It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Another issue with exotic pets...

page: 1
2

log in

join
share:

posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 09:15 PM
link   
Salmonella

I know people like to satisfy their desire to own something more unique than their neighbors, but whatever to the idea of having a commonly domesticated pet?



Spiky pet hedgehogs may be adorable, but they’re also a source of salmonella infections that have sickened at least 14 people in six states, government health officials said. Half of those infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium linked to the prickly critters are kids younger than 10, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Three people have been hospitalized.


I believe the owning of animals that are not domesticated should be more heavily regulated or even outlawed.

Domestic animal/pet ownership is a tremendous responsibility that should not be taken lightly and the possibility of disease transmission is very real. This societal concern becomes exacerbated when people begin dealing with unfamiliar animals. Not to mention the physical harm some exotics pose when unattended.




posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 09:30 PM
link   
reply to post by totallackey
 


There seem to have been an inordinate number of devastating incidents with unusual pets as of late. Here's one, a tiger that killed it's owner in Ontario:
bigcatescapesmaulings.blogspot.ca...
And a lion apparently on the lam in England:
www.bbc.co.uk... and-essex-19388301
I really don't think that people get that some animals have been domesticated, and that others haven't. Really, it takes generations for this to occur.

Animal Domestication: National Geographic : ngm.nationalgeographic.com...



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 09:46 PM
link   
Its not even fair for the animals a lot of times. They are often kept in tiny cages, and the owners don't always know how to take care of them properly.

There was a lady who loved snaked, and she collected all sorts of them. She got bite many times and thought she built an immunity. She also would let the snakes out and crawl around, and one went under a couch. Reaching to grab it, it bite her and she died a horrible dead. Then, cops found her house full of blood and they killed every damn snake to see what kind it was.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 09:50 PM
link   
reply to post by totallackey
 


I actually worked for a company that is one of the major suppliers of exotic pets in the United States for several years and can attest that many of these animals have issues that buyers many not be aware of. For the most part, state specific laws keep the majority of people safe.

The real problem lay in the fact that folks simply don't research for themselves why their state doesn't allow a certain type of animal to be sold. They complain and try to start grass roots movements. Turtles are a prime example of this. They are illegal in many places exactly because of the salmonella issue... and yet parents will just drive to buy one because their kids want one.

Then they want to sue when the kid gets sick.

Other issues can include people not understanding that exotics can be a financial burden. Even rabbits and ferrets can bring veterinary sticker shock to unlearned buyers. Birds can have lifespans much longer than the average buyer understands. And reptiles can have a plethora of needs that the average person is not automatically prepared to deal with.

The best bet is to always do the research before getting an exotic!

~Heff



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 10:36 PM
link   
I agree that there should be a much greater control over exotic pets. I used to make a lot of money, by raising reptiles and amphibians, which I then sold to distributors.

I decided that the average person didn't take the time to learn how to give proper care to these animals. I'd support legislation outlawing the trade of exotic animals.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 10:40 PM
link   
reply to post by totallackey
 


Man, if you're afraid of people having hedgehogs as pets, you'd really be afraid of what I want (mountain lion).

Seriously though, Salmonella is a very dangerous issue. I guess we'd better ban eggs first though, considering that is a much more dangerous source:


About 142,000 (reported) Americans are infected each year with Salmonella enteritidis from chicken eggs, and about 30 die.[26]

University of Wikipedia



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 10:44 PM
link   
Exotic pets, exotic dancers, the same thing. My wife won't let me have one at home.



posted on Sep, 7 2012 @ 11:35 PM
link   
Exotic pets don't bother me to a certain level. I owned an Iguana and I understood that there was a risk of salmonella. But with proper precautions and sanitation it was never an issue in my house. The main concerns I have are with Chimps, tigers and other such "pets" that can be a hazard to the community you live in if they get out or if its a breeding pair that can become an invasive threat to the environment.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 07:19 AM
link   
reply to post by Jebbaroo
 


I appreciate your reply. I believe there are similar reports to yours every year. This is what alarms me a little. People like the idea of danger and excitement and they throw common sense out of the window when it comes to exotic pet ownership.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 07:23 AM
link   
reply to post by ReadyPower
 


You bring up a valid point. Is there a "manual," concerning how to care for the animal? Who wrote the manual? What to do in case of an emergency? How much can a vet really tell you about some exotics?



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 07:27 AM
link   
reply to post by Hefficide
 


Thanks for your contribution. Like I said in my post, I can understand the desire to explore and grasp the unique. But your point highlights the distinct lack of planning and oversight people engage in when it comes to exotic pet ownership. The food, shelter, and even the basic handling concerns, seem to get thrown out the window.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 07:31 AM
link   
reply to post by tamusan
 

That is an interesting response. Was it general conversation with other people or perhaps the stories of things gone wrong that led you to this decision? I applaud you on your decision.



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 07:35 AM
link   
reply to post by DeliriumAquarium
 

Yes, I most certainly would be afraid of your mountain lion. How do your neighbors feel?



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 07:36 AM
link   
reply to post by KeliOnyx
 


Your post most certainly touches on the aspect: "What happens when the thrill is gone?"



posted on Sep, 8 2012 @ 01:22 PM
link   
The reason it mostly happens to kids under 10, is because they tend to want to kiss their pets and don't wash their hands after handling them.



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 12:33 AM
link   
Salmonella can be found on eggs and meats. I have never understood the panic over it being on a reptile. You wash your hands after handling raw meat so wouldn't you do the same when you handle a pet like that. Shouldn't you supervise children if touching a reptile to make sure they wash their hands? most reptiles can deliver a painful bite so all children should have supervision anyway when handling them, if they do not that is on the parents for being stupid. I have had exotic and unusual pets and probably always will. It's just like the issues with dogs and cats, people do not properly research what it takes to care for the pet and end up having trouble. Whether its the adorable little puppy getting huge and eating your coffee table (I have had a coffee table destroyed by a teething puppy) or getting sick because your not smart enough to at least keep a 1 dollar bottle of hand sanitizer next to a reptile enclosure and use it every time you handle anything with the cage its all the same to me. I prefer my animals over most people, even if they ate my brand new shoes or destroyed the inside of their cage (bunny now has stainless steel everything).

If I had my way there would be a test before you could take home any pet proving you understood what you were getting into, granted I also think there should be mandatory parent education.



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 01:44 AM
link   
reply to post by totallackey
 





You bring up a valid point. Is there a "manual," concerning how to care for the animal? Who wrote the manual? What to do in case of an emergency? How much can a vet really tell you about some exotics?


There is a wealth of information available about the husbandry or care of any animal which has ever been studied. There are books, journals, magazines, online forums and websites, to point out the obvious.

You do not need a degree in wildlife biology, or be a DVM, to be able to properly care for an animal you wish to keep. It just takes the time to research and study the animal. With the internet, especially, there is little excuse for not knowing the precise environment required to properly sustain an organisms life.

When I was actively involved with selling reptiles and amphibians, I was commonly asked about how to care for various animals. Usually, it was already too late for my best advice. That was: Before you get the animal, learn everything there is to know, and prepare a suitable enclosure.



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 01:56 AM
link   
reply to post by totallackey
 





That is an interesting response. Was it general conversation with other people or perhaps the stories of things gone wrong that led you to this decision? I applaud you on your decision.


Thank you for the applause, it was unexpected.

As I assume for most breeders of reptiles and amphibians, I was also involved with animal rescue. I saw too many unwanted exotic animals, during my time in the trade. A vast majority of were neglected to the point that they were beyond help, and needed euthanasia. Either the pet owner never learned how to properly care for the animal, or they had simply lost interest in it, or both.

I started keeping reptiles and amphibians because I thought they were amazing animals. I respected them as living things. That respect made me get out of the trade entirely.



posted on Sep, 9 2012 @ 02:17 AM
link   
reply to post by redneckprincess
 


I gave you star, just because I believe your claim that you are a responsible animal owner. I respect that, and expect that from animal owners.

At one time, I had 1000s of exotic animals on my property. I also had small children, of my own, who were around the animals. The animals were also not limited to reptiles and amphibians. We never had Salmonella, or any other zoonotic disease. It probably helped that both my wife and I are formally educated in biology.

However, people like you and I, are not the norm. Most people rush to the pet store, and impulsively buy an animal. Everything they learn is provided by the sales associate. Anything they buy to care for the animal is also suggested by the sales associate. I imagine, it's still true to say that many are still given improper information, and told whatever it takes for them to walk out the door with the animal.

I know that's not true of every pet store, and I know of some fabulous ones, which are run by people who really care about animals. These folks do whatever it takes to make sure that the public gets educated. Sadly, they are not the norm in the trade. Like any other business, the animal trade is about making money. That's why a fair amount of people get involved with selling animals. It is a very profitable business.
edit on 9-9-2012 by tamusan because: (no reason given)



new topics




 
2

log in

join