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God stamped on US money. for or against removing and why?

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posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:04 PM
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Would people want this as an alternative?





posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:09 PM
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Originally posted by Erongaricuaro
God and money have so much in common it seems only right it should be on our money, and it's motto is really "on the money" - In God We Trust.

Both have a great number of people who base their life around attainment of these two commodities and wish to have both in great abundance and working for them. Both have great worth to a great many people but both are constantly being re-manufactured. And if you go all the way back to their source it would be difficult to demonstrate either have any actual value and that both were not just manufactured out of thin air. In God We Trust, indeed. Likewise our money.

I say let it stay. It seems to belong there.

edit on 10-9-2012 by Erongaricuaro because: (no reason given)



true that, maybe Nietzsche could have made a nice statement about this, we killed god and embraced paper with pictures in return, so that we might not kill each other for food..



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:14 PM
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Jesus held up a Roman coin and said "Render unto Caesar that which is Caesar's, and to God, that which is God's. God is not concerned with money, so I don't see why He would care if His Name were removed from money. It seems only humans seem concerned with money, said by many to be the root of all evil, and certainly the reason for our economic problems today. Rather ironic, I would say.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:34 PM
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reply to post by ProfEmeritus
 


It's interesting that you bring up Jesus.
The story goes,

And they sent to him some of the Pharisees and some of the Herodians, to trap him in his talk. And they came and said to him, “Teacher, we know that you are true and do not care about anyone’s opinion. For you are not swayed by appearances, but truly teach the way of God. Is it lawful to pay taxes to Caesar, or not? Should we pay them, or should we not?” But, knowing their hypocrisy, he said to them, “Why put me to the test? Bring me a denariusd and let me look at it.” And they brought one. And he said to them, “Whose likeness and inscription is this?” They said to him, “Caesar’s.” Jesus said to them, “Render to Caesar the things that are Caesar’s, and to God the things that are God’s.” And they marveled at him.


That could easily be flipped around as an argument for God being on the money. If he is on the money then we should do like Jesus said and give it to him...
I don't particularly like that argument because it's twisting the meaning of that passage in Mark 12. It's more concerning the deity of Christ, the pharisees's hypocrisy, and humility to worldly authority.

This whole argument should be scrapped, but the MSM won't have that.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:45 PM
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That could easily be flipped around as an argument for God being on the money. If he is on the money then we should do like Jesus said and give it to him...
reply to post by MeesterB
 

I don't agree with you that the argument could be easily flipped around. Jesus was very clear that His Kingdom was not of this world. In addition, He threw the money changers out of the Temple. Jesus is not at all concerned with Money. He is concerned with us living up to His teachings.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 09:49 PM
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So, then Romney is targetting a audience of only what, the most shaky of faithful or..

I mean, I am critical about everything Romney does, don't get me wrong, but typically I understand who he is targetting his flip flops or nonsense at..this one however went over my head..like if God is taken off money, he would suddenly stop existing (under the assumption he exists to begin with, not wanting a debate about that).

And anyone whom is that weak on their religion..would they vote in a morman to begin with?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 09:53 PM
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I don't think god will care if they take his name off the money. As long as they don't put "In Congress We trust" on it I won't care either.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 10:03 PM
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Jesus threw the money changers out of the temple, didn't He?

So why is God now stamped on money?

WWJD?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:32 PM
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These questions are not that black and white.

In God We Trust is the Official United States National Motto. That's one reason why it's still on our money.


The United States Code at 36 U.S.C. § 302, now states: "'In God we trust' is the national motto."


Another, is that it's wanted by 90% of Americans. Most Americans do fall under some form of God believing religion. This includes Catholics, Protestants, Muslims and Hindu.

You have to look at why this phrase was put onto our money to begin with to understand better the politics of removing it or leaving it on.

Words in parenthesis are mine

The phrase appears to have originated in the Star-Spangled Banner, written during the War of 1812. The fourth stanza includes the phrase, "And this be our motto: 'In God is our Trust.'"

M. R. Watkinson, as part of a campaign initiated by eleven northern Protestant Christian denominations in a letter dated November 13, 1861, petitioned the Treasury Department to add a statement recognising "Almighty God in some form in our coins."[7] At least part of the motivation was to declare that God was on the Union side of the Civil War.

(But Congress itself had to back this up) -> Such legislation was introduced and passed on April 22, 1864, allowing the Secretary of the Treasury to authorize the inclusion of the phrase on one-cent and two-cent coins.

In 1873, Congress passed the Coinage Act, granting that the Secretary of the Treasury "may cause the motto IN GOD WE TRUST to be inscribed on such coins

The motto has been in continuous use on the one-cent coin since 1909, and on the ten-cent coin since 1916. It also has appeared on all gold coins and silver dollar coins, half-dollar coins, and quarter-dollar coins struck since July 1, 1908.[12] Since 1938, all US coins have borne the motto.

( That was for coins, now we look how the phrase came to be on paper money)
In 1956, the nation was going through the height of the Cold War. As a result, the 84th Congress passed a joint resolution to replace the existing motto with "In God we trust". The change was partly motivated by a desire to differentiate between communism, which promotes atheism, and Western capitalistic democracies, which were at least nominally Christian.[15] The law was signed by President Eisenhower on July 30, 1956, and the motto was progressively added to paper money over a period from 1957 to 1966.[13] (Public Law 84-851)[16] The United States Code at 36 U.S.C. § 302, now states: "'In God we trust' is the national motto."

In 2006, on the 50th anniversary of its adoption, the Senate reaffirmed "In God we trust" as the official national motto of the United States of America.[17] In 2011 the House of Representatives passed an additional resolution reaffirming "In God we trust" as the official motto of the United States, in a 396-9 vote.[18][19] According to a 2003 joint poll by USA Today, CNN, and Gallup, 90% of Americans support the inscription "In God We Trust" on U.S. coins.[20]

(Even the Muslim and Hindu religions subscribe to this phrase)

Feisal Abdul Rauf, a Muslim imam writes that the phrase “In God we trust” resonates with Islamic teaching, offering two verses from the Qur’an: "Our Lord, we have indeed heard a Crier calling to faith, saying 'Trust in your Lord, so we have trusted..." (Quran 3:193) or "[The messenger and the believers] trust in God, in His Angels, His Scriptures, His Books and His Messengers..." (Quran 2:285).[23] Similarly, Melkote Ramaswamy, an Hindu American scholar, writes that the presence of the phrase “In God we trust” on American currency is a reminder that “there is God everywhere, whether we are conscious or not.”


en.wikipedia.org...

So you see, if the phrase were removed, you would have to change the national motto, and tick off a very wide range of people who want this phrase to stay. Apparently U.S. government as late as 2011 felt this phrase was still valid for our money.
edit on 10-9-2012 by JohnPhoenix because: sp



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:04 AM
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I'm for keeping it because I'm a fan of tradition and history, and it should be understood simply as an aesthetic tradition.

People who want to remove it are making a mountain out of a molehill. I'm sick to death of people "taking offense" at every little thing and fighting these passionate symbolic wars over things like this. If people jus ignored stuff like this and put their passion into battles that really mattered, we'd all be better off.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:28 AM
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For removing it.

Why? Simple. Seperation of Church and State.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:41 AM
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I DO care whats on my money.

Id rather not have religious idiots turn America turned into a joke. Oh... to late.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by babybunnies
 



For removing it.

Why? Simple. Seperation of Church and State.
All right, your argument is that it is unconstitutional. That's a perfectly good argument. So good that it went to the 9th Circuit (California) for a three judge hearing in 2010.

content.usatoday.com...

The phrase "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance and "In God We Trust" on U.S. money do not violate the Constitution's separation of church and state, a federal appeals court panel has ruled in San Francisco.

"The Pledge is constitutional," Judge Carlos Bea wrote for the majority in the 2-1 ruling by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel. "The Pledge of Allegiance serves to unite our vast nation through the proud recitation of some of the ideals upon which our Republic was founded."

The panel ruled 3-0 on the money motto.
3-0 in California? Well, it looks like we'll have to find another argument.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:47 AM
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I am 100% for Separation of Church and State.

The money wasn't a big thing - - - but Fundamental Christians use it in debates against separation of church and state. Which is stupid - - because it was a political move to counter Communism. (Federal Reserve Note '50s. Coins were very early)

Plus I like E pluribus unum much better - - - always have.

And - - since many citizens are Atheist - - - "In God We Trust" is incorrect.


edit on 11-9-2012 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:51 AM
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You know, it occurs to me that the money in the US is "Federal Reserve Notes" and the Fed is a private bank.

So...its not a matter of church and state, technically. It's the choice of the evil reptiles that run the Fed.

I'd love to go back to pre-Wilson-era Greenbacks that were printed by the Treasury and not the Fed and thus, technically, were government-made. If we could do that I wouldn't care what they printed on them.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by Annee
 

Dear Annee,

Still a joy to see you. I think every thing you posted is true, I might not agree with it, but they're all true, with one exception.

The motto was placed on our 1 and 2 cent coins in 1864, and more coins were added in as time went on. I don't think fighting Communism was the purpose.

With respect,
Charles1952



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 01:03 AM
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Originally posted by charles1952


The motto was placed on our 1 and 2 cent coins in 1864, and more coins were added in as time went on.


I do know that. I was going to post it - but forgot. I went back and added a short statement.

The change in the Federal Reserve Notes and the Pledge of Allegiance is significant to me - - - because I was there when it happened. I was about 12 or a little younger.

Not everyone was happy about it. Lawsuits began almost immediately.

I like E pluribus unum - - - I've always preferred it.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 01:08 AM
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Originally posted by FortAnthem


I was just reading along and thought of that right before I saw your post



___________



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by silent thunder
You know, it occurs to me that the money in the US is "Federal Reserve Notes" and the Fed is a private bank.


Where is money printed?



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by Annee
 


The Bureau of Engraving and Printing. They've got a factory in D.C. and San Antonio. And for more than you ever wanted to know about it: www.moneyfactory.gov...





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