PLOS ONE paper on cassava gene enhancement retracted

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posted on Sep, 20 2012 @ 02:53 PM
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PLOS ONE paper on cassava gene enhancement retracted


phys.org

PLOS ONE, an open access peer review journal (launched in 2006) has issued a retraction regarding a paper it published recently touting the benefits of genetically enhanced cassava, saying that the results achieved by the research team could not be replicated and research materials used in the study could not be found.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.plosone.org

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Is medical science built on shaky foundations?




posted on Sep, 20 2012 @ 02:53 PM
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Recently, I had authored a thread which discussed an alarming (at least to me) assertion; namely that:

"More than half of biomedical findings cannot be reproduced."

This article demonstrates what the consequences of the 'expedient research result' has.

Researchers attempted to make Cassava (a kind of Yam) more nutritionally potent by manipulating it's genetic code.


As a part of that effort, a research team from the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, made up of members, Mohammad Abhary, Dimuth Siritunga, Gene Stevens, Nigel J. Taylor and Claude M. Fauquet submitted a paper to PLOS ONE which was subsequently published, which described a technique for genetically altering cassava causing it to express the zeolin gene, resulting in a nutritional protein being produced.


This, of course would have been yet another patent to be monopolized by the megalith corporations which need not be named (Pfizer, who owns Monsanto).

But...


Unfortunately, the results achieved by the team could not be reproduced in subsequent tests led by team member Fauquet, and worse, specimens produced in the original study, upon new examination were found to not have the zeolin gene after all.

The original research was led by Abhary who has subsequently left the Center and now it appears suspicion has arisen suggesting he might have falsified documents or duped his colleagues into believing research had been conducted that had not occurred....

...Abhary, who has also left the country, has not commented on the retraction or anything else since leaving the Center in the middle of last year, before suspicions arose.


I pray that this serves to sensitize the scientific community about the integrity of research and how we must get to the point where commercial or political influences don't hijack a search for knowledge, and twist it to their own use... which I fear has happened repeatedly in the past..

In the end, it is the public who pays the highest price for such tendencies among those who we have little choice but to trust implicitly.







phys.org
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 20-9-2012 by Maxmars because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2012 @ 03:00 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Pfizor owns Monsanto???? I am going to search for that connection and if you would, could you provide me with any link on this??

That is HUGE and thank you for bringing that to my attention!

EDIT Never mind, found lots of links! WOW! I never knew of those connections! Thank you!
edit on 20-9-2012 by seeker1963 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 20 2012 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by seeker1963
 


Yeah, when I became aware of the connection it became clear why Pfizer is so "into" Codex Alimentarium, as well as owning every major hospital they can.



posted on Sep, 20 2012 @ 07:39 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Cassava does resemble true yams a little bit. True yams, not sweet potatoes. It is however different, specially since the storage roots do not have propagation function i.e. they don't sprout. Probably because of this they spoil quickly at room temperature. Cassava has spread worldwide but is one of the few truly brazilian food species.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 09:25 AM
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Monsanto is owned by Pfizer?

I think my brain just exploded.

My introduction to the pharmaceutical research, development and approval process was almost twenty years ago when, as a recent college grad who couldn't find a job, I took a temp job at a very small pharmaceutical lab. I'd mention the lab name, but then I couldn't tell my story since I signed an NDA. My stimulating responsibility was one which consisted of photocopying procedural appraisals performed by a visiting FDA auditor. These reports were drafted on a per-drug trial basis, and ranged from forty to a hundred pages, give or take. I'd stand at a copier for a half-hour or more, making several copies, and reading their contents. "SOP Failure" was stamped every five pages or so (standard operating procedure). From barring study participants once negative side-effects emerged, to outright excluding test samples because they didn't support the drug's drive to market, the so-called "scientists" didn't seem to have any concern for any of the five steps of the scientific method, nor how the failure to meet even one standard of the method confounds all results. And despite what those reports concluded, two of those drugs saw the US marketplace within two years.


It would seem that an invisible, yet magical barrier exists between the well-educated and the others. As much as I'd love to blame the manipulators for this phenomenon, it was actually the unmotivated low men on the totem pole, wallowing in their own learned-helplessness, who elevated them. As usual, ignorance is to blame.

...and it's five hours to happy hour...



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 02:42 PM
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I remember that monsanto owned blackwater. I think the name has been changed now.
So possibly one of the largest drug companies owns one of the largest seed companies and the largest guns for hire companies.
Corporations are now superhuman.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 02:46 PM
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reply to post by deadeyedick
 


The new name is "Xe".... (pronounced Zee)

When the networks of ownership and control are all laid out I bet they all lead to a half-dozen people we've never heard of.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


No doubt they will hide their connections in a manner that doesn't warrant concern for most people.
It's gonna take some major change to fix our problems now.
I just can't understand why someone would try to make a yam more healthy. I believe yam's are considered a super food already.



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 03:14 PM
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Xe is outdated...

Blackwater -> Xe -> Academi

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academi
academi.com



posted on Sep, 21 2012 @ 03:16 PM
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Originally posted by wujotvowujotvowujotvo
Xe is outdated...

Blackwater -> Xe -> Academi

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academi
academi.com


Thank you.... I am behind the times....





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