, but later amended this to seeking "intellectual property protection" on "fully-characterized important structures" amounting to 100–300 targets. The firm eventually filed preliminary ("place-holder") patent applications on 6,500 whole or partial genes. Celera also promised to publish their findings in accordance with the terms of the 1996 "Bermuda Statement," by releasing new data annually (the HGP released its new data daily), although, unlike the publicly funded project, they would not permit free redistribution or scientific use of the data.


en.wikipedia.org...

The OWS movement seems to be in moral outrage against the bankers and corporations in general, but where are they when Nestle is microchipping candy bars and promoting it with an monetary award? To be fair though, Adbusters which promoted the original Occupy Wall Street protest are in general anti-corporation. If they wanted to talk about something, they could talk about how people are being treated like cattle by corporations which use their personal information in their databases.



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Zarniwoop
 





I think when they say "inside the wrapper" they mean, like a candy bar is inside the wrapper, as opposed to being hidden in the wrapper lining itself..


I believe it would be a serious breach of ethics for the chip to come into contact with the inside of a person's gut, when it is suggested that the chip is embedded within the packaging, as that is generally where the chips are. A chip can be in a product package, or embedded within clothing or shoes(Nike does this for instance). Gillette was working with Wal Mart at one point, where the shelves where the Gillette product were housed literally took pictures of people who picked them up off the shelves. This drew a firestorm of response and people boycotted Wal Mart.
Being they are still testing chips to be sure there is no physical harm when it is embedded within the skin of a person or a pet, it would be highly unethical for this product to be promoted in such a manner.

Some bigger rfid apparatus appear in Cisco Engineering tech books which Barnes and Noble carries. I have seen these inside the cover of the books. You can see the antennea which is covered by a white plasticky material. They are flat and easily removed from the book.
edit on 22-9-2012 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 22 2012 @ 02:43 PM
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I thought it would be helpful for people to have a basic understanding of rfid components.


There are four different kinds of tags commonly in use. They are categorized by their radio frequency: Low frequency tags (between 125 to 134 kilohertz), High frequency tags (13.56 megahertz), UHF tags (868 to 956 megahertz), and Microwave tags (2.45 gigahertz). UHF tags cannot be used globally as there aren't any global regulations for their usage.


An RFID system may consist of several components: tags, tag readers, tag programming stations, circulation readers, sorting equipment, and tag inventory wands. Security can be handled in two ways. Security gates can query the ILS to determine its security status or the tag may contain a security bit which would be turned on and off by circulation or self-check reader stations.


The purpose of an RFID system is to enable data to be transmitted by a portable device, called a tag, which is read by an RFID reader and processed according to the needs of a particular application. The data transmitted by the tag may provide identification or location information, or specifics about the product tagged, such as price, color, date of purchase, etc. The use of RFID in tracking and access applications first appeared during the 1980s. RFID quickly gained attention because of its ability to track moving objects. As the technology is refined, more pervasive—and invasive—uses for RFID tags are in the works.


In a typical RFID system, individual objects are equipped with a small, inexpensive tag. The tag contains a transponder with a digital memory chip that is given a unique electronic product code. The interrogator, an antenna packaged with a transceiver and decoder, emits a signal activating the RFID tag so it can read and write data to it. When an RFID tag passes through the electromagnetic zone, it detects the reader's activation signal. The reader decodes the data encoded in the tag's integrated circuit (silicon chip) and the data is passed to the host computer for processing.

www.cisco-eagle.com...

So somehow, when the wrapper of said candy bar with rfid embedded is removed, it activates the gps signal contained within the chip. The chip likely then transmits data giving them the location of it, regardless of whether it was bought with cash or credit, as usually the rfid is read before the person ever leaves the store.



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