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The Roman Empire: Mighty tales of resistence, civilization and the making of modernity.

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posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 04:23 PM
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The Roman Empire was not a big historical topic in South African school history during my youth.
We heard about Caesar in the Shakespeare plays, or in a Biblical context, but much of the teaching was very general.

Nowadays we have historical soap operas, movies and popular conspiracy theories, which broadly claim that the Babylonian royalty went from Rome, to London and then Washington.

But what was Rome all about?
Was it all about insane kings like Caligula and Nero?
We hear mostly about the resistance of the Semitic peoples against Rome.
This is great, and we should hear more, but the northern people also resisted - not only in Britain but also in Germany.
Some say that the cosmopolitan scene created by Rome allowed localized ideas, plants, cults and religions to spread, so the social setting provided by Rome is significant.

What is less mentioned is the resistance of the forest-dwelling Germanic tribes, especially the defeat of the Roman army by Arminius in AD 9.
This battle in the Teutoburger Forest would establish a border between Rome and the "barbarians" that would hold after AD 17.

Was Rome really the first border between "civilization" and "barbarism"?

I'd love any history, debate, music, clips or general feelings about the Romans and their Empire, and also about the various people they fought.
edit on 11-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 04:49 PM
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Arminius (band not mentioned).
Better known as "Hermann", Arminius was a Latinized version of his name.
His pregnant wife Thusnelda was eventually captured, and probably died or was sold as a slave in Rome.


edit on 11-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 05:14 PM
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A haunting atonal composition by Zachary Downing commemorating the battle between the Romans and Jewish resistance forces at Masada in the first century.


edit on 11-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 05:28 PM
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From the BBC's Horrible Histories - Boudicca.

It's bad enough that the English tribes beat the Romans, but they were actually beaten by a girl!


Well, as the adage goes, hell knoweth no fury like a woman wronged.




posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 07:33 PM
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Romans vs. Persians.

A simulation of the Battle of Edessa in 259, during which King Shapur I captured Emperor Valerian and defeated his force of 70 000 Roman soldiers:



en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 11-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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Could take a lot of scenes from this movie
Except maybe the ones with the spaceship.




posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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When I was a bit younger, I always imagined the Germanic and Celtic tribes going to war against the feared and mighty Romans with a song and an attitude like modern metal music.

Manowar - Sleipnir:




edit on 23-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 23 2012 @ 05:48 PM
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A great clip on The Battle of the Teutoborg Forest with various haunting music that stirs up Cherusci tribal descent in a range of modern European people, and scenes from good documentaries.




edit on 23-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 28 2012 @ 03:21 PM
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Concerning the Roman vs. Persian battle above, it was interesting that Shapur I treated the captured Valerian as a foot-stool, and that:


Valerian's body was later skinned and stuffed with manure to produce a trophy of Roman submission preserved in a Persian temple.

en.wikipedia.org...

Valerian tea has a slight off-smell (although my kitty loves it), and often I've wondered how the name "Valerian" became attached to the relaxing herb and tea.

Perhaps this is the explanation.
edit on 28-9-2012 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)




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