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A little AA battery trick they don't want you to know...

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posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 01:17 PM
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Originally posted by InTheFlesh1980
Here are 32 batteries delivering 6 VDC, with (8) legs of (4) batteries to increase the ampacity:



Well done you! I have to say as much as I was good at mechanical problems when a student, electrical stuff always seemed to give me a headache!


Originally posted by Crakeur
I take it nobody thought gagfilms was an odd name for an instructional video.




LOL very good point! I had not noticed that before. Have to admit for safety reasons I don't think opening batteries up is that good an idea unless it is a last resort.


Originally posted by yeahright
reply to post by Crakeur
 


Not if it was about sword swallowing.

Baboom tsssssh.


OMG that was soooooo funny, lol lol I am still laughing at that.
Thanks for making my day



edit on 13-9-2012 by CthulhuMythos because: added a G

edit on 13-9-2012 by CthulhuMythos because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 01:48 PM
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the only thing that works is taking them out and rubbing them together and turning them round



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 02:21 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 

Heres another little trick I used to employ with store bought AA, and D batteries. Although chargers warn against recharging "non-rechargeable" type batteries, it is possible to extend the life of most of these at least a couple of cycles. I used older style chargers, the one that had an inner compartment with a lid that handled four of anything from AA- D size.

Some of the batteries tolerate this better than others and it helps to check how well with an amp meter. They also tolerate the recharge better if you don't completely exhaust the cells. They take better to "topping off". Recharge them like you would any other and then check to see the milliamps or amps available. Discard the ones that don't recharge. Some will last longer than others doing this. The ones that last are a gold mine of savings, I have had store bought alkaline cells that recharge a dozen times.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 10:49 PM
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I had seen the original video and figured it was a hoax, for all of the reasons stated in this thread.

Does anyone know if this one works?




posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 08:51 AM
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Bottom line what are the benefits for the effort? How long does it buy the battery time and life? I can see the benefit if it was a re-chargeable battery.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 05:43 PM
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Some 12 volt car batteries have hundreds of rechargeable AA Batteries inside them.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 05:53 PM
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Originally posted by intrptr
reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 

Heres another little trick I used to employ with store bought AA, and D batteries. Although chargers warn against recharging "non-rechargeable" type batteries, it is possible to extend the life of most of these at least a couple of cycles. I used older style chargers, the one that had an inner compartment with a lid that handled four of anything from AA- D size.

Some of the batteries tolerate this better than others and it helps to check how well with an amp meter. They also tolerate the recharge better if you don't completely exhaust the cells. They take better to "topping off". Recharge them like you would any other and then check to see the milliamps or amps available. Discard the ones that don't recharge. Some will last longer than others doing this. The ones that last are a gold mine of savings, I have had store bought alkaline cells that recharge a dozen times.


Is there a risk that charging "non-rechargeables" would cause the charger to catch on fire and burn the house down? Do you know which brands are good for recharging? Thanks for the tip...



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 05:54 PM
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Originally posted by BadBeast
Some 12 volt car batteries have hundreds of rechargeable AA Batteries inside them.


Any brands you can mention?



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 05:55 PM
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reply to post by Scalded Frog
 


That's cool, thanks for sharing!



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by BadBeast
Some 12 volt car batteries have hundreds of rechargeable AA Batteries inside them.


Biggest line of BS I've seen on ATS. Prove it.

Edit to add:
You are new here so maybe you don't know that purposeful hoaxing is a bannable offense on ATS.
edit on 14-9-2012 by dainoyfb because: I added the last sentence.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by Scalded Frog
 


Kipkay has always produced ligit videos so I see no reason why this wouldn't be. Also, something I saw in the video provides technical support that it is real.

As a side note, it is encouraging that this is done with an Energizer A23 battery because the coin cells will be upper quality cells with a large amount of chemical. Off brand batteries would likely be using cheap cells and the proffit gain from hacking the A23 would't be worth it. There is a lot of shinaniggins in the battery manufacturing world. I have taken apart D cells to find a cheap off brand AA cell inside. I have taken apart many AA cels to see them containing more air than chemical. I have even seen counterfeit Durracell batteries with wild capacity ratings that made it onto the Walmart shelves. My prize is an 8 Lives battery still in the wrapper.



posted on Sep, 14 2012 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 



Is there a risk that charging "non-rechargeables" would cause the charger to catch on fire and burn the house down? Do you know which brands are good for recharging? Thanks for the tip...

Further:
I never had a regular dry cell even melt down in a charger. Heres the thing. The charger should be a "trickle" charger. By that I mean slow milliamps per hour. At that rate it is not overheating the batteries. The chargers that I use are self regulating. There are four receptacles and each has an LED. When the batteries are placed in the charger, the led comes on when the circuitry detects the load and charging begins. If there is a short or (if your numb enough to install backwards), the led will not light. indicating the charger is not active on that cell. The charger individually charges each one at its own rate and the battery will only take current until it is full. Then the circuit detects a slight back flow and turns off. The charger senses its parameters and regulates accordingly. I looked on the web and I couldn't even find the ones I used to use anymore. Maybe they stopped making them?

Edit:Sorry about the link. I found an article on this by somebody-somebody.

Alkaline chargers

Nowadays chargers and batteries "fast charge", people are less patient. The key to recharging alkaline cells of any brand is the Miiliamp per hour rate. 40 Ma/hr. is a trickle charge that won't over heat the battery. The charging time listed on charges as 8 or 12 hour to recharge nicads is about right. Look for one that does that and it should work for alkaline cells. The one the guy used in the article sucked despite manufacturer claims... I never seen one melt or burst.

You can test a chargers rate by inserting a battery into the charger in series with an amp meter. Should draw 1.5 vdc at 40 milliamps for nice cool slow charging. At the end of charging the cell should hold about 1.7 to 1.8 volts.



edit on 14-9-2012 by intrptr because: New link.




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