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My Tomatoes have not ripened

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posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:53 PM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 
Soil depletion.

I grew my tomatoes this year but started a little late. Only got the last of my 1st crop last week. The 2nd crop probably wouldn't last but they took a while to ripen.

I suspect soil depletion.




posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:54 PM
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Originally posted by SunnyDee
I added so truly sad garden pics to my opening post.


Not sad at all! Anything is better than nothing!

Oh and love your chickens by the way. Handsome rooster! I have one Cochin and 3 Bantam hens. Also 3 Bantam roosters that need to go to a home or the freezer!






posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:56 PM
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Originally posted by SunnyDee
I added so truly sad garden pics to my opening post.


Ive looked at your pics and I cant really say. Youve said its been hot so maybe thats the deal. Especially with trimming a tree back that was most likely giving them some needed shade. That seems to be the only difference youve mentioned. Weather might be the only other real variable.

BTW your garden doesnt look half as bad as it seems like you imagine. Especially under the conditions youre having to grow. If you add about 5-6" of real wood mulch (not the colored stuff you buy, red, black.etc) to it you wont have to water nearly as much. And as it breaks down it will add to the soil. You will have to stop tilling though. If you till it in then it will tie up a lot of your available nitrogen. Just rake it back where you want to plant, either seeds or plants, then put it back when theyve sprouted or are big enough to not be covered by it.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 02:00 PM
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I doubt its soil depletion. They produced fruit but just didnt ripen. Probably temperature. If you have a tree on the east side then chop it down and chip it up leaves and all then spread it on your garden. I would plant a tree on the west side as morning sun is better than late afternoon sun. If your garden is getting at least 6-8 hours of direct sunlight youre good to go.
edit on 10-9-2012 by winnar because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by winnar
 


Thanks for the tip.
And to the other posters, I think I'd have to agree with soil depletion. Still, you'd think some tomatoes would ripen! I'm talking none here.

It actually makes me worry for all of us. How easily a planting season can fail, but you don't know it until halfway through.

I need to learn more about nutrients and PH, I think.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 
Well some experienced gardeners once told me if the crops are stunted in whatever year, just wait one year out, don't plant there, treat the soil then try again the 2nd year after.

That has worked wonders for me.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 02:16 PM
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Same here, my tomaters didn't do nearly as well past the past 2 years. I blame that white-hot sun we had all summer. All the farmer's crops have suffered as well. I just pulled my first ripe tomato 2 days ago! I'm glad I didn't grow very many tomato plants this year and focused on the peppers instead, They loved the sun and did amazingly well. Squash and pumpkin did well too but those delicate tomato plants couldn't handle the intense sunlight,

I'm in the great lakes region. Ed Dames is right!!!!!
edit on 10/9/12 by Darce because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 03:03 PM
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Colorado here. Same story for my garden as many in my town. Tomatoes are small and won't ripen, the very few there are. Cherry tomatoes not doing too bad.

Pepper plants produce alot of peppers, but very, very small.

Watermelon plants, of 4 plants I have only two fruit that have been about 3 inch diameter for 6 weeks now.

Out of 4 zucchini plants, only 2 zucchini produced that have finally reached about 7 inches long.

Out of 4 cucumber plants, I have only 3 cucumbers, which are deformed and look like 2 inch diameter watermelons.

My canteloupe are finally growing well, so I guess I might have a few of them, but we'll see.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 03:04 PM
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Originally posted by Darce

I'm in the great lakes region. Ed Dames is right!!!!!
edit on 10/9/12 by Darce because: (no reason given)


Ed Dames was right about what, may I ask?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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it looks like they lack water.

you should have watered them more.

by more i mean more frequently, not more water, because if it was that hot, any available moisture would have evaporated before the plants could get their basic requirements.

tomatoes also need shade as constant direct sunlight could harm them.
edit on 10-9-2012 by randomname because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 02:54 AM
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Originally posted by AndyMayhew
My tomatoes have produced about a half dozen flowers - no sign of any fruit at all. I blame the weather. Maybe I'l get some for Christmas?


Hi Andy...(my fellow Welshman?)
I decided to try some 'bush tomatoes' this year. I have 2 plants....both, like you have loads of flowers. I am going to take them indoors soon. It's not impossible to grow tomatoes indoors and apparently if you have grown tomatoes in pots (I also have 2 moneymakers which have stayed smaller due to being in pots) they are quite happy to be moved indoors and can indeed give you tomatoes up till around christmas time.
I'd rather try it, than let them go to waste obviously.

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 03:09 AM
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Trim just the bottom/lower leaf stems and leaves off the plant to enhance ripening
also remove and leaves which are not green.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Tomatoes Not Ripening - by Purdue University


At the same time, tomatoes do not produce lycopene and carotene, the pigments responsible for ripe tomato color, when temperatures are above 85 deg. F. So, extended periods of extreme heat cause tomatoes to stop ripening. The resulting fruits often appear yellowish green to yellowish orange.


Hope that helps you see it wasn't your fault - blame Mother Nature or the heat wave or you know what



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 08:51 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Up here in NW Oregon, no one could really get tomatoes to grow this year. I am not sure why, but even some of the growers around here in the rural areas just gave up. Maybe the weather or something in the air.

Reading this thread, it seems like tomatoes did better east of the Rockies, not sure if that means anything. I hope we all have better luck next year.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 09:09 AM
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reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Do you use the chickens for fertilizer?

If you have been maintaining the garden for a few years I would recommend a soil test.
Much like the soils at a farm, a garden needs to have the nutrients put back in or else the ground just grows poorly.

Also some petiole samples from the plant may be helpful to get tested.

www.cagrowlab.com... This looks like a decent lab in CA



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 09:38 AM
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We didn't get to put in a huge garden, like last year, as the property switched hands from one developer to another, and we waited. So we got a little garden in out front and didn't think they would ripen, but we've had a few feeds so far, the tomatoes are really sweet, we have had steady sunshine, all summer.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 09:41 AM
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we should limit the watering and prune for more sunlight to reach the three main leaves on a beam and reach the fruit,Too.....I'm jealous of all you growers with temps under 104 in the shade.....Texas....



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 10:12 AM
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Originally posted by Trexter Ziam
reply to post by SunnyDee
 


Tomatoes Not Ripening - by Purdue University


At the same time, tomatoes do not produce lycopene and carotene, the pigments responsible for ripe tomato color, when temperatures are above 85 deg. F. So, extended periods of extreme heat cause tomatoes to stop ripening. The resulting fruits often appear yellowish green to yellowish orange.


Hope that helps you see it wasn't your fault - blame Mother Nature or the heat wave or you know what

This actually makes the most sense. We've had 95-105 degree weather for the last month or two. Hottest summer consistently that I recall in my 13 years in the high desert. My husband said it was the sun. Guess I'll have to give him that one. Thanks.



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 10:46 AM
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dont worry they should start now, ours are


but no cherrys this year BOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO



posted on Sep, 11 2012 @ 11:38 AM
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This is the first year that my zucs did not have a fruit among them!

They were loaded with flowering blooms, and nary a one turned into a zuc...I read where you can manually pollinate them, so even tried that.

I also noticed this year, that I hadnt seen any bees...not one. Yellow jackets, abundant, bees, zip.

My tomatoes also were doing miserable...in fact, my entire garden pretty much went belly up.






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