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Jupitor inpact An apparent object impact captured about 6:35 am on Sept. 10, 2012 from Dallas, Texas

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posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by jeantherapy
reply to post by TheSparrowSings
 


I don't believe Earth will react the same way to those impacts as the Gas Giant does. It would be more devastating on Earth for obvious reasons.


Yes it would I'm just trying to find out the possible size of that thing.

and them put it true the impact simulate.


www.purdue.edu...




posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 10:51 PM
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Originally posted by Trillium

Originally posted by Rexamus
reply to post by Trillium
 


We're probably a little more concerned with Near Earth Objects than Near Jupiter Objects. I dont give an F what happens to Jupiter, as long as it keeps protecting us from those some of those big ole impacts


Ya but if they do not see the one coming for Jupiter what make your think your safe.

Just think outside the box a little please


I think I'm safe because Jupiter has been taking those big hits for us for thousands of years. And I think anything truly heading our way we can prepare for, provided we discover it in time. .
edit on 10-9-2012 by Rexamus because: (no reason given)

edit on 10-9-2012 by Rexamus because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by Rexamus

Originally posted by Trillium

Originally posted by Rexamus
reply to post by Trillium
 


We're probably a little more concerned with Near Earth Objects than Near Jupiter Objects. I dont give an F what happens to Jupiter, as long as it keeps protecting us from those some of those big ole impacts


Ya but if they do not see the one coming for Jupiter what make your think your safe.

Just think outside the box a little please


I think I'm safe because Jupiter has been taking those big hits for us for thousands of years. And I think anything truly heading our way we can prepare for, in some way or another.
edit on 10-9-2012 by Rexamus because: (no reason given)


Sorry I still say they will not let us know.

But even Jupiter can not bat a 100 % it will only take one .

And we do not have the ability to deal with one that size.
Now this is only a quess now ???????????????????
but this one may have been a few miles or km in size.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 10:59 PM
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edit on 10-9-2012 by Rexamus because: (double post)
edit on 10-9-2012 by Rexamus because: (no reason given)
extra DIV



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by jeantherapy
 


wow.... thank you captain obvious



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


are we even capable of seeing a comet 1km in size when its at the distance of around jupiter?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:13 PM
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Originally posted by choos
reply to post by Trillium
 


are we even capable of seeing a comet 1km in size when its at the distance of around jupiter?


Not realy sure I'm still looking for a possible size of that thing until then it just a lot of quessing.
But it does make you think of all the possibility



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:47 PM
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Here a bit more info but still no possible size of the meteor that hit

cosmicdiary.org...



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by ManBehindTheMask
 


Well you know the death star right? That's what hit it



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:44 AM
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Originally posted by Trillium
Here a bit more info but still no possible size of the meteor that hit

cosmicdiary.org...


Read this link. Only 4 impacts viewed in the last 4 years and all by amateur astronomers.
I guess the scientific community really doesn't give a crap about what hits Jupiter. But I really wish they would, I just think there is a lot we could learn and gauge from watching impacts on other planets.


These impacts or meteors are not only a distraction for planetary astronomers. They give us an opportunity to better understand the internal structure of Jupiter since the energetic ones reveal the lower deck of clouds and provide clues on its composition. Additionally, the complex pattern of jet stream winds at various latitudes can be also directly measured by monitoring the evolution of a scar over a long period of time like it was done for the 2009 impact.

It is also a way to assess the rate of large meteoroid impacts on the planets and understand the role of Jupiter in shielding the inner part of the solar system. This idea remains controversial (see Jupiter: Friend or Foe?) and a direct measurements of the flux of meteors and impact rate may help to provide a better answer to this question.


Excellent information from this source on why viewing these collisions IS important.

edit on 11/9/2012 by TheSparrowSings because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 01:11 AM
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One thing to remember is that the asteroid belt lies between Mars and Jupiter. They are beating and banging around in there and one could have easily bounced out into Jupiter without being detected until impact. I still remember when Shoemaker/levy9 hit, now those were some cool impacts.
edit on 11/9/12 by usmc0311 because: poor spelling.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 02:43 AM
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I'm pretty sure this asteroid was small enough and far enough not to be visible to astronomers prior to impact. If it were approaching the Earth, we would get a chance of spotting it in advance.

There are many small asteroids in Jupiter's orbit, they are called Trojans. It was probably one of those.
en.wikipedia.org...

edit on 11-9-2012 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 09:45 AM
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Originally posted by TheSparrowSings

Originally posted by Trillium
Here a bit more info but still no possible size of the meteor that hit

cosmicdiary.org...


Read this link. Only 4 impacts viewed in the last 4 years and all by amateur astronomers.
I guess the scientific community really doesn't give a crap about what hits Jupiter. But I really wish they would, I just think there is a lot we could learn and gauge from watching impacts on other planets.

There are a lot more of us than there are of them, and we have far more telescopes than they do. Professional astronomers only observe the major planets for specific research purposes and only for short periods of time. Professional telescope time is very finite, precious, and booked well in advance for a wide variety of projects.

Amateurs, on the other hand, are always watching the planets. That is why we can catch things that they miss. Furthermore, the popularization of video astronomy of the planets about a decade ago (really it started before then but didn't become as widespread as it is now until about 2000 or thereabouts) has really allowed us to capture transient events like this that were missed in the past. Impacts like this are from relatively small objects we cannot generally detect directly from earth until they impact.

Similar sized near earth objects have to get relatively close to earth before we can detect them, which is why we frequently see ~10-100m wide asteroids only being detected a few days or weeks before a close approach. We're getting better at detecting these objects farther out, we're already many times better than we were a few decades ago, but we still have to wait till they make a somewhat close approach before we can detect them. The larger they are, the farther that close approach can be with detection remaining possible.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 10:06 AM
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I will post a link to the discovery "video" when it appears on the ALPO Jupiter alert page.
Unnecessary second line.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 10:18 AM
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I have seen this already earlier.

They do look amazing if caught by photo



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 10:23 AM
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Well 10 to 100 meter is not that big
www.spaceweather.com...

I think it was bigger myseft. anybody find out it size yet.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by Trillium
 



I think it was bigger myseft. anybody find out it size yet


The flash appears on a single CCD frame. It is impossible to get a reliable measurement of its brightness. If one could tell exactly how bright the flash was one could calculate approximately how much energy was released, which would yield a narrower range of figures for its mass. As it is, ten to hundreds of meters wide is about the best guess anyone can make. Something that small would not be visible at that distance.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by Trillium
 


Eh?? This thing crashed in to jupiter, and we are looking at the footage online, so we did see it coming. If you mean with the naked eye, I'm even more confused.
To you its thinking outside the box, but to me its simply nonsense



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:34 PM
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Correction. I have since seen the entire sequence. It appears on several frames. I will link to it when it is publicly available. Still no way to measure its brightness effectively, though.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 01:02 PM
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4 sec clip link below and it looks like a big enough impact to me, lucky we have such a large mass body nearby;

www.flickr.com/photos/19299984@N08/7976507568
edit on 11-9-2012 by digitalf because: (no reason given)



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