Record breaking: 2 +100 mph wind storms in ALASKA, Anchorage

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posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 08:44 AM
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Wow, guys... Ive lived in Alaska my whole life (im only 17 though) but so has my dad and my mom and many other people I know. And NEVER before have any of them experienced +100 mph winds, let alone at least 60 mph winds. This is a VERY rare thing, and for it to happen twice in one year is almost unimaginable. We are "supposed to" never have any tornadoes or hurricanes in Alaska either.
Bottom line: This doesn't just happen, especially twice a year. In my opinion, something is coming (Which ive been aware of) aka a pole shift/hopefully planet x as well. And havent seen it yet, but once we start having these types of storms up here in Fairbanks (heart of Alaska) then you all will know the end is coming




posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 08:47 AM
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I believe you and don't mean to discredit anything your saying but i laughed out loud when i read "Hopefully Planet x"



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 08:56 AM
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Are you having one of those storms right now? Can you post a link to a story or weather report for this?
Thanks.



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 08:58 AM
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reply to post by jordanAKbramsen
 


I have to be honest enough to show my ignorance here but for me the surprising thing is that you don't get 100 MPH storms up there. I honestly thought you would get them every winter, due to location etc. You learn something new every day........



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by POPtheKlEEN89
 


well the way I see it is if were gonna go out, lets go with a show



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


13 days ago
www.accuweather.com...

1 day ago
www.ktva.com...
Earlier today I was on google reading the little 2 sentences on my results for my search and they had top speed recorded after the storm and they said it got to 130 somewhere in really high elev.



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 09:13 AM
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reply to post by Flavian
 


nope, thank god!
Thats one of the reasons I love alaska so much, so safe. Just gotta deal with the cold



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by jordanAKbramsen
Wow, guys... Ive lived in Alaska my whole life (im only 17 though) but so has my dad and my mom and many other people I know. And NEVER before have any of them experienced +100 mph winds, let alone at least 60 mph winds. This is a VERY rare thing, and for it to happen twice in one year is almost unimaginable. We are "supposed to" never have any tornadoes or hurricanes in Alaska either.
Bottom line: This doesn't just happen, especially twice a year. In my opinion, something is coming (Which ive been aware of) aka a pole shift/hopefully planet x as well. And havent seen it yet, but once we start having these types of storms up here in Fairbanks (heart of Alaska) then you all will know the end is coming


If its never happened before how do you even begin to consider this a sign of the end coming.

You say you and your family have never experienced even 60mph winds yet if you were to gather yourself and family members close together how much surface area would you cover? Now after working that out how much surface area has Alaska got? Unless you have a billion family members that can cover the whole area of Alaska then what they have and haven't experienced concerning weather matters isn't a sign of anything other than experiencing varying weather.
edit on 18-9-2012 by InhaleExhale because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by jordanAKbramsen
 


i heard about the storms by this guy
www.youtube.com...



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 10:00 AM
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Anchorage usually gets high winds in the middle of winter.....they're called Chinook Winds and they aren't usually that high of speed, the most we'll get is around 70 mph gusts....the alaskan version of a hurricane of sorts. Usually in December they'll come across and slam us with a warm front melting a good bit of snow in a flash thaw of sorts.

What makes this event different is the high winds and the time of year....been here for 20 years and have never seen anything like it. The Jet stream has been pushing well into Alaska for most of the summer and the last 10 months keeping much moisture away from the continental US west coast and neighboring states.

Alaska should be noted as the canary in the coal mine as it pertains to climate change...if its gonna happen...it'll happen north and south first....then trickle its way up to the equator. Much in the same way the magnetosphere moves.

The damage from these winds has been extensive.....I had to repair my fence due to the first one we had and many people were without power for 7 days due to tree falls and wind debris . Its also been raining like crazy here which is a little odd for this time of year as well. The ground is super saturated and this is adding to the high wind problem. Many drainages are flooding out.

Normally Alaska has robust weather anyway, and it takes a tough son of a botch to want to live here for any extended period of time. I must say however that as of last years record 138 inch snow fall (which its normally around 70 for the winter) the weather here is indeed strange and the fronts pushing through are by no means normal to what even the eskimos can remember...and they would know better than any of us.

The winds have been very persitant in the way that it has stranded many people in Anchorage due to the winds canceling flights and grounding ferries.

In Alaska we do things bigger....Example

And then theres This

As to whats causing it? Your guess is as good as any....but OP is correct....this is far from normal...and we should pay close attention.
edit on 18-9-2012 by Kastogere because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 10:04 AM
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reply to post by yospuig
 


From what I see things seem to be calming down for those in AK..

theweatherchannel

I really like the format or way the weather is being reported in this video...




posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 10:30 AM
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Originally posted by POPtheKlEEN89
I believe you and don't mean to discredit anything your saying but i laughed out loud when i read "Hopefully Planet x"


Oh too be 17 again.

Old enough to not care about the earth utter destrcution..
Not enough invested in it yet



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 10:49 AM
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Originally posted by jordanAKbramsen
Wow, guys... Ive lived in Alaska my whole life (im only 17 though) but so has my dad and my mom and many other people I know. And NEVER before have any of them experienced +100 mph winds, let alone at least 60 mph winds. This is a VERY rare thing, and for it to happen twice in one year is almost unimaginable. We are "supposed to" never have any tornadoes or hurricanes in Alaska either.
Bottom line: This doesn't just happen, especially twice a year. In my opinion, something is coming (Which ive been aware of) aka a pole shift/hopefully planet x as well. And havent seen it yet, but once we start having these types of storms up here in Fairbanks (heart of Alaska) then you all will know the end is coming


I don't mean to be disrespectful to your OP but i get the impression you are a bit "panicy"...You wont ever get a hurricane in Alaska because by the very definition its impossible. Only countries bordering the Atlantic can experience a Hurricane as a Hurricane only forms our of the Horn of Africa. In the Pacific, they are known as Typhoons.

Unfortunately these things "do just happen", if you understand the "fluid dynamics" of weather, and yes you need to think of the air as being like a fluid, you will understand why it is happening.

I really hate to burst your bubble but this is not caused by Planet X or a Pole Shift or Zee Germans or anything else fantastic.




The reason for the amazing intensity of some of the extra-tropical storms that swipe the Aleutians and the Bering Sea is that the low-pressure centers tap into relatively mild, moist sub-topical air off the coasts of Japan (sometimes the remnants of typhoons) and cold dry air centered over Eastern Siberia; somewhat in the same fashion that low pressure systems sometime ‘bomb out’ along the Eastern Seaboard of the United States after entraining, in their case, Gulf Stream moisture and Canadian cold, dry air

Amazing as the pressure readings observed during some Alaskan super storms, they still cannot quite compare (yet!) to the strongest low-pressure storms that form during the winter months in the North Atlantic.

In January 1993 a series of intense low-pressure systems passed near Scotland’s Shetland Islands and over the North Sea. On January 5th one such storm caused the super oil tanker Braer to be blown onto a rocky shoal on one the Shetland Islands. A stronger storm on January 10-11th caused the ship to break apart and release its contents resulting in a massive oil spill

One final comment. You will find that storms with NWS analyzed pressures of 948mb (or lower) occur quite frequently in the Gulf of Alaska. Must average at least 5 such storms every year, with 1 or 2 of them getting into the 930's. But these mega-storms attract little attention because there is no major affect on any populated areas (although aircraft landing in ANC can experience true, severe turbulence on approach through Turnagain Arm. I've never really had the time to check, but I suspect a careful analysis would show pressures in the 920's.


You parents and family may very well be true in thinking they have never experienced a strong storm, let alone 2, but because your small town doesnt get much wind, doesnt mean Alaska doesn't...because, well IT DOES and regularly...

Source



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by jordanAKbramsen
 

First, this:
nsidc.org...

Second, there have been lows near the north pole that have assisted the melting. This might also relate to the strong winds you've seen. The extra heat in the arctic helps to fuel them.

This is my opinion, btw.





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