Birds Have Nothing to say

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posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:06 AM
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Mornin' Folks,

This is my first thread, though I have spoken to many of you.

I've been up since 0500 today. It's 0800 and I haven't heard a 10th of the bird song I usually do.

At dawn there are dozens of different species waking others and creating a cacophony. I usually enjoy them quite a bit. Today I'm completely unnerved. I lived in the LA area for nearly 10 years. Silent birds mean an earthquake.

Dunno where. But I'm in SW New Mexico.

Buenos Dias.

PS. I'm gonna see what I can do about posting my video. Silent. Eerie.
edit on 13-9-2012 by SeenAlot because: Add video




posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:16 AM
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I haven't heard a 10th of the bird song I usually do.


Its not springtime, no ladies to sing to, if you catch my drift



He who sings last...

Singing is hard work, and uses hard won food reserves, so it is the fittest, best-fed males who produce the strongest, most impressive song. Females therefore choose a mate who sings best, because such a male is more likely to be good at raising chicks, to have a good territory, or to pass successful genes to their young.

In many species, once the female has been attracted, the male will sing less often. A bird that sings on and on, late into the season, is probably a lonely batchelor who has failed to attract a mate.

Enjoying your dawn chorus

If you want to listen to a dawn chorus, then the best days to choose are those with fine, clear weather and little wind. It can be cold early in the day, so remember to take warm clothes. Late April through to early June is the best period, when most species are singing well.

Dawn chorus peaks half-an-hour before to half-an-hour after sunrise, but the variety of song can prove too confusing at that time, so why not get into position a good hour before sunrise, and enjoy the arrival of the performers as each takes their turn on stage.


www.rspb.org.uk...



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:22 AM
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Da spwing has spwung. Da gwass has wiz -

I wonda ware da boidiez iz?

I tawt da boidz wuz on da wing - but datz absoid.

Becoz da wingz iz on da boidiez!


--


Who knows, theyre probably eating all the frog eating bees...


(sorry for the poem, been in my head since bbs land almost 500 years ago now)
edit on 13-9-2012 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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Okay, I grant you, no one is looking to procreate at the moment. And the morning is overcast (this is the desert, that is unusual for them). Cooler-yup.

Just eerie enough to tweak my head. I have my coffee outside. They are quiet today.

The Elmer Fudd impersonation above was lame and not appreciated.
edit on 13-9-2012 by SeenAlot because: Correcting spell checkers poor choice of words.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by SeenAlot
 


To me it is really interesting that you started this thread...because I woke up this morning and was wondering the same thing. I live where there is a beautiful spacious courtyard. Usually the sparrows are in the trees making their noises...as also every morning around 4 or 5 am the seagulls fly over the building and make their noises...yesterday and today....nothing. I live in Seattle.

I am worried.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:34 AM
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I am worried.


Don't be, just read my above post...



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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reply to post by SeenAlot
 



Birds chirping less could mean that there is a predator within their vicinity. They may not want to announce their presence to that predator.
(I think that is true, but I could be wrong)





 
reply to post by CrimsonMoon

That's an interesting tidbit of information.





 
 
reply to post by winofiend

Originally posted by winofiend

Da spwing has spwung. Da gwass has wiz -

I wonda ware da boidiez iz?

I tawt da boidz wuz on da wing - but datz absoid.

Becoz da wingz iz on da boidiez!
Does your mom know that you didn't go to school today?



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:40 AM
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reply to post by caladonea
 


I must be in a very special bird sanctuary this morning because, since I woke up, I've noticed sparrows and robins crowding my bird bath, goldfinches and house finches getting into my Cosmos and Mennonite Geraniums for seeds, Kinfishers diving into the pond for goldfish, a Bittern gleaning the lawn for bugs and Terns & Seagulls gliding across the sky headed for freshly turned farm fields.

I won't mention all the birds of prey I've also noticed this morning. SW Ontario is where they've all gone, I guess, maybe since we've had some well-received rainfalls lately.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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It is inevitable that more earthquakes will happen.

So perhaps it's possible one may be soon? Who knows.

It would be wise to take precautions anyways, considering you live in a "high risk" zone.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:42 AM
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reply to post by masqua
 


Where in Canada are you?

The two people agreeing about the absence of birds were both on the West Coast.
Cali and Wash.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


I'm in NM. We have random 4's & 5's. But we don't have major quakes. Which surprises me as the Rocky Mountains are an enormous subduction creation pocked with volcanos.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:48 AM
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reply to post by CrimsonMoon
 


Although your link appears rational and reasonable, it does appear to lack any real scientific evidence or strong sourcing.

Assuming that is the only answer this early in the ball game is silly, considering we don't actually know even a fraction of the data necessary to draw solid conclusions.

Sure it is likely and plausible, but there are still too many unknown factors to be sure.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:50 AM
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Originally posted by SeenAlot
reply to post by muzzleflash
 


I'm in NM. We have random 4's & 5's. But we don't have major quakes. Which surprises me as the Rocky Mountains are an enormous subduction creation pocked with volcanos.


Sorry I misread your post.

I accidentally misinterpreted you to be saying you were still in LA.
I realize now that was a mistake, sorry I just woke up and barely started my cup of coffee.

I would have to say New Mexico is a extremely low risk EQ Zone.
We are talking very low risk.
Not impossible, but highly improbable.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:51 AM
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When getting on the highway this morning for work, I saw my first 'V' of migrating birds. I'm sure it's not much of a note of interest, it just struck me as odd. Seemed kind of early for them to start migrating, as we are still in the warm weather.

This was on the MA/RI border if it is of interest to anyone.
edit on 13-9-2012 by Daemonicon because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:54 AM
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reply to post by muzzleflash
 


I'm in SW Ontario.

I forgot to mention the hundreds of Canada Geese in my area as well. Every morning and evening, we see numerous flocks flying overhead.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:55 AM
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reply to post by SeenAlot
 


Originally posted by SeenAlot

PS. I'm gonna see what I can do about posting my video.



If you want, just 'quote' my post, so that you can copy the Youtube↓Code. Then just paste it into your OP.






All you actually need is the last part of the URL↓, which is the specific Video Code.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=[color=F7FF8A]A-k4RznBEQA



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by Daemonicon
 
I live in Minnesota and the birds were already gathering when I left for Boston 8 days ago. Birds in Boston are singing and getting together as usual. Would birds in New Mexico fly even farther South? Probably, they might smell and be reacting to that freakish storm that hit Iceland two days ago, maybe we are going to have an earlier than usual winter?



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by BrokenCircles
Does your mom know that you didn't go to school today?


OH MY SIDES!!! SPLITTING!! CANNOT CONTAIN MY LAUGHTER.

go hate someone else mr circles. I know you don't like stupid. why act like it?

- Edited to fix idiotic quote tags.

this place is full of tossers lately..

edit on 13-9-2012 by winofiend because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 10:10 AM
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Birds have stones in there brains to navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. If the planet is changing its resonance, the birds would respond in kind. This would also help explain why animals have been acting strange in general. Something is afoot. Or underfoot.



posted on Sep, 13 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by muzzleflash
reply to post by CrimsonMoon
 


Although your link appears rational and reasonable, it does appear to lack any real scientific evidence or strong sourcing.

Assuming that is the only answer this early in the ball game is silly, considering we don't actually know even a fraction of the data necessary to draw solid conclusions.

Sure it is likely and plausible, but there are still too many unknown factors to be sure.


Oh sorry I apologise, it has nothing whatsoever to do with spring, instead I can see clearly now that as you have already implied, its down to earthquakes...

excuse me while I go bang my head against a concrete wall.
edit on 13-9-2012 by CrimsonMoon because: (no reason given)






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