Whistleblower told to shut up

page: 1
21
<<   2 >>

log in

join

posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:26 PM
link   

Whistleblower told to shut up


www.smh.com.au

THE whistleblower who exposed alleged corruption in two Reserve Bank companies told five top bank officials of his explosive concerns, only to be forced out of his job and warned to keep quiet.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:26 PM
link   
The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) is Australia's Federal Reserve and this article shows that we're having issues with corruption in that arena, down in Australia too...no surprises really...when money is concerned at high levels, there'll nearly always be corruption.

Thought it might be interesting for other ATSers to see this happening in Australia too...it's not just the FED.

I'd be interested to find out about other central banks, are they lying or allegedly lying to their corresponding parliaments?

www.smh.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:34 PM
link   
reply to post by comfortablynumb
 


It's supposed to be against the law to victimize a whistleblower in America also, but it happens every day.

My wife was fired from her nursing job after reporting unsafe conditions to her supervisor.

We couldn't get any lawyers to take the case without $30,000 up front.
edit on 13-9-2012 by AGWskeptic because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:51 PM
link   
reply to post by comfortablynumb
 
First off: I know that these↓ are not your words, and you simply used the title of the article.


Whistleblower told to shut up

Now that being said,
I would just like to say:




Of course he was told to shut up. Wouldn't be a very good 'Whistleblower', if nobody wanted him to shut up. lol



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:54 PM
link   
reply to post by AGWskeptic
 


Yeah, I know what you mean mate. Years ago it was an employees market, in that you could get a job whenever you liked. You could leave one job on a Friday and be in a new on the next Monday.

Now? Now it's an employers market and they have all the power. They know it's hard to get work elsewhere, so you should just be happy where you are and if you don't like something, you best shut up. In fact, stress leave is only a new thing...why? I would say because it's such a dominant employer market that we, one, feel trapped, knowing it's so hard to get work elsewhere and two, get pushed so hard by employers with overloading of work and not to mention managers who really shouldn't be managers, making inane requests of their staff with the knowledge that it's so hard to get another job.

Though, good luck taking stress leave. With stress leave, just like whistleblowing, you're ostracised from there on in, and not just in your current job, but in future jobs.

We live in a sick world.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:56 PM
link   
reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


Yes...if you post a breaking news article, ATS makes you use the title of the article and paste an excerpt and then add some comments which get posted as a follow up post.

Go and try posting a breaking news story, you'll see what I mean



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 03:56 PM
link   
When it comes to "central" banks... they are all in the same hands.... it is not surprising that they are equally corrupt and dedicated to the same racketeering as the rest.

Isn't if funny that these people want to eventually run the planet openly? They can't even trust each other.


PS - Don't worry about the title... ATS is not a website for people who don't read and take the title as the summary of the thread. If you ever want to avoid the restriction just place the thread in a more topically focused forum and you can entitle it as you wish.
edit on 13-9-2012 by Maxmars because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 04:06 PM
link   
reply to post by Maxmars
 


That's just it, they can't trust each other because some people who get into banking have scruples and once it's shown that they're not a good team fit per se, they're shown the door. It's the same in the trading industry...in fact, it's in every industry; being right doesn't matter, fitting in is way more important


Thanks btw...I wasn't sure what forum this should have gone in, and being news, I thought, oh well...news


Take care



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 04:10 PM
link   

Originally posted by comfortablynumb

Yes...if you post a breaking news article, ATS makes you use the title of the article and paste an excerpt and then add some comments which get posted as a follow up post.
lol. Yes, I am aware of that. The reason I mentioned that was simply to clarify that the 'facepalm' wasn't directed at you.

It was directed towards whoever wrote the article, and gave it that title.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 04:17 PM
link   
reply to post by BrokenCircles
 


Ahhhhhhhh, my bad...yeah I reckon we could come up with better headlines. I once wanted to be a copywriter too


Again, sorry for jumping the gun mate.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 09:47 AM
link   
reply to post by comfortablynumb
 



The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) is Australia's Federal Reserve and this article shows that we're having issues with corruption in that arena, down in Australia too

You know this is a topic I've been wanting to discuss for some while now: what are the differences in monetary policy between the US central bank and the AU central bank in terms of money issuance? This is something which I haven't really read much about on ATS but I think there's some interesting things to look at here, and being from Australia it's relevant to me.

First of all I think it's interesting to note that the Australian dollar and the American dollar have been pretty much equal for around a decade. Sure the USD always seems to sit just above the AUD but that's not important. What's important here is long term changes and inflation. Official figures estimate that the US dollar experiences an inflation rate of about 2% per year.

Also keep in mind that the inflation rate will compound each year. If we assume an average rate of 2% inflation per year, we find that the US dollar has lost some where around 20% of its value in the last 10 years... which seems pretty correct if you consider the increase in prices over the last 10 years. Also remember that in the last 100 years the US dollar has lost some where around 98% of its value.

So why all this talk about the US dollar. Well this is kind of interesting if you remember that the AUD always seems to sit along side the USD. That means our currency is actually losing value at essentially the exact same rate as the USD, does it not? But are we printing the exact same amount of money (aka a # load)? I truly doubt our Government does print that much money. If it does: why?

And if we aren't matching the same levels of money printing (or other methods of creating new currency) then exactly what force might be forcing the AUD to latch onto the USD? I just don't seem to understand why our currency seems to so consistently mimic the behavior of the USD when there should be so many other factors causing them to drift a lot further apart a lot more often. At this point we may as well be using USD's.

Forgive my ignorance in this arena but I know nearly nothing about the Australian Central Bank. I actually know more about the United States Federal Reserve. A lot more.
edit on 14/9/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 12:13 PM
link   
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


A most excellent observation and question!


Truly, it might seem odd that nearly every country on the planet has legislated, or somehow 'adopted,' the notion that a central bank with a monopoly on interest rates and the creation of currency would be the fulcrum of monetary policy within their economies.

In each case, they are not accountable tot he populations they serve. That unaccountability was the cause for the "outrage" over Iceland "making" them accountable despite their government's acquiescence to the global banking cartel. each Central bank is not independent, as sovereignty of the nation might imply.

Instead the entire network is centrally controlled from the seat of the monopoly's power ... the Bank of International Settlement. Is it any wonder that as national economies collapse and falter across the globe ALL of these bankers and their associated "institutions" remain both solvent and profitable. Why? because they are in reality - a single Bank. Privately owned and operated, indemnified from any action they may take, protected by the governments they supposedly serve... and yet by any measure of logic, they are fully responsible for the monetary woes of every nation (save perhaps, North Korea, Cuba, and other such pronounced "axis of evil" type entities.)

It is a racket. From many perspectives it is morally criminal.

Since they are the gatekeepers of economic fluidity, and the "owners" of all debt (it is after all THEIR money) they have convinced the fearful sycophants running each nation that they (the politicians and "leaders" ) cannot maintain power to govern without their support.

Banking didn't have to be a racket. But it is. It is based on gambling, and the freedom to create wealth from nothing at their whim.... a perfect storm of opportunity to exploit.

I don't want to get technical or anything, but you may want to review the mechanics of "monetary policy" to see just how indirectly "absolute" their power to control the world is.

What was once seen as hyperbole has been proven true over the last century numerous times... the banks have the power to end poverty, hunger, and most wars... but that would mean less wealth and power for themselves. So they use words like "confidence in the market" and "market forces" to hide the fact that it is "profit-taking," the "transfer of wealth," and the maintenance of an elite supranational institution to control global affairs.

Eventually more nations will realize what their beloved leaders have allowed... many have. Hence the creation of social stresses and the exacerbation of cultural conflict have become the hallmarks of their ability to maintain control. There is a reason why the media of the planet was allowed to be consolidated into the hands of a meager 5 controlling corporate entities.... with no word of "monopoly" ever being used in the public sector. It is the domain of institutions like think tanks, the CFR, the Royal Institute of International Affairs, Trilateral Commission, etc. to help maintain the yoke of control via public sentiment, war, and the control of resources on their behalf.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 04:40 PM
link   
Bill OReilly style



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 08:59 PM
link   
reply to post by comfortablynumb
 


As Steven Segall ( SP?) said in one of his stupid movies, "How much is enough?" I don't understand these people. Like Romney for instance, I hear he's worth 250 million, if I was worth that I would lie back and do nothing but relax and party. But alot of these people are worth 10 times that much and want more more more. People like that shouldn't be allowed to pollute our planet with their breath, give me enough to live on comfortably for my life and I will bother nobody



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 09:26 PM
link   

Originally posted by ChaoticOrder
reply to post by comfortablynumb
 



The Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) is Australia's Federal Reserve and this article shows that we're having issues with corruption in that arena, down in Australia too

You know this is a topic I've been wanting to discuss for some while now: what are the differences in monetary policy between the US central bank and the AU central bank in terms of money issuance? This is something which I haven't really read much about on ATS but I think there's some interesting things to look at here, and being from Australia it's relevant to me.

First of all I think it's interesting to note that the Australian dollar and the American dollar have been pretty much equal for around a decade. Sure the USD always seems to sit just above the AUD but that's not important. What's important here is long term changes and inflation. Official figures estimate that the US dollar experiences an inflation rate of about 2% per year.

Also keep in mind that the inflation rate will compound each year. If we assume an average rate of 2% inflation per year, we find that the US dollar has lost some where around 20% of its value in the last 10 years... which seems pretty correct if you consider the increase in prices over the last 10 years. Also remember that in the last 100 years the US dollar has lost some where around 98% of its value.

So why all this talk about the US dollar. Well this is kind of interesting if you remember that the AUD always seems to sit along side the USD. That means our currency is actually losing value at essentially the exact same rate as the USD, does it not? But are we printing the exact same amount of money (aka a # load)? I truly doubt our Government does print that much money. If it does: why?

And if we aren't matching the same levels of money printing (or other methods of creating new currency) then exactly what force might be forcing the AUD to latch onto the USD? I just don't seem to understand why our currency seems to so consistently mimic the behavior of the USD when there should be so many other factors causing them to drift a lot further apart a lot more often. At this point we may as well be using USD's.

Forgive my ignorance in this arena but I know nearly nothing about the Australian Central Bank. I actually know more about the United States Federal Reserve. A lot more.
edit on 14/9/2012 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)


The facts are that the CPI is so flawed that it doesn't really reflect real inflation. If you want to see the real inflation rate visit Shadowstats.com and read John William's primer on the CPI how it is a worthless indicator of inflation today.

www.shadowstats.com...




The substitution-related alterations to inflation methodologies were made beginning in the mid-1990s. The introduction of major hedonic concepts began in the 1980s. The aggregate impact of the reporting changes since 1980 has been to reduce the reported level of annual CPI inflation by roughly seven percentage points, where 5.1 percentage points come from the BLS’s published estimates of the effects of the individual methodological changes on inflation, shown in the preceding table and as discussed later. The balance comes from my estimates of the changes not formally estimated by the BLS. The effects are cumulative going forward in time.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 09:49 PM
link   
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


Well actually the AUD and USD are not really that strongly linked in the long run. I remember that when I was in the Lucky Country in the early 2000's, the Aussie was about 65 cents, and prices in AUD were pretty reasonable.

Now, AUD is equal to USD and prices in AUD have skyrocketed.

The economics are different, Australia has a huge commodities boom thanks to Chinese demand and on a relatively small population that led to alot of new wealth and so the AUD goes up.

Basically when interest rates go up, the currency goes up because bond buyers buy the higher yielding currency and borrow the low yield currency.

The RBA has apparently let a lot of inflation happen---if it had really kept inflation low to where US inflation has been over 10 years then it would have to raise interest rates even more and that would choke the non-resource sectors of the Australian economy. In that case, AUD/USD would be like 1.20 or 1.30.

Right now the AUD isn't higher still because people think China is slowing down and there could be a bust in the property bubble, in which case the central bank will be lowering interest rates rapidly. Traders attempt to anticipate interest rate changes of central banks.

Currency trading is very hard. By the way, it's pretty well established that currencies today are not valued based on classical economics trade flows (as they might have been in the 1800's) but on financial flows which are much bigger, and the biggest of those is the bond market, so interest rates are by far the #1 contributor to currency moves.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 10:34 PM
link   

Originally posted by comfortablynumb
shows that we're having issues with corruption in that arena, down in Australia too...no surprises really...when money is concerned at high levels, there'll nearly always be corruption.


There's no corruption.

To have corruption, you must first have morals.

Without morals, how do you define corrupt?

Only the little people have morals. The big people are free.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 10:42 PM
link   
reply to post by mymymy
 


Precisely! If I had just enough to live my life, I'd focus on what I want to do...comedy and radio. I don't imagine me wanting more than that.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 10:45 PM
link   
reply to post by GreatOwl
 


Soooooooo true! It's us, the little people who see the wrongs and our "kings" don't give a flying #! It's really like not much has changed since the beginning and perhaps, that is due to one simple thing...we're humans.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 10:55 PM
link   

Originally posted by comfortablynumb
reply to post by GreatOwl
 


Soooooooo true! It's us, the little people who see the wrongs and our "kings" don't give a flying #! It's really like not much has changed since the beginning and perhaps, that is due to one simple thing...we're humans.


Nah...you know what the difference is? We're told what to believe, told what morals to have, told what religions to accept, told what is right and wrong....but the people telling us these things...they are not following them...they are simply broadcasting "control messages" to manipulate the populace...so that they can achieve their "higher goals".

How do you think a mob of religious folk gets "activated" and moved into a spot where they begin throwing stones and breaking windows, and igniting fires? They have been well primed, programmed to react, and then simply given the trigger to set them off, at the appropriate time.

That's control.

It looks like the mob is "out of control", when in fact, it's the control program at work, and we only need to find the "trigger man", to understand it's all under control.





new topics




 
21
<<   2 >>

log in

join