Father

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posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 02:25 AM
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.. the name alone carries immense weight, but, for what reasons and why is this term important to you?

For example:
A baby: father represents security




posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 02:32 AM
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I have travelled many places around the world and I love it when a child calls out to his/her father regardless of what language.....

Yiddish : tatti ; tay ; foter ; tateh
Welsh : tad
Venetian : pare ; popà ; ‘opà ; pupà ; papà
Turkish : baba
Spanish : papá ; viejo ; tata
Swahili : baba ; mzazi
Swedish : pappa
Slovak : otec
Slovenian : ôèe
Sicilian : patri
Sanskrit : tàtah ; janak
Russian : papa
Romanian : tata ; parinte ; taica
Polish : tata ; ojciec
Portuguese : pai
Persian/Farsi : pedar, pitar ; simply baabaa
Norwegian : pappa ; far
Nepali : buwa
Maori : haakoro ; kohake
Mandarin Chinese : baba
Malay : bapa
Latvian : tevs
Latin : pater ; papa ; atta
Lithuanian : tevas ; pradininkas ; protevis
Korean: abonim, aboji, appa
Japanese : otosan, papa
Italian : babbo
Irish : athair ; daidí
Indonesian : bapa ; ayah ; pak
Hungarian : apa ; apu ; papa ; édesapa
Hindi : papa ; pita-ji
Hebrew : abba(h)
German : banketi, papi
French : papa
Finnish : isä
Filipino : tatay, itay, tay ; ama
Estonian : isa
English : father ; dad ; daddy ; pop ; poppa ; papa
Dutch : vader ; papa ; pappie
Czech : táta, otec
Croatian : otac
Bosnian : otac
Brazilian Portuguese : pai
Arabic : babba ; yebba ; abbi (classical)
Afrikaans : vader



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 02:40 AM
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reply to post by davethebear
 


You left one out.
Texan: daddy,pa,papa,pappy



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 02:48 AM
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Originally posted by davethebear
I have travelled many places around the world and I love it when a child calls out to his/her father regardless of what language.....

Yiddish : tatti ; tay ; foter ; tateh
Welsh : tad
Venetian : pare ; popà ; ‘opà ; pupà ; papà
Turkish : baba
Spanish : papá ; viejo ; tata
Swahili : baba ; mzazi
Swedish : pappa
Slovak : otec
Slovenian : ôèe
Sicilian : patri
Sanskrit : tàtah ; janak
Russian : papa
Romanian : tata ; parinte ; taica
Polish : tata ; ojciec
Portuguese : pai
Persian/Farsi : pedar, pitar ; simply baabaa
Norwegian : pappa ; far
Nepali : buwa
Maori : haakoro ; kohake
Mandarin Chinese : baba
Malay : bapa
Latvian : tevs
Latin : pater ; papa ; atta
Lithuanian : tevas ; pradininkas ; protevis
Korean: abonim, aboji, appa
Japanese : otosan, papa
Italian : babbo
Irish : athair ; daidí
Indonesian : bapa ; ayah ; pak
Hungarian : apa ; apu ; papa ; édesapa
Hindi : papa ; pita-ji
Hebrew : abba(h)
German : banketi, papi
French : papa
Finnish : isä
Filipino : tatay, itay, tay ; ama
Estonian : isa
English : father ; dad ; daddy ; pop ; poppa ; papa
Dutch : vader ; papa ; pappie
Czech : táta, otec
Croatian : otac
Bosnian : otac
Brazilian Portuguese : pai
Arabic : babba ; yebba ; abbi (classical)
Afrikaans : vader


Great insight. It is so much more than a word imo.
Symbolically,for those words to be used, it implies that one is belonging to the father, and pure.
To call out for your father is to admit you're in need of that spiritual figure for guidance.
Just my opinion though.,
I have been wrong in my life before



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 03:02 AM
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"Our Father in heaven"

We need to always acknowledge first and foremost who we are talking to.

He (God) is our heavenly Father.

We address Him with respect just as we should address our earthly father with respect.

He is the only true God who created all things in this universe, including ourselves.

He loves us and we need to show our love for Him.




posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 03:05 AM
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Originally posted by mardukiscoming
reply to post by davethebear
 


You left one out.
Texan: daddy,pa,papa,pappy


You forgot... lug nut



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 03:06 AM
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Originally posted by davethebear
I have travelled many places around the world and I love it when a child calls out to his/her father regardless of what language.....

Yiddish : tatti ; tay ; foter ; tateh
Welsh : tad
Venetian : pare ; popà ; ‘opà ; pupà ; papà
Turkish : baba
Spanish : papá ; viejo ; tata
Swahili : baba ; mzazi
Swedish : pappa
Slovak : otec
Slovenian : ôèe
Sicilian : patri
Sanskrit : tàtah ; janak
Russian : papa
Romanian : tata ; parinte ; taica
Polish : tata ; ojciec
Portuguese : pai
Persian/Farsi : pedar, pitar ; simply baabaa
Norwegian : pappa ; far
Nepali : buwa
Maori : haakoro ; kohake
Mandarin Chinese : baba
Malay : bapa
Latvian : tevs
Latin : pater ; papa ; atta
Lithuanian : tevas ; pradininkas ; protevis
Korean: abonim, aboji, appa
Japanese : otosan, papa
Italian : babbo
Irish : athair ; daidí
Indonesian : bapa ; ayah ; pak
Hungarian : apa ; apu ; papa ; édesapa
Hindi : papa ; pita-ji
Hebrew : abba(h)
German : banketi, papi
French : papa
Finnish : isä
Filipino : tatay, itay, tay ; ama
Estonian : isa
English : father ; dad ; daddy ; pop ; poppa ; papa
Dutch : vader ; papa ; pappie
Czech : táta, otec
Croatian : otac
Bosnian : otac
Brazilian Portuguese : pai
Arabic : babba ; yebba ; abbi (classical)
Afrikaans : vader


Uhm... German : banketi, papi ?

No. Really. Papi is okay and used even by my own kids, but I have never, ever even heard the word "banketi". Therefore I have doubts about the whole list.



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 03:16 AM
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reply to post by HamrHeed
 


I am unsure how to respond to that.Am I to be offended,or was that meant as some kind of twisted humor?



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 03:21 AM
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Originally posted by mardukiscoming
reply to post by HamrHeed
 


I am unsure how to respond to that.Am I to be offended,or was that meant as some kind of twisted humor?
]
Nah, texans have good spirit and keep the wheels on.. There are exceptions to this, but it's desperately needed over there i.m.o.p.



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 03:24 AM
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Originally posted by ManFromEurope

Originally posted by davethebear
I have travelled many places around the world and I love it when a child calls out to his/her father regardless of what language.....

Yiddish : tatti ; tay ; foter ; tateh
Welsh : tad
Venetian : pare ; popà ; ‘opà ; pupà ; papà
Turkish : baba
Spanish : papá ; viejo ; tata
Swahili : baba ; mzazi
Swedish : pappa
Slovak : otec
Slovenian : ôèe
Sicilian : patri
Sanskrit : tàtah ; janak
Russian : papa
Romanian : tata ; parinte ; taica
Polish : tata ; ojciec
Portuguese : pai
Persian/Farsi : pedar, pitar ; simply baabaa
Norwegian : pappa ; far
Nepali : buwa
Maori : haakoro ; kohake
Mandarin Chinese : baba
Malay : bapa
Latvian : tevs
Latin : pater ; papa ; atta
Lithuanian : tevas ; pradininkas ; protevis
Korean: abonim, aboji, appa
Japanese : otosan, papa
Italian : babbo
Irish : athair ; daidí
Indonesian : bapa ; ayah ; pak
Hungarian : apa ; apu ; papa ; édesapa
Hindi : papa ; pita-ji
Hebrew : abba(h)
German : banketi, papi
French : papa
Finnish : isä
Filipino : tatay, itay, tay ; ama
Estonian : isa
English : father ; dad ; daddy ; pop ; poppa ; papa
Dutch : vader ; papa ; pappie
Czech : táta, otec
Croatian : otac
Bosnian : otac
Brazilian Portuguese : pai
Arabic : babba ; yebba ; abbi (classical)
Afrikaans : vader


Uhm... German : banketi, papi ?

No. Really. Papi is okay and used even by my own kids, but I have never, ever even heard the word "banketi". Therefore I have doubts about the whole list.


Just because YOU have not heard the word Banketi for father means you are going to dismiss the whole list.....hahahaha...................................I can assure you that the word Banketi does exist...............just have a quick Google and have a look.......................dismiss the whole list....hahahahahahahaaaaaaaaaaaaa



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 04:29 AM
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We begin our prayer, “Our Father Who is in heaven.”

“Our Father in heaven” puts Him and you in the right position.

It is meant to remind you that He is your Father, and He cares for you as His very own dear child.


"Pray, therefore, like this: Our Father Who is in heaven, hallowed (kept holy) be Your name." Matthew 6:9 Amp.

He loves to hear you pray—when you do it the right way. If we complain, He gets up and quietly walks out the door. It is not that He does not care about us. He cares so much that He wants us to grow. He wants us to learn how to receive from His lofty hand. Please say lofty. He wants to hear you pray today more than ever before.

Some people say that they don't have time for prayer. You cannot know Him without a prayer life. With a little prayer life, you can become more sensitive to Him. But if you really want to know Him, it takes time. It is just like getting to know someone. We cannot know how wonderful, powerful, and extraordinary He is unless we have a prayer life. We have to learn how to talk and walk with Him.

I have prayed, “Teach me heaven's language for prayer.” We need to learn how to talk to God as to move His hand on behalf of situations and people. As we move closer to a heavenly language, then faith is going to follow.

In Matthew 6:9, He says to “Pray, therefore, like this.” He is telling us how to address the Father. He wants us to remember who we are coming before. “Hallowed be Thy name.” From there on, your prayer must be aligned with holiness. You are not going to tell Him what you want, but your position must be to hear what He wants. You are going to hallow His name through your prayer. His name will be kept holy.

He knows what we will pray before we pray it. He looks at our hearts. “Our Father in heaven” puts Him and you in the right position.

We talk to Him with honor. We talk to Him with praise and thanksgiving. We wait for Him because we honor Him. We wait with a patient heart because we trust Him. We begin our prayer, “Our Father Who is in heaven.” It is meant to remind you that He is your Father, and He cares for you as His very own dear child. “Hallowed be Your name” by the prayer I am about to pray.
~ Nita Johnson

Teaching on the Lord's Prayer




posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 04:58 AM
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So what is fatherly love? Lately I keep hearing that this term is synonomous with the OLD SCHOOL and masochism.
I know it's political rhetoric, but I see nobody standing up for the truth.
Fatherly love is guidance in its simplicity. It's sacrificing material and momentary satisfaction for the truth and essentially , freedom.
Nothing to do with sex at all.

Let's define motherly love too. Is it the same? I think so, just difference in trajectory.
Discuss



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by davethebear
 


Yes, I dismiss the whole list, as at least a single element is false to my knowledge. So there may be more.

Why should I even bother? It's a list of supposed terms or translations of the word "father".



posted on Sep, 12 2012 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by HamrHeed
So what is fatherly love?


Knowing God As Father

"You sum up the whole of the New Testament teaching in a single phrase if you speak of it as a revelation of the Fatherhood of the Holy Creator... If you want to judge how well a person understands Christianity, find out how much he makes of the thought of being God's child and having God as his Father. If this is not the thought that prompts and controls his worship and his prayers and his whole outlook on life, it means he does not understand Christianity very well at all... Father is the Christian name for God." J. I. Packer

God desires that each one of us knows Him as a loving Father.
It seems that every one of us needs to grow in understanding this wonderful reality of His love on a deep heart level. We all know this in our heads, but when it comes to being truly confident in the love that God our Father has towards us personally, we often fall short.

As we expect to do the miraculous in His Name in the nations, knowing our Father's love and care is absolutely essential. We must have the firm assurance of His love in ourselves because we are called to spread the good news of the Father's love through Christ to a lost and dying world.

What do the people of other religions miss? They miss the reality of knowing the love of God. They believe in numerous gods who cannot love, care and truly help them in their daily lives.

Knowing that God is our Father should affect everything we do and say. To call God "Father" means that He displays, in perfection, the qualities of the best fathers. It should affect all that we do for Him on the mission field. The reality is awesome, the possibilities are limitless, and the power of such truth is beyond comprehension. This is why every one of us needs to cultivate this reality within our own heart. None of us has the full picture of what this really means. When we do begin to understand experientially this truth, we will be unstoppable for God's Kingdom purposes. We will be laying hold of our true relationship, with its authority and responsibilities, and drawing from a love from the Father that is unending, unquenchable and always present. We will then walk in the true dignity of a son or daughter who is living in the Kingdom of God, basking in the richness of that love.

Knowing God As Father





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