Simple way to discover if your produce is GMO.

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posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 09:31 AM
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reply to post by antar
 

I dont think conventional excludes GMO.

In other words, conventional can still be genetically modified.

edit on 10-9-2012 by gladtobehere because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 09:45 AM
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thanks for the info. will have a dig around the produce fridge at work...

we have a few US imports (pomegranates, and some times grapes, oranges, prunes)



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 10:52 AM
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I will look at the numbers in the produce isle next time I go shopping, just to see. to that poster, I would think looking at the tags much easier than trying to track a worker down ,

and then do they know if the produce is gmo or not....how do you know their info is correct??



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:02 AM
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Just an FYI for all of you wondering why Organic is more expensive than conventionally grown or GMO grown.

this is coming from a grower. (not me, my uncle. He's a U pick farmer)

In order to grow organic, the farmer has to meet regulations. It's basically a TAX to have an organic farm. They have to be inspected and tested many times throughout a plants life. This is all paid for by the organic farmer. the sending away and testing has to be paid for by the farmer. Much tougher fines if it does not meet specks.

Many farmers do not bother with "organic" labels because it costs them to much to become certified. BIG HASSLES. They can not use weed control chemicals so therefore they have to hire people to pull weeds. Thats not free and takes up TONNES of time and money. So many organic farmers will spray or find chemicals that are not listed on the tests to kill weeds. Or they time their sprays well before tests so they do not get nailed.

What this means is that Organic farmers will use weed killers (of sorts) just timed so as not to be in the plant when tested. That or they are regulated to death, so they make NO MONEY!

Weeds will kill healthy plants in NO TIME! So either they pull the weeds by hand, or they spray! If they don't, they are probably broke!

Thanks to government regulations.....they are KILLING organic farming one step at a time.


One more FYI !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

My uncle had about 10 acres of potatoes that he didn't sell in time on the U pick farm last year. So rather than letting them go to waist; he wanted to give them to the food bank. The food bank gives food to people who need food for free. He wanted to give it to them for free and this would have helped the poor and the food bank since it needed food BIG TIME!

So he calls around and finds out that in order to donate to them, he would have to dig up the potatoes, clean them, and bag them, and then deliver them.

That's a TONNE of work for a farmer who does not have a potato picking machine, a bulk potato cleaner, a bagging machine, or a truck that could deliver tonnes of potatoes.

So guess what! Rather than donate the potatoes, he was forces to say F You to the food bank, and just plow the potatoes back into the ground.

The food bank did not offer to help, or to supply someone with the equipment to help. They expected my uncle to slave away to help them. They could have even sent all their volunteers out to pick potatoes for free to give to the needy.
They could have even made a sign that said for free potatoes go to this farm just outside town 1 mile. Nope nothing......the food bank would not do it. so F them.

Something to think about! We have the food to feed the homeless and needy.....They just don't want it.
We have the organic food to feed to people, the government is just making it to expensive to make and label it as such.


Our current system is run by retards!



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:04 AM
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also to have an organic label......The farmer has to pay for that too! Very expensive.

and they have to pay for the inspectors to come out.

It's just a scam!



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:06 AM
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Originally posted by theclutch

The food bank did not offer to help, or to supply someone with the equipment to help. They expected my uncle to slave away to help them. They could have even sent all their volunteers out to pick potatoes for free to give to the needy.


What they could have done was sent all those people who need food to the potato field to shovel those starches out of the ground and make the homeless people work for their food. Everyone wants something for free but WILL NOT work hard for it.

It's things like this that make me NOT WANT to contribute to the food bank. Lazy bastards.


I am glad your uncle didn't contribute.
edit on 10-9-2012 by Skywatcher2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by Skywatcher2011
 


You are correct! I do not give to any agency anymore. No charity will ever get a dollar from me. It's all just a scam.

Even the labeling is just in the corporations favor.

I'll be you the only reason that GMO does not want labeling on their products is because then they would have to pay the governments in order to "prove" that they are GMO!

It all comes down to money and the bottom line.

It''s like "Kosher" food. The reason it is so expensive is that anything that has a kosher symbol means that company paid to prove it. A rabbi has to come out and inspect the entire process and also has to be on hand to "bless" the food. That all costs money. And kosher is labeled on thousands of products. One sybol they use is a circle with a U inside it. take a look at how many foods have this.

Kosher also does not have to say how much it costs us to have our food taxed like this. They do it anyways.

It's a scam and a broken system of greed.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:16 AM
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Originally posted by InfamousRebel
Why do people focus on organic food if they are truly health conscious? They still use pesticides to grow them, pesticides that seep into the fruit through the skin. Either way you are eating poison.


With respect Infamousrebel
Your post is confusing as it is mis informed

We grow organic fruits and vegetables
Pesticides are something we never use nor do any organic farmers I know



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by artistpoet
 


how do you get rid of your weeds? what does that cost you? How much does it cost you to have an organic label? Where do you grow, and how many acres is the farm?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:23 AM
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Who's volunteering to go to their local market to see how many GMO's there are actually being sold?



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 11:35 AM
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Originally posted by InfamousRebel
reply to post by Urantia1111
 


Nope. Common misconception.


Contrary to what most people believe, "organic" does not automatically mean "pesticide-free" or "chemical-free". In fact, under the laws of most states, organic farmers are allowed to use a wide variety of chemical sprays and powders on their crops.


www.ocf.berkeley.edu...
edit on 9-9-2012 by InfamousRebel because: (no reason given)



What is organic? Organic is a labeling term that indicates that the food or other agricultural product has been produced through approved methods that integrate cultural, biological, and mechanical practices that foster cycling of resources, promote ecological balance, and conserve biodiversity. Synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, and genetic engineering may not be used.

www.ams.usda.gov...



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 12:40 PM
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Some really great replies, I am on for just a quick minute but wanted to say that since this thread I was reminded that not only does the end product matter when it comes to GMOs but also the seed itself and the regulations on that.

One way or another monsanto wants to control the food chain and supply, many countries are opting out of all gmo based seed and chemicals, but it needs to be unanimous worldwide. I know most of you have decided that John Titor was a hoax as being a time traveler but one thing that really struck me as authentic was when he said the greatest failure of our time was the use of GMOs.

Personally it is a hard battle to raise non GMOs because the farms all around me are getting their seed from the same sources they have for generations, problem is that they are being sold only GMO.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 12:46 PM
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reply to post by gladtobehere
 


As I have stated I am no expert but here is one article which may help clarify your good question.:


GMO Vs. Conventional Yields


www.ehow.com...



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by theclutch
reply to post by artistpoet
 


how do you get rid of your weeds? what does that cost you? How much does it cost you to have an organic label? Where do you grow, and how many acres is the farm?



I grow with a friend at present - We have an commercial size Polytunnel as well as some reclaimed plots.

However I have been part of a Community of like minded people/friends.
We had 3 small holdings - I would be guessing if I gave you the acreage of all 3 farms.
We also owned land and peat rights
We had our own well also.
Though we grew on a Commercial size at one time - It was not a commercial venture.
Apart from our own produce which we used in meals at our Crafts Centre Cafe though that was 400 miles approx away and had to be transported.
We were testing our wings to be totally self sufficient in the future, if needs must, and also in a situation to help others, if needs be.

As for weeding we all helped out - hoeing and pulling weeds which cost nothing
edit on 10-9-2012 by artistpoet because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:35 PM
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The organic farmers I know personally are very serious about their own operations, they won't even allow somebody to walk through their fields if they've sprayed themselves with insect repellant. And if they treat the plants with anything it's always a spray of garlic or hot pepper water.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 01:40 PM
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I grow organically, hydroponically and hydro-organic as well. For my organic plants I use only castings, guanos and other bio-organic nutrients and also suppliment with compost teas. I never use any chelated nutriients on those plants nor do I use synthetic or chemical peticides. just pyrethim, neem, and I also use compamion plants and predator mites as a way to battle insects and a varitety of fungus and molds.


...I just love when someone comes at me with "oh youre not growing totally organic" ..dude please, come ATTEMPT to do what I do. Come put in the hard work and the know how before you spout off.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 06:52 PM
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Originally posted by InfamousRebel
reply to post by Urantia1111
 


Nope. Common misconception.


Contrary to what most people believe, "organic" does not automatically mean "pesticide-free" or "chemical-free". In fact, under the laws of most states, organic farmers are allowed to use a wide variety of chemical sprays and powders on their crops.


www.ocf.berkeley.edu...
edit on 9-9-2012 by InfamousRebel because: (no reason given)


but are the crops sprayed with roundup and modified to be resistant to it? i'd rather take my chances washing some organic veggies and eating them



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 07:20 PM
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Monsanto, even the word conjures poisen in the psyche
And that is a good thing for Monsanto are bad news
Link this latest report to other events and they seem to be really clamping down on not just Organic Food
But any who wish to be at Liberty
But it should be no surprise - after all it is a part of of the elites plan.
Bet they don't eat GMO



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by heathwithnoteeth
thanks for the info. will have a dig around the produce fridge at work...

we have a few US imports (pomegranates, and some times grapes, oranges, prunes)


It seems that a lot of people don't seem to realize where the GMO in our food supply truly is. There are very few actual fruits and vegetables in any grocery store across North America that have any GMO produce. Most of the produce in most stores is not GMO at all. There hardly IS any GMO produce. Most GMO food has so far been produced to be added to processed food. Most of the GMO you consume is in the form of four simple things:
1. any kind of soy, 2, any kind of corn product, 3, canola oil, 4. Cottonseed.

It's these products that are in almost everything if you read the ingredients. And now there are GMO sugar beets - but again, beets at the store, even conventionally grown, are not GMO yet. The GMO ones are used to make sugar in the U.S. and now Canada. So now, many things with sugar in them will also join the list.

There are of course exceptions, in that yes, there are some GMO crops out there of vegetables that make it into stores, and this is increasing, but they are still not widespread. What IS widespread is the fact that GMO is in: mayonaise, pizza, soup, cookies, cereals, frozen dinners, ice cream - just keep thinking of foods! THAT is where you will be getting the bulk of GMO unless you read the ingredients and avoid those foods or find alternative ones.



posted on Sep, 10 2012 @ 08:48 PM
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Originally posted by christoph

Originally posted by InfamousRebel
reply to post by Urantia1111
 


Nope. Common misconception.


Contrary to what most people believe, "organic" does not automatically mean "pesticide-free" or "chemical-free". In fact, under the laws of most states, organic farmers are allowed to use a wide variety of chemical sprays and powders on their crops.


www.ocf.berkeley.edu...
edit on 9-9-2012 by InfamousRebel because: (no reason given)

but are the crops sprayed with roundup and modified to be resistant to it? i'd rather take my chances washing some organic veggies and eating them


There are several requirements for something to be certified as organic. Not to mention that what they DO use as pesticides (and not all organic farmers use pesticides) has strict guidelines on what is and is not allowed to be used. I'd certainly rather eat something that had potassium bicarbonate on it than Roundup. Organic farmers also rotate crops which is essential to producing good, nutrient rich veggies and fruits. If you plant the same crop over and over again in the same place, it robs the soil of certain nutrients that are traditionally part of that crop, and eventually, the crop produced will be paler, not as tasty, and not have as many nutrients.

Different approaches to pest control are equally notable. In chemical farming, a specific insecticide may be applied to quickly kill off a particular insect pest (animal). Chemical controls can dramatically reduce pest populations for the short term, yet by unavoidably killing (or starving) natural predator insects and animals, cause an ultimate increase in the pest population. Repeated use of insecticides and herbicides and other pesticides also encourages rapid natural selection of resistant insects, plants and other organisms, necessitating increased use, or requiring new, more powerful controls.

In contrast, organic farming tends to tolerate some pest populations while taking a longer-term approach. Organic pest control involves the cumulative effect of many techniques, including:

allowing for an acceptable level of pest damage;
encouraging predatory beneficial insects to control pests;
encouraging beneficial microorganisms and insects; this by serving them nursery plants and/or an alternative habitat, usually in a form of a shelterbelt, hedgerow, or beetle bank
careful crop selection, choosing disease-resistant varieties
planting companion crops that discourage or divert pests;
using row covers to protect crops during pest migration periods;
using pest regulating plants and biologic pesticides and herbicides
using no-till farming, and no-till farming techniques as false seedbeds [3]
rotating crops to different locations from year to year to interrupt pest reproduction cycles;
Using insect traps to monitor and control insect populations.

Each of these techniques also provides other benefits—soil protection and improvement, fertilization, pollination, water conservation, season extension, etc.—and these benefits are both complementary and cumulative in overall effect on farm health. Effective organic pest control requires a thorough understanding of pest life cycles and interactions.

Organic pest control is similar to integrated pest management in some respects.

Like it or not, organic IS different and the term indeed means something.





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