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Yellowstone's supervolcano: Where is lava likely to erupt?

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posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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Yellowstone's supervolcano: Where is lava likely to erupt?


www.msnbc.msn.com

The currently dormant supervolcano at Yellowstone may erupt with lava flows in the future, and scientists are working to pinpoint where exactly this might happen.

Their findings may improve eruption forecasting in this vast area of volcanic unrest, the researchers said.

Supervolcanoes are capable of eruptions dwarfing anything ever recorded by humanity, spewing out thousands of times more magma and ash than even the catastrophic Krakatoa eruption of 1883.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.volcano-news.com

Related AboveTopSecret.com Discussion Threads:
Southern CA earthquakes, geysers, mud pots, mass fish kill, sulfur odors & water level drop!
Yellowstone 'Supervolcano' May Be Larger Than Previously Thought




posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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These new reports are just in on studies done at Yellowstone and it seems to be showing some ominous signs. Currently there are 26 volcanoes actively erupting around the world at this very moment. Live webcam views, interactive world maps and complete up to date status reports can be found at this link:
www.volcano-news.com...

With all the earthquake swarm activity over the last few weeks near the Salton Sea and recently reported sulfur smells emanating from all over southern California that really could not be pinpointed we need to keep an eye out and stay informed. Let’s just hope that all the activity ends up being nothing but at the same time we can’t completely dismiss it because it may be the only warning we get so stay informed.

www.msnbc.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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from what i understand of the Yellowstone super volcano, the answer to your question is : pretty much everywhere.



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:47 PM
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The Lava flow is meaningless. In that regard in a full eruption look at roughly a 500 Mile Diameter circle in which everyone dies actual lava flow wont extend that far but the explosion will leave that a dead zone, several feet of ash will fall in the surrounding states to the south and east Colorado, Utah, Nebraska south Dakota/Kansas depending on winds



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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And oh yeah

Then comes virtually all flights halted in the northern hemisphere for a good few months maybe and by then an ice age is settling in.



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 10:53 PM
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Originally posted by penninja
And oh yeah

Then comes virtually all flights halted in the northern hemisphere for a good few months maybe and by then an ice age is settling in.



That is not important. The Northern Hemisphere will be incapable of producing crops > Will lead to the mass die off of food animals > will lead to starvation on a biblical scale.

P



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 11:02 PM
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reply to post by meticulous
 


These should get you started...various bits of info for the Yellowstone Caldera

volcanoes.usgs.gov...

www.extremescience.com...

pubs.usgs.gov...

www.uusatrg.utah.edu...


By the by the "Net" is not just for posting whatever pops into your head or looking at pron.

It is in fact the largest repository of knowledge humans have had access to since the christians burned down the library of Alexandria.

I suggest you make use of that fact...Google It!



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 11:29 PM
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Originally posted by aethertek
reply to post by meticulous
 


These should get you started...various bits of info for the Yellowstone Caldera

volcanoes.usgs.gov...

www.extremescience.com...

pubs.usgs.gov...

www.uusatrg.utah.edu...


By the by the "Net" is not just for posting whatever pops into your head or looking at pron.

It is in fact the largest repository of knowledge humans have had access to since the christians burned down the library of Alexandria.

I suggest you make use of that fact...Google It!


The title was not posted as a question it’s a directly quoted news story title hence it was posted in breaking news. If you would have actually taken the time to read past the quoted headline ((or)) you could have just clicked the link in the OP and you would have figured that out in about five seconds. Go troll somewhere else

edit on 9/15/2012 by meticulous because: Aethertek needed schooling in reading comprehension 101



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by meticulous
 





Yellowstone's supervolcano: Where is lava likely to erupt?


Wouldn't bother with the MSN for such a technical subject & My comprehension is just fine since your thread title included the interrogative (?).

Whatever.



posted on Sep, 15 2012 @ 11:59 PM
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reply to post by meticulous
 

Yes this is a case of aethertek suggesting to read sources not following their own advice to read the source, and not understanding how breaking news titles work at ATS.


I guess both of you could have slightly better manners but I appreciate the story and understood it was a title of an article and not you asking a question. I particularly liked the plates in motion image which I hadn't seen before (with the red spots going back 16.5 million years):

I didn't realize they had traced the hotspot location that far back in time.

I also agree with penninja that for people interested in surviving the eruption, the lava flow is not as important as the ash fall.

However, penninja, I think the interest the scientists have in the lava flow is a scientific interest, so it matters to them, even if it's not that important to us compared to the ashfall.
edit on 16-9-2012 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Sep, 18 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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Realize there are two eruption types for Yellowstone. The one they speak of is the lesser form.

Minor eruptions (which have occurred as recently as 12,000 years, if i recall) are small flows that erupt in a location and spread within the park. This is the type you need to worry about for park-safety reasons only. It -can- but doesn't necessarily lead to...

Major eruptions are the ones you need to fear the most. The big boom.

This isn't like a zit. In fact, multiple small eruptions are preferable to a major eruption.



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